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Social security agency: central functions location analysis

Published: 19 Sep 2017

Report setting out evidence base for making a decision on where the social security agency’s centrally based functions will be located.

45 page PDF

1.5MB

45 page PDF

1.5MB

Contents
Social security agency: central functions location analysis
5. Local Authority profiles

45 page PDF

1.5MB

5. Local Authority profiles

5.1 Glasgow City

Ability to Recruit – Implementability and Risk – Rank 1 of 15

Glasgow City is the largest and most densely populated Local Authority in Scotland, with a population of over 600,000 people. Of these, around 295,000 are working age and economically active, which means that they are either in employment or are available and actively looking for employment.

Around 25,000 people in Glasgow City Local Authority area report being unemployed, i.e. without a job and actively seeking work. Around 6,200 people have been claiming out of work benefits such as Jobseeker's Allowance ( JSA) and Universal Credit ( UC) [8] for less than 12 months. This provides an indication of a sizeable spare capacity in Glasgow itself before any consideration is given to the surrounding commutable areas.

Glasgow also has 57,200 people already employed in administrative and secretarial and sales and customer service occupations, which are most relevant for agency's staff profile.

Once adjusted for the neighbouring and commutable Local Authorities, these numbers indicate a sizeable spare capacity in the local labour market as well as an existing pool of employees in occupations relevant to the agency's recruitment needs, lowering the risk around recruitment.

Education and skills levels, as measured by the proportion of school leavers in positive destinations and those who achieve above SCQF5 levels of qualifications, are lower than in most other Local Authority areas. There is also some indication of challenges around recruitment with a high proportion of hard to fill vacancies and skill gaps in some relevant occupations.

However, the size of the workforce in Glasgow and surrounding areas is much larger than in any other Local Authority and this will be the main factor in minimising the risk around recruitment.

Inclusive Growth – Economy and Environment - Rank 13 of 15

Glasgow City does less well on the Inclusive Growth criteria because of its considerable contribution to the Scotland's economy, high rate of business creation and availability of employment opportunities.

Growth has been strong in Glasgow over the past decade or so, with Gross Value Added ( GVA) estimated to have risen by 11% between 2004 and 2014. GVA per worker (£44,000) is relatively high compared to other Local Authorities, although is smaller compared to Edinburgh's (£48,700) and Aberdeen's (£55,400). GVA per working age person is higher still at £46,400, most likely an indication of substantial level of commuting in from neighbouring areas, which is characteristic of urban areas, although the difference is not as notable as it is for Aberdeen City.

Around 1.6% of businesses in Glasgow have more than 100 employees - one of the highest rates in Scotland (median rate across the 15 Local Authorities is 1.1%). Glasgow also has a strong business birth rate, second only to Edinburgh and Aberdeen. Employment projections are strong, with 4.0% employment growth projected between 2015 and 2024 (median rate of 0.5%).

Regeneration – Equality and Poverty – Rank 4(=) of 15

Glasgow experiences very high levels of deprivation. 48% of its SIMD datazones are among the 20% most deprived in Scotland - the highest percentage of any Local Authority in Scotland. Less than 10% of Glasgow's SIMD datazones are among the 20% least deprived in Scotland, which is one of the lowest percentages in Scotland, with only North Lanarkshire and West Dunbartonshire having lower percentages.

Deprived areas are concentrated in the south and east of the city [9] , including areas such as the Gorbals, Govanhill, Bridgeton, Dalmarnock and Gallowgate. Other deprived areas include Springburn, Possil Park, Maryhill and Moorpark.

On the other hand, the population of Glasgow has risen by 6.5% between 2005 and 2015. There has been net in-migration over the past decade which increased population by 3.9%. This compares to smaller surrounding Local Authority areas, such as Inverclyde, West Dunbartonshire and North Ayrshire, which have seen declines in population over the past decade and net out-migration.

Contribution to Local Delivery – Dignity and Respect – Rank 1 of 15

In November 2016, there were around 79,400 people claiming disability benefits – Disability Living Allowance, Personal Independence Payment and Attendance Allowance ( DLA/ PIP/ AA). This is the highest number of all Local Authorities in Scotland, due to both the size of Glasgow City's population but also specifically high concentrations of claimants in the area (Edinburgh's population is only 18% lower than Glasgow's but the number of disability benefit claimants is less than half of that in Glasgow). Disability benefit claimants make up 13.1% of total population of Glasgow. This is on par with Inverclyde and West Dunbartonshire as the highest percentage among Phase 2 Local Authorities.

There were 11,700 people in Glasgow claiming Carers Allowance ( CA) – at 1.9% this is the highest proportion of total population of all Phase 2 Local Authorities.

Glasgow also has the highest number of people claiming Tax Credits ( TCs). Receipt of Tax Credits can be taken as a proxy for eligibility for benefits such as the Best Start Grant and provides a general indication of the size of the caseload for any means-tested benefits that could be devolved or created in the longer term.

5.2 North Lanarkshire

Ability to Recruit – Implementability and Risk – Rank 3 of 15

With a population of over 340,000 people, North Lanarkshire is the fourth largest Local Authority in Phase 2 behind Glasgow, Edinburgh and Fife. Around 170,000 people in North Lanarkshire are of working age and economically active. Around 2,900 have been claiming out of work benefits such as JSA and UC for less than
12 months.

