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Children in families with limited resources across Scotland 2014-2016

Published: 28 Nov 2017 09:30

New experimental statistics on “Children in families with limited resources across Scotland 2014-2016” were published by Scotland’s Chief Statistician today. This publication provides estimates of the proportion of children in combined low income and material deprivation by council area and household characteristics.

These statistics are only produced for local purposes. The official statistics at national level are those included with the annual Poverty and Income Inequality publication.

Key findings

  • Children in Glasgow are more likely to live in families with limited resources compared with Scotland as a whole. Children in Aberdeenshire, East Lothian, East Renfrewshire, Shetland Islands and Moray are less likely to live in families with limited resources.
  • Children who live in households with a single parent, adults with a disability, at most one adult in employment, or three or more siblings, are more likely to have limited resources compared to Scotland as a whole. Children who live in families with two or more adults, or at least two adults in employment, are less likely to have limited resources.
  • Children are more likely to live in families with limited resources if they live in a rented property, or in the most deprived areas, compared with Scotland as a whole. Children are less likely to live in families with limited resources if they live in an accessible rural area, or if they live in the least deprived areas.

Background

The statistics on children in families with limited resources are based on data from the Scottish Household Survey.

The measure looks at children in families that are in combined low income and material deprivation. Low income means household incomes below 70% of the Scottish median (middle) income after housing costs. Material deprivation means families are unable to afford three or more out of a list of 22 basic necessities. The list of necessities was developed for a Scottish context and is based on what the public agree is a basic necessity and what satisfies statistical requirements for a robust material deprivation measure.

The measure is similar to an already existing measure, the official statistics on “Children in combined low income and material deprivation”, which provide a national headline figure and are based on data from the Family Resources Survey. The methodologies between these two measure differ due to the different data sources. The purpose of the new measure is to provide local area breakdowns that haven’t been available previously.

 

Notes to editors

The full statistical publication is available at:

http://www.gov.scot/isbn/9781788514477

These new statistics were published as experimental statistics. This means that the data and methodology are being further developed for future updates.

Further information on income and poverty statistics within Scotland can be accessed at: http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Statistics/Browse/Social-Welfare

Official statistics are produced by professionally independent statistical staff – more information on the standards of official statistics in Scotland can be assessed at: http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Statistics/About.