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Publication - Report

Child poverty strategy: annual report, 2016

Published: 21 Dec 2016
Part of:
Children and families, Communities and third sector
ISBN:
9781786526977

The third annual report on the Child Poverty Strategy for Scotland, which was published in March 2014.

62 page PDF

2.6MB

62 page PDF

2.6MB

Contents
Child poverty strategy: annual report, 2016
Footnotes

62 page PDF

2.6MB

Footnotes

1 The poverty threshold is adjusted, based on the size and composition of the household, recognising that smaller and larger households may need different levels of income to maintain the same standard of living. This process of adjustment is known as equivalisation.

2 Unless otherwise stated

3 An increase or decrease by 1.5 percentage points or less is assessed as 'performance maintaining'.

4 Costs are presented in 2015 prices. An increase or decrease by less than 5% of the (inflation-adjusted) baseline is assessed as 'performance maintaining'.

5 The figure for 2014 has been updated in line with revised 2014 data released in November 2015.

6 Unless otherwise stated

7 The sample was divided into three groups, on the basis of their combined scores for the constituent items of WEMWBS. The three groups are those with 'above average' mental wellbeing (a score of over one standard deviation above the mean score), those with 'average' mental wellbeing (a score within one standard deviation of the mean) and those with 'below average' mental wellbeing (a score of more than one standard deviation below the mean). This threefold classification has been created solely for the purposes of analysis and is not based on any evidence that an average or below average score is problematic. As a rule, WEMWBS scores are not used as a diagnostic tool.

8 Figures for 2010/11 to 2013/14 have been calculated using an updated methodology.

9 An increase or decrease of less than 500 is assessed as 'performance maintaining'.

10 An increase or decrease of less than 4 percentage points is assessed as 'performance maintaining'.

11It compares median housing costs for all tenures to median net unequivalised household incomes.

12 It should be noted that postcode information required for SIMD is not available for 26% of survey respondents in the HBSC. Findings presented are for the remaining individuals only.

13 The definition of this indicator was changed slightly from 2013 onwards, to align with green space access standards for local authorities. Therefore, the most recent findings are not directly comparable to those from 2011 and 2012, which relate to green space within a six-minute walk or less.

14 The 2016 estimate is for April 2016, and therefore a Living Wage rate of £8.25 has been applied. The 2013 estimate is based on a rate of £7.45.

15 Adjusted for inflation using 2015 as the base year.

16 SCQF level 4 ('National 4', which replaced Intermediate 1 or General Standard Grade) or below.

17 This indicator has been revised since the 2015 Annual Report. Data is no longer collected on eligibility for free school meals in the SALSUS survey; therefore, SIMD has been used as a measure of low income instead. The figure for the baseline has been revised accordingly.

18 This indicator has been revised since the 2015 Annual Report. Data is no longer collected on eligibility for free school meals in the SALSUS survey; therefore, SIMD has been used as a measure of low income instead. The figure for the baseline has been revised accordingly.

19 The Family Affluence Scale ( FAS) is constructed on the basis of questions about material resources (number of cars, holidays, PC and bedrooms). The FAS has three categories of affluence, containing a third of the sample each.

20 Information on attainment and leaver destinations has been updated following methodological changes and changes to data availability. Data for the 2010/12, 2012/13 and 2013/14 leaver cohorts have been updated, and supersede previously published figures for these years. This means that the 2012/13 figure reported here (82.4%) is slightly higher than the 2012/13 figure reported in the 2014 Annual Report for the Child Poverty Strategy (81.9%). The 2014/15 figure also uses the new methodology


Contact

Email: Alison Stout