The population of North Lanarkshire is not concentrated in one area, with six towns with a population of more than 20,000: Cumbernauld (51,610), Coatbridge (43,970), Airdrie (37,130), Motherwell (32,120), Wishaw (31,510) and Bellshill (20,650) [10] . These larger towns are found in the west of the Local Authority (nearest to Glasgow), with the east more sparsely populated.

North Lanarkshire's geography means its main towns are accessible by public transport from other Local Authorities. North Lanarkshire borders Falkirk, East Dunbartonshire, Glasgow, South Lanarkshire and West Lothian and is commutable from key towns in those areas, with some parts also commutable by public transport from Stirling.

The short-term unemployment level in North Lanarkshire is the second highest of the 15 Local Authority areas, indicating a significant pool of people looking for work. Around 37,400 people in North Lanarkshire are employed in administrative and secretarial and sales and customer service occupations. North Lanarkshire does not perform as well against measures related to skills and education, with 68.8% of 16-64 year olds with SCQF5 qualifications or higher compared to a median of 72.5%.

Inclusive Growth – Economy and Environment - Rank 9(=) of 15

With relatively strong economic performance in terms of GVA growth and recent falling unemployment rates, North Lanarkshire ranks as below the median for achieving Inclusive Growth despite a lack of local employment opportunities and low business activity.

Growth has been strong in North Lanarkshire over the past decade or so, with GVA estimated to have risen by 23% between 2004 and 2014. GVA per worker remains relatively low (£40,900) and is the fourth lowest amongst the Phase 2 Local Authorities. North Lanarkshire's unemployment rate fell by around 4 percentage points between 2015 and 2016, the largest fall of any Local Authority during this period.

North Lanarkshire's ranking against the Inclusive Growth criteria is pushed upwards by the indicators pointing to a relative lack of local employment opportunities within the area. At £27,100, GVA per working age person is substantially lower than GVA per worker, indicating substantial out-commuting to neighbouring areas for work, such as Glasgow. The workplace-based employment rate (as a percentage of 16-64 year old population) in North Lanarkshire is the lowest across all Phase 2 Local Authorities (51%). This means there are nearly twice as many 16-64 year olds living in North Lanarkshire than working there. This compares to Glasgow and Aberdeen, where there are more 16-64 olds employed in these areas than live there, reflecting the concentrations of economic activity in these areas.

Regeneration – Equality and Poverty – Rank 4(=) of 15

Just under a third (32%) of North Lanarkshire's SIMD datazones are along the 20% most deprived in Scotland, which is above the median in Phase 2 (27%). Less than 10% of North Lanarkshire's SIMD datazones are in least deprived 20% - the second lowest in the short-list. Deprived datazones are generally found within all of the 6 major towns in the Local Authority, with Cumbernauld being somewhat less deprived with only a single datazone in the most deprived 5% of datazones in Scotland.

North Lanarkshire's population has increased over the past 10 years by 3.4% which is relatively strong growth compared to other Local Authorities which have seen smaller increases or experienced declines in population over this same period. Net migration over the past decade has been close to zero overall.

Contribution to Local Delivery – Dignity and Respect – Rank 2 of 15

In November 2016, there were around 41,900 people claiming disability benefits ( DLA/ PIP/ AA). Although this level is second highest of all 15 Local Authorities considered, it is substantially lower than the level in Glasgow City (79,400). Disability benefit claimants make up 12.4% of the total population of North Lanarkshire which is the fourth highest rate among the Phase 2 Local Authorities (Glasgow, Inverclyde and West Dunbartonshire all have slightly higher rates).

There were just under 6,000 claiming Carer's Allowance – at 1.8% it is one of the highest rates amongst Phase 2 Local Authorities. Around 24,800 households are in receipt of Tax Credits – around half of the number in Glasgow but still second highest of the fifteen Phase 2 Local Authorities.

5.3 South Lanarkshire

Ability to Recruit – Implementability and Risk – Rank 6(=) of 15

South Lanarkshire's population of over 316,000 people makes it the fifth largest Local Authority of the fifteen considered at Phase 2. Of these, around 156,800 are working age and economically active. Around 7,500 people report being unemployed and around 2,300 have been claiming out of work benefits such as JSA and UC for less than 12 months. These numbers are amplified by the substantial labour force in the neighbouring Local Authorities, from parts of which commuting is possible.

South Lanarkshire covers a large geographical area, spanning south along the Clyde Valley. The vast majority of its population is concentrated in the north of the authority in the Greater Glasgow suburbs such as Cambuslang (27,610) and Rutherglen (31,180) and in towns such as Hamilton (53,200) and East Kilbride (74,740). Uddingston and Blantyre are smaller towns.

South Lanarkshire's towns generally have good public transport links to Glasgow and North Lanarkshire which allow commuting from those areas, as well as from East Renfrewshire. It should be noted that transport links vary across the authority. Uddingston and Cambuslang are the most connected centres by public transport (on the Edinburgh Waverly – Glasgow Central line), whilst Blantyre, Hamilton and, in particular, East Kilbride are more isolated on the rail network.

Indicators suggest that both North and South Lanarkshire [11] have relatively low skills gaps in sales and customer service and administration and clerical services, as well relatively low Skill Shortages.

