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Expert panel appointed

Published: 29 Jan 2016 10:34
Part of:
Education

Seven members join independent Scottish Science Advisory Council.

ISSUED ON BEHALF OF THE SCOTTISH SCIENCE ADVISORY COUNCIL


Seven leading scientists are set to form a revitalised Scottish Science Advisory Council (SSAC) to advise Scottish Ministers from 1 February.

The appointments follow an internal review of the SSAC's role and remit, including how it provides advice on science-related issues to Government and the Chief Scientific Adviser.

The new members are:

Professor Paul Boyle CBE FBA FRSE, President and Vice-Chancellor, University of Leicester (Chair of SSAC)

Prof Iain Hunter, Research Professor of Molecular Microbiology, University of Strathclyde

Prof Colin McInnes MBE FRSE, James Watt Chair, Professor of Engineering Science, University of Glasgow

Prof Anna Meredith, Professor of Zoological and Conservation Medicine, University of Edinburgh

Prof Andrew Mount FRSC, Professor of Physical Electrochemistry and Dean of Research, University of Edinburgh

Prof Susan Rosser, Professor of Synthetic Biology, University of Edinburgh

Dr Tara Spires-Jones, Reader and Chancellor's Fellow, University of Edinburgh

The new members of the SSAC bring a wealth of science expertise, from research in space engineering and Alzheimer's disease, to experience of working with industry and organisations across the UK and in Europe.

Commenting on his appointment and plans for the SSAC, new Chair Professor Paul Boyle said:

"This is an exciting time to be joining the SSAC. The independent scientific advice provided by the Council will be a vital part of the information that Ministers and policy officials across the Scottish Government will use to make robust decisions that will benefit Scotland's future economy and society."

Science Minister Dr Alasdair Allan welcomed the appointments:

"Science is at the heart of much of the Scottish Government's work, driving our economy and improving our quality of life. These new appointments will help ensure we have access to the very best scientific advice across a diverse range of policy areas. It is also heartening to see that nearly half of the new appointments are female scientists at a time when we need more young women to take up science, technology, engineering and mathematics careers. We are currently recruiting for a new Chief Scientific Adviser for Scotland who will work closely with the SSAC once appointed."

The SSAC is an important source of science advice, and complements the other science advisers available to the Scottish Government, including the Chief Scientist (Health) and the Chief Scientific Adviser for Rural Affairs, Food and the Environment.

Notes to editors

Biographical information about all the new members is available on the SSAC website: http://www.scottishscience.org.uk/article/announcement-new-ssac-members

Appointments are for two years, from 1 February 2016 to 31 January 2018.

The first meeting of the new SSAC will be on 4 March, 2016. The agenda will focus on the SSAC's priorities for the next two years.

As well as the seven members announced today, there are a further three ex-officio members of the SSAC: Professor Andrew Morris (Chief Scientist, Health), Professor Louise Heathwaite (Chief Scientific Adviser for Rural Affairs, Food and the Environment), and the Chief Scientific Adviser for Scotland. The CSA Scotland post is currently being recruited with a deadline of 29 February. Further details about the CSA recruitment campaign can be found at http://www.saxbam.com/appointment-details/570-chief-scientific-adviser-for-scotland

The SSAC has previously been co-Chaired by the CSA Scotland. Following a review of the SSAC's functions, carried out in 2015, it was agreed that an independent Chair of SSAC should be recruited. The CSA Scotland will remain an ex-officio member of SSAC.

More information about the review of the SSAC can be found on the SSAC's website http://www.scottishscience.org.uk The review made recommendations to help maximise the impact of the Council. As a result the SSAC comprises a smaller number of members than before, allowing for a more focussed but still well-connected council.