South Lanarkshire's Ability to Recruit score is weakened by a relatively low short-term unemployment level, low skills and education levels and a low number of people employed in business administration and public administration sectors. South Lanarkshire's population density is also low. However this is due to the particular geography of the authority.

Inclusive Growth – Economy and Environment - Rank 4(=) of 15

Growth has been relatively weak in South Lanarkshire over the past decade or so, with GVA estimated to have risen by 2% between 2004 and 2014. More recently, GVA has risen by 2.6% on average annually over 2010 to 2014. At £40,945, GVA per worker is low compared to other Local Authorities, putting it just within the bottom 5 Local Authorities on this measure. GVA per working age person is substantially lower at £26,300 indicating substantial levels of commuting-out for work.

The unemployment rate in South Lanarkshire has risen by 0.3% between 2015 and 2016, the only Local Authority to see an increase over this period, excluding Aberdeen and Aberdeenshire. Similarly to North Lanarkshire, the workplace-based employment (as a percentage of 16-64 year old population) is the third lowest across all Phase 2 Local Authorities (54%).

South Lanarkshire's Inclusive Growth score is dragged down by lower scores for Economic Diversity indicators, with relatively high proportions of the workforce employed in the public sector. South Lanarkshire also has a relatively high number of businesses for its size – the rate is similar to Glasgow and is higher than in Dundee.

Regeneration – Equality and Poverty – Rank 9 of 15

South Lanarkshire has lower levels of deprivation compared to some of the surrounding areas. Around 21% of datazones in South Lanarkshire are within the 20% most deprived in Scotland, compared to a median of 27% amongst Phase 2 LAs. Around 13% of datazones income deprived and 12% are employment deprived, which is around the median proportion across the fifteen Phase 2 Local Authorities. South Lanarkshire has seen some population growth over the last decade and net in-migration – both at around 3%.

Contribution to Local Delivery – Dignity and Respect – Rank 3 of 15

In November 2016, there were around 35,500 people claiming disability benefits ( DLA/ PIP/ AA), making up 11.2% of total population of South Lanarkshire, which is the median rate across the fifteen Local Authorities. There were 5,000 claiming Carers Allowance, making up 1.6% of the total population, which is also the median. There were 20,100 households in receipt of Tax Credits.

5.4 Dundee

Ability to Recruit – Implementability and Risk – Rank 4(=) of 15

At 148,200, Dundee's population is relatively small compared to the other three large cities and some of the other Local Authorities in Phase 2. Around 68,500 are working age and economically active. Around 6,200 report being unemployed and around 1,400 have been claiming out of work benefits such as JSA and UC for less than 12 months.

Dundee can be accessed by public transport from surrounding areas such as North East Fife, Perth, and Angus towns such as Arbroath and Forfar, although transport links are arguably not as good as in some areas in the west of Scotland.

Dundee is somewhat weaker on Access to Labour Force indicators compared to areas such as Fife. For example, around 12,900 people in Dundee are employed in the business support and public administration sectors compared with around 34,800 in Fife. However, Dundee's labour force is concentrated in one city and only Glasgow has a higher population density. This gives Dundee an advantage in terms of recruitment compared to larger but less densely populated Local Authorities.

Indicators also suggest that Dundee has the lowest skills gap for administrative and clerical staff roles of any Local Authority and only 6% of businesses are recorded as having at least one vacancy that is hard to fill compared, for example, to 11% in Fife and 10% in Falkirk. The chosen indicators suggest that education and skills levels in Dundee are around the median level amongst the fifteen Local Authorities.

Inclusive Growth – Economy and Environment - Rank 9(=) of 15

Growth has been steady in Dundee over the long-term, with Gross Value Added estimated to have risen by 6% between 2004 and 2014. More recently, GVA has risen by 2.6% on average annually over 2010 to 2014. GVA per worker (£43,208) is relatively high compared to other Local Authorities, placing it 6 th behind Edinburgh, Aberdeen, Glasgow, Renfrewshire and Inverclyde.

The unemployment rate in Dundee has fallen by 1.8% between 2015 and 2016, a relatively large decline compared to other Local Authorities. However, the overall employment rate in Dundee sits at 66% which is one of the lowest in Scotland (64% in North Ayrshire is the lowest) and employment demand in secretarial, sales and customer service occupations is projected to fall.

Notably, at £36,100, Dundee's GVA per working age person is lower than GVA per worker – the only one of the four large cities for which this is the case. This suggests that the pull of commuters into Dundee is not as strong as in other cities and that a substantial number of residents in Dundee City Local Authorities commute elsewhere for work.

There is some additional indication that the business climate in Dundee is relatively weak. There is a relatively low number of businesses per 10,000 people and a low business survival rate. Dundee also has a significant proportion of employees already working in the public sector. However, the proportion of large business with more than 100 employees is second only to Aberdeen.

Regeneration – Equality and Poverty – Rank 7 of 15

Dundee experiences relatively high levels of deprivation. 37% of its SIMD datazones are among the 20% most deprived in Scotland – the fifth highest share amongst Phase 2 Local Authorities. The proportion of datazones within the least deprived 20% in Dundee is the same as the median level across Phase 2 Local Authorities (15.4%). The proportion of datazones that are income and employment deprived are also slightly above the median.

Over the past decade Dundee's population has increased by 3.2% (which is above the median) and there has been net in-migration which amounted to 3.8% of population.

Contribution to Local Delivery – Dignity and Respect – Rank 7(=) of 15

In November 2016, there were around 16,900 people claiming disability benefits ( DLA/ PIP/ AA), making up 11.4% of total population of Dundee, which is just above the median figure across Phase 2. There were 2,370 claiming Carers Allowance, making up 1.6% of the population, which is the median rate across the fifteen Local Authorities.

Whilst Dundee is close to the average in terms of concentrations of claimants per head of population, the levels are relatively low due to its relatively small size.

5.5 Renfrewshire

Ability to Recruit – Implementability and Risk – Rank 8 of 15

Renfrewshire is a medium sized Local Authority in terms of its population size, with around 175,000 residents, of which 86,700 are of working age and economically active. Around 4,800 report being unemployed and around 1,500 have been claiming out of work benefits such as JSA and UC for less than 12 months.

The population of Renfrewshire is mainly concentrated in Paisley (76,220), with the other main towns - Renfrew (22,010) and Johnstone (16,390) - considerably smaller.

Renfrewshire scores relatively low across most of the Access to Labour Force indicators. Renfrewshire's working-age economically active population (including neighbouring Local Authorities) is 8 th highest out of Phase 2 Local Authorities. However, the percentage of school leavers in positive destinations and percentage of 16-64 years olds with a good qualification is relatively high compared to other authorities. Renfrewshire also has a small skills gap in relation to sales and customer services compared to other Local Authorities.

Inclusive Growth – Economy and Environment - Rank 6(=) of 15

Growth has been very weak in Renfrewshire over the past decade or so, with Gross Value Added estimated to have fallen by 3% between 2004 and 2014. More recently, GVA has fallen by 1.2% on average annually over 2010 to 2014. However, GVA per worker (£43,345) is below above the average compared to other Phase 2 Local Authorities.

The employment picture in Renfrewshire is much more positive. Employment has risen by a significant 13% (the highest rise of any Local Authority) between 2015 and 2016 and the employment rate overall is one of the highest in Scotland (75%) - higher than Edinburgh for example.

Regeneration – Equality and Poverty – Rank 8 out of 15

Around 27% (equal to the median) of datazones in Renfrewshire are within the 20% most deprived in Scotland. Around 19% of datazones are with the 20% least deprived which is slightly above the median in the short-list (15%). Total population has increased by 1.8% over the past decade or so.

Contribution to Local Delivery – Dignity and Respect – Rank 7(=) out of 15

In November 2016, there were around 19,360 people claiming disability benefits ( DLA/ PIP/ AA), making up 11.1% of total population of Renfrewshire. There were 2,330 claiming Carers Allowance, making up 1.3% of the total population. There were 11,800 households in receipt of Tax Credits.

5.6 North Ayrshire

Ability to Recruit – Implementability and Risk – Rank 12 of 15

North Ayrshire's population is relatively small compared to other Phase 2 Local Authorities . Of the 136,100 people living in North Ayrshire, 59,000 are working age and economically active. Around 1,450 have been claiming out of work benefits such as JSA and UC for less than 12 months.

The population of North Ayrshire is concentrated in a few towns in the south of the authority. The largest town is Irvine (33,740) and other smaller towns in close proximity include Kilwinning (16,420), Ardrossan (10,930), Saltcoats (12,800) and Stevenson (9,290). Irvine is also close to other large towns in bordering East Ayrshire (Kilmarnock) and South Ayrshire (Ayr).

North Ayrshire scores poorly against Access to Labour Force indicators. For example, North Ayrshire has a particular low employment in the business support and public administration sector. When neighbouring Local Authorities are taken into account, the working-age population within the orbit of the authority is around 100,000 people. Only three other Phase 2 Local Authorities have less 100,000 working-age people, taking into account neighbouring Local Authorities

Although school leaver destinations are broadly positive, the education levels in the general population are low in North Ayrshire. One area that North Ayrshire performs particularly well in is the small number of businesses that report vacancies due to local skill shortages.

Inclusive Growth – Economy and Environment - Rank 1 of 15

Growth has been poor in North Ayrshire over the past decade or so, with Gross Value Added estimated to have fallen by 7.5% between 2004 and 2014, the biggest decline of any Local Authority over this period. More recently, GVA has risen by 1.9% on average annually over 2010 to 2014. GVA per worker stood at around £41,200.

The employment rate in North Ayrshire is the lowest amongst Phase 2 Local Authorities (64%) and only 55% of people living in North Ayrshire work in their home area. Employment is projected to fall a further 1.9% between 2015 and 2024. The number of businesses per 1,000 people and the business birth rate is also low in North Ayrshire.

Regeneration – Equality and Poverty – Rank 3 of 15

North Ayrshire ranks 3 rd for Regeneration, scoring 2.0 (median is 1.5).

North Ayrshire experiences relatively high levels of deprivation. 38% of its SIMD datazones are among the 20% most deprived in Scotland – the fourth highest share amongst Phase 2 Local Authorities. Less than 10% of North Ayrshire's SIMD datazones are within the least deprived 20%. The proportion of datazones that are income and employment deprived are above the median.

In addition to high levels of deprivation, the population of North Ayrshire has declined over the past decade or so by 0.4% compared to most other authorities in Scotland which have seen an increase in population over the period 2005 to 2015.

Contribution to Local Delivery – Dignity and Respect – Rank 5(=) of 15

In November 2016, there were around 16,000 people claiming disability benefits ( DLA/ PIP/ AA), making up 11.8% of total population of the authority. There were 2,410 claiming Carers Allowance, making up 1.8% of the total population, which is above the median and one of the highest proportions in Scotland.

5.7 Inverclyde

Ability to Recruit – Implementability and Risk – Rank 13(=) of 15

Inverclyde is the smallest Local Authority in Phase 2, with a population of fewer than 80,000 people. Of these, around 37,000 are working age and economically active, which means that they are either in employment or are available and actively looking for employment. Around 3,100 report being unemployed and around 1,200 have been claiming out of work benefits such as JSA and UC for less than 12 months.

Most of the population is concentrated in Greenock (43,690) and in the neighbouring Port Glasgow and Gourock (25,760 in total). Inverclyde borders Renfrewshire and North Ayrshire. Greenock (and potentially the adjacent Port Glasgow) would be the only practical location for the agency headquarters.

The population of Inverclyde is too small for the agency to be staffed with current resident population only. There are also issues around the education levels and skills in the areas. However, good train links to Glasgow city and Renfrewshire (Paisley) would allow employees to commute and the Access to Labour Force indicators are adjusted to take this into account. The agency location could also encourage in-migration into the area, potentially partly reversing a long-term outmigration trend.

Inclusive Growth – Economy and Environment - Rank 4(=) of 15

Growth has been weak in Inverclyde over the past decade or so, with GVA estimated to have fallen by 2.7% between 2004 and 2014. More recently there has been some expansion in the local economy, with GVA rising by 3.2% on average annually over 2010 to 2014. At £43,700, GVA per worker however, compared favourably to neighbouring areas such as East Ayrshire and West Dunbartonshire.

Business birth and survival rates per head of population are low.

Regeneration - Equality and Poverty - Rank 1 of 15

Inverclyde experiences high levels of deprivation. 44% of its SIMD datazones are among the 20% most deprived in Scotland – Glasgow City is the only other Local Authority with a higher share. There are largely around Greenock and Port Glasgow. Only 13% of Inverclyde's datazones are in Scotland's least deprived 20%.

Contribution to Local Delivery – Dignity and Respect – Rank 7(=) of 15

In November 2016, there were 10,440 people claiming disability benefits ( DLA/ PIP/ AA), making up 13.1% of total population of Inverclyde – the equal highest rate among the Phase 2 Local Authorities. There were 1,420 claiming Carers Allowance – at 1.8% it is the second higher rate amongst Phase 2 Local Authorities.

5.8 West Dunbartonshire

Ability to Recruit – Implementability and Risk – Rank 13(=) of 15

West Dunbartonshire is also one of the smallest Local Authorities in Phase 2 with a population of less than 90,000. Of these around 43,000 are working age and economically active. Around 3,000 report being unemployed and around 1,000 have been claiming out of work benefits such as JSA and UC for less than 12 months.

The population of West Dunbartonshire is split across two main centres of population - Clydebank (26,640) and Dumbarton (19,950). Similar to Inverclyde, the area is too small for the agency to be staffed with current resident population. The agency would be dependent on staff commuting from neighbouring Local Authorities, particularly Glasgow and East Dunbartonshire and the Access to Labour Force indicators are adjusted to take this into account.

Overall West Dunbartonshire scores poorly across all Access to Labour Force indicators, with short-term unemployment levels being particularly low. West Dunbartonshire's education and skills scores are the lowest amongst all Local Authorities.

Inclusive Growth – Economy and Environment - Rank 4(=) of 15

West Dunbartonshire scores 1.7 for Inclusive Growth and is ranked equal 4 th amongst all Phase 2 Local Authorities.

Growth has been flat in West Dunbartonshire over the past decade or so, with GVA estimated to have fallen by 0.6% between 2004 and 2014. However, more recently, GVA has fallen sharply by 1.6% on average annually over 2010 to 2014. GVA per worker (£37,400) is the second lowest of any of the Phase 2 Local Authorities.

Although the resident based employment rate in West Dunbartonshire is 71%, which is close to the median for the fifteen Local Authorities, less than half of the people living in West Dunbartonshire work in their home area. Employment is projected to fall by 3.4% between 2015 and 2024, the biggest projected fall across all Local Authorities. The number of businesses per 10,000 people is the lowest of any Local Authority and the percentage of those employed in the public sector is the highest of any Local Authority.

Regeneration – Equality and Poverty – Rank 2 of 15

West Dunbartonshire experiences high levels of deprivation. 40% of its SIMD datazones are among the 20% most deprived in Scotland – the third highest share amongst Phase 2 Local Authorities. Less than 5% of West Dunbartonshire's SIMD datazones are within the least deprived 20%, the lowest proportion of any Local Authority. The proportion of datazones that are income and employment deprived are also well above the median.

In addition to high levels of deprivation, the population of West Dunbartonshire has declined over the past decade or so by 2.1%, compared to most other authorities in Scotland which have seen an increase in population over this period. Only Inverclyde has seen a larger percentage fall in population terms over this period.

Contribution to Local Delivery – Dignity and Respect – Rank 5(=) of 15

In November 2016, there were around 11,600 people claiming disability benefits ( DLA/ PIP/ AA), making up 13% of total population of the authority, one of the highest percentages of any Local Authority. There were 1,560 claiming Carers Allowance, making up 1.7% of the total population. Around 7,100 households receive Tax Credits.

5.9 East Ayrshire

Ability to Recruit – Implementability and Risk – Rank 13(=) of 15

East Ayrshire has the 3 rd lowest population of the Local Authorities considered in Phase 2, with around 122,000 residents, of which 54,300 are of working age and economically active. Around 1,300 have been claiming out of work benefits such as JSA and UC for less than 12 months.

The population of East Ayrshire is concentrated in the town of Kilmarnock (46,350), with Cumnock being the next largest town (8,920) within the Local Authority.

Because of its relatively small size, East Ayrshire scores relatively poorly across most of the Access to Labour Force indicators, even when these are adjusted to take into account the neighbouring areas from which employees could commute. East Ayrshire's working-age economically active population is the 3 rd lowest amongst all Phase 2 Local Authorities. East Ayrshire also has low employment levels in sectors and occupations similar to that of future agency staff such as administration, customer service and sales. East Ayrshire's ranking on skills and education measures is also low compared to other Phase 2 Local Authorities.

Inclusive Growth – Economy and Environment - Rank 2(=) of 15

Growth has been weak in East Ayrshire over the past decade or so, with Gross Value Added estimated to have fallen by 1% between 2004 and 2014. More recently, GVA has risen by 0.3% on average annually over 2010 to 2014. GVA per worker (£35,000) is the lowest of any Local Authority considered at Phase 2.

The current employment picture in East Ayrshire is also weak relative to other Local Authorities. The employment rate is 66% - the second lowest amongst Phase 2 Local Authorities. East Ayrshire also performs poorly against the Business Creation indicator.

Regeneration – Equality and Poverty – Rank 4(=) out of 15

Around 33% of datazones in East Renfrewshire are within the 20% most deprived in Scotland, which is above the median of 27% amongst the Phase 2 Local Authorities. Around 11% datazones are with the 20% least deprived which is below the median in the short-list (15%). Total population has increased by 1.5% over the past decade or so, which is relatively low compared to other Phase 2 Local Authorities.

Contribution to Local Delivery – Dignity and Respect – Rank 7(=) out of 15

In November 2016, there were around 13,800 people claiming disability benefits ( DLA/ PIP/ AA), making up 11.3% of total population of East Ayrshire. There were 2,160 claiming Carers Allowance, making up 1.8% of the total population.

5.10 Fife

Ability to Recruit – Implementability and Risk – Rank 6(=) of 15

Fife is one of the largest Local Authorities analysed in Phase 2, with a population of nearly 370,000 people. Of these, around 174,000 are working age and economically active, which means that they are either in employment or are available and actively looking for employment. Around 2,800 have been claiming out of work benefits such as JSA and UC for less than 12 months.

The urban population of Fife is concentrated in four main areas: Dunfermline (50,380), Kirkcaldy (49,460), Glenrothes (39,100) and Levenmouth [12] (24,460). These towns are located in the south and west of Fife, with the north east of Fife being largely rural with a few smaller towns such as Cupar and St. Andrews.

Despite Fife's relatively large working age population (3rd amongst the Phase 2 Local Authorities) and potential for workers to commute from Edinburgh, Dundee, as well as Perth and Clackmannanshire, overall Fife scores just above the median against Ability to Recruit indicators. This is partly driven by it being sparsely populated compared to other areas. Fife's score is driven down by its relatively poor school leaver destinations and lower scores against vacancy and skills gap indicators.

Inclusive Growth – Economy and Environment - Rank 9(=) of 15

Fife scores just below the median on Inclusive Growth indicators, equal 9 th with a number of other areas (North Lanarkshire, Dundee and Aberdeenshire).

Growth has been strong overall in Fife over the past decade or so, with Gross Value Added estimated to have risen by 10% between 2004 and 2014. More recently GVA has risen by 3.2% on average annually over 2010 to 2014. GVA per worker (£41,750) is around the median amongst the 15 Phase 2 Local Authorities.

In general, Fife scores at or above the median across most of the Inclusive Growth indicators. Fife has a relatively high business birth rate but scores less well on economic diversity, having the highest proportion of GVA generated in the Business Administration and Support and Public Administration sectors. The unemployment rate in Fife also fell significantly (by 3.1%) between 2015 and 2016.

Regeneration – Equality and Poverty – Rank 10 of 15

Fife has relatively modest levels of deprivation, although there are pockets of deprivation in some areas. 19% of its SIMD datazones are among the 20% most deprived in Scotland, the 10 th highest percentage of any Local Authority in Scotland. Over 20% of Fife's SIMD datazones are among the 20% least deprived in Scotland. Fife's population has risen by 4.3% between 2005 and 2015, this compares to some other deprived areas which have seen declines in population indicating long-term decline.

Fife has a concentration of deprived datazones in Kirkcaldy, Glenrothes and the Levenmouth are, as well as some of the former mining villages. More affluent areas are mostly located in the north east of Fife.

Contribution to Local Delivery – Dignity and Respect – Rank 4 of 15

In November 2016, there were around 33,200 people claiming disability benefits ( DLA/ PIP/ AA) - which is the 5 th highest level amongst Phase 2 Local Authorities - making up 9% of total population of Fife. There were 5,120 people claiming Carers Allowance (the 3 rd highest level amongst Phase 2 Local Authorities).

5.11 Falkirk

Ability to Recruit – Implementability and Risk – Rank 10 of 15

Falkirk is a relatively small Local Authority, with a population of around 158,500 people. Of these, around 79,500 are working age and economically active, which means that they are either in employment or are available and actively looking for employment. Around 890 have been claiming out of work benefits such as JSA and UC for less than 12 months.

The urban population of the Local Authority is concentrated in Falkirk (35,310), with other significant populations in Grangemouth (17,280) and Bo'ness (14,910).

Falkirk could attract a labour force from Edinburgh and Glasgow as well other central belt Local Authorities. However, when even taking this into account Falkirk is ranked at or around the median across most Access to Labour Force indicators. Its overall score for the Ability to Recruit criteria is pushed below the median by its scores on Skill Shortage indicators. For example, around 10% of businesses are reported to have at least one vacancy that is hard to fill, which is the second highest rate amongst Phase 2 Local Authorities.

Inclusive Growth – Economy and Environment - Rank 2(=) of 15

Growth has been weak in Falkirk over the past decade or so, with Gross Value Added estimated to have fallen by 7% between 2004 and 2014. More recently GVA has again fallen by 0.3% on average annually over 2010 to 2014. GVA per worker (£38,100) is amongst the lowest across Phase 2 Local Authorities.

In addition to poor GVA growth, Falkirk also scores poorly on Business Creation indicators, such as its business rate, and economic diversity indicators. For example, around 29% of those employed work in the public sector, compared to an average of 25% across Phase 2 Local Authorities.

Regeneration – Equality and Poverty – Rank 11 of 15

Falkirk has relatively modest levels of deprivation, although there are severe pockets of deprivation in some areas. 15% of its SIMD datazones are among the 20% most deprived in Scotland and around 19% of Falkirk's SIMD datazones are among the 20% least deprived in Scotland. Falkirk's population has risen by 5.5% between 2005 and 2015, which is 6 th highest population growth rate among the fifteen Local Authorities.

According to the SIMD measure, Falkirk has concentrations of deprived datazones within Falkirk itself and neighbouring Grangemouth.

Contribution to Local Delivery – Dignity and Respect – Rank 11(=) of 15

In November 2016, there were around 15,200 people claiming disability benefits ( DLA/ PIP/ AA) - which is the 5 th highest level amongst Phase 2 Local Authorities - making up 9.6% of total population of Falkirk. There were 2,190 people claiming Carers Allowance (the 3 rd highest level amongst Phase 2 Local Authorities).

5.12 West Lothian

Ability to Recruit – Implementability and Risk – Rank 6(=) of 15

West Lothian's population is around 178,600 people. Of these, around 89,700 are working age and economically active, which means that they are either in employment or are available and actively looking for employment. Around 1,230 have been claiming out of work benefits such as JSA and UC for less than 12 months.

The urban population of West Lothian is concentrated in Livingston (56,570), Bathgate (21,070), Broxburn (15,360) and Linlithgow (13,320).

Workforce could commute from Edinburgh, North and South Lanarkshire and Midlothian. West Lothian scores well against measures related to skills and education, with 77% of 16-64 year olds with SCQF5 qualifications compared to a median of 72.5%. It also scores well against vacancies and skills gap indicators.

Inclusive Growth – Economy and Environment - Rank 4(=) of 15

Growth has been weak in West Lothian over the past decade or so, with Gross Value Added estimated to have fallen by 1% between 2004 and 2014. More recently GVA has risen by 0.5% on average annually over 2010 to 2014. GVA per worker (£41,400) and is just below the median across Phase 2 Local Authorities (£41,750).

West Lothian score relatively well against most Inclusive Growth indicators. West Lothian's recent fall in the unemployment rate between 2015 and 2016, relatively high employment rate (75%) and relatively strong employment projections reduce West Lothian's overall score for Inclusive Growth closer to the median.

Regeneration – Equality and Poverty – Rank 12 of 15

West Lothian has relatively modest levels of deprivation, although there are severe pockets of deprivation in some areas. 16% of its SIMD datazones are among the 20% most deprived in Scotland and around 19% of West Lothian's SIMD datazones are among the 20% least deprived in Scotland. West Lothian's population has risen by 8.2% between 2005 and 2015, which is the largest percentage increase of any Local Authority with the exception of Edinburgh and Aberdeen.

Contribution to Local Delivery – Dignity and Respect – Rank 11(=) of 15

In November 2016, there were around 17,300 people claiming disability benefits ( DLA/ PIP/ AA), making up around 10% of total population of West Lothian. There were 2,380 people claiming Carers Allowance.

5.13 City of Edinburgh

Ability to Recruit – Implementability and Risk – Rank 2 of 15

Edinburgh has a population of 498,800 people. Of these, around 253,400 are working age and economically active, which means that they are either in employment or are available and actively looking for employment. Around 2,880 have been claiming out of work benefits such as JSA and UC for less than 12 months.

Edinburgh is the third most densely populated Local Authority in Scotland, with only Glasgow and Dundee having higher population densities. It is also able to attract workforce from a number of Local Authorities around it, such as Falkirk, Fife, West Lothian, South Lanarkshire, Midlothian, Scottish Borders and East Lothian, which is reflected in the adjusted Access to Labour Force indicators.

Edinburgh performs well against most of the Access to Labour Force indicators. It is second only to Glasgow in terms of working-age population size and employment in sectors and occupations similar to future agency staff. Edinburgh also scores well on skills and education, having the highest proportion of 16-64 year olds with SCQF5 or higher qualifications.

Inclusive Growth – Economy and Environment - Rank 14 of 15

Growth has been relatively strong overall in Edinburgh over the past decade or so, with Gross Value Added estimated to have risen by 9% between 2004 and 2014. More recently GVA has risen by 1.8% on average annually over 2010 to 2014. GVA per worker (£48,720) in Edinburgh is the second highest of all Local Authorities.

As well as strong growth, Edinburgh has some of the strongest employment expansion demand in the occupations similar to that of future agency staff, and the business birth rate is one of the highest of any Local Authority.

Regeneration – Equality and Poverty – Rank 13 of 15

Edinburgh has relatively low levels of deprivation, although there are some deprived areas. Overall, around 14% of its SIMD datazones are among the 20% most deprived in Scotland and over 40% of Edinburgh's SIMD datazones are among the 20% least deprived in Scotland. Edinburgh's population has risen by 11% between 2005 and 2015, the biggest percentage increases in population of any Local Authority.

As measured by SIMD, deprived areas in Edinburgh are concentrated in the outer area of the City such as Sighthill, Saughton, Broomhouse, Muirhouse, West Pilton, Leith, Craigmillar and Gracemount.

Contribution to Local Delivery – Dignity and Respect – Rank 11(=) of 15

In November 2016, there were around 33,500 people claiming disability benefits ( DLA/ PIP/ AA) making up 6.7% of total population of Aberdeen. There were 4,330 people claiming Carers Allowance.

5.14 Aberdeenshire

Ability to Recruit – Implementability and Risk – Rank 11 of 15

Aberdeenshire is the largest Local Authority by land area in Phase 2 and has a population of 262,000 people, widely dispersed across the area. Of these, around 138,300 are working age and economically active, which means that they are either in employment or are available and actively looking for employment. Around 1,600 have been claiming out of work benefits such as JSA and UC for less than 12 months.

The population of Aberdeenshire is mainly rural, with concentrations of less than 20,000 people in Peterhead (18,450), Fraserburgh (13,140), Inverurie (12,760), Westhill (11,600) and Stonehaven (11,370). Towns closer to the Aberdeen labour market would be more feasible as a possible agency location.

Aberdeenshire scores below the median on Access to Labour Force indicators due to low population density and low employment in related sectors such as business administration and public administration. Aberdeenshire scores particularly well however against the Skills and Education indicator, with, for example, the highest percentage of school leavers in positive destinations. Scores against Skill Shortage indicators are also above average.

Inclusive Growth – Economy and Environment - Rank 9(=) of 15

Growth has been very strong in Aberdeenshire over the past decade or so, with Gross Value Added estimated to have risen by 54% between 2004 and 2014 (second only to Aberdeen City). More recently GVA has risen by 4% on average annually over 2010 to 2014. GVA per worker (£42,150) is just above the median amongst the Phase 2 Local Authorities.

Despite historically strong economic performance, the recent downturn in the oil and gas sector is reflected in a 3% rise in the unemployment rate in Aberdeenshire between 2015 and 2016 (an increase only second only to Aberdeen City). Aberdeenshire also scores well on economic diversity, with the lowest share of public sector employees per working-age population across all Phase 2 Local Authorities.

Regeneration – Equality and Poverty – Rank 14(=) of 15

Aberdeenshire has low levels of deprivation. Only 2% of its SIMD datazones are among the 20% most deprived in Scotland, the lowest percentage of any Local Authority in Scotland. Over 35% of Aberdeenshire's SIMD datazones are among the 20% least deprived in Scotland. Aberdeenshire's population has risen by 10.3% between 2005 and 2015. This is one of the biggest increases in population of any Local Authority.

Contribution to Local Delivery – Dignity and Respect – Rank 14(=) of 15

In November 2016, there were around 14,500 people claiming disability benefits ( DLA/ PIP/ AA) making up 5.5% of total population of Aberdeenshire, the lowest claimant concentration across all Phase 2 Local Authorities. There were 1,780 people claiming Carers Allowance.

5.15 Aberdeen City

Ability to Recruit – Implementability and Risk – Rank 4(=) of 15

Aberdeen City has a population of approximately 230,000 people. Of these, around 121,800 are working age and economically active, which means that they are either in employment or are available and actively looking for employment. Around 2,245 have been claiming out of work benefits such as JSA and UC for less than 12 months.

As a city, Aberdeen is one of the most densely populated Local Authorities in Scotland.

Aberdeen scores relatively poorly on some Access to Labour Force indicators but better on others. For example, there is a low employment level in similar sectors to agency staff, but a relatively high population density. Aberdeen also scores well against skills and education indicators and Skill Shortages indicators.

Inclusive Growth – Economy and Environment - Rank 15 of 15

Aberdeen City is the lowest scoring Local Authority against Inclusive Growth indicators.

Growth has been very strong overall in Aberdeen over the past decade or so, with Gross Value Added estimated to have risen by 56% between 2004 and 2014. More recently GVA has risen by 4% on average annually over 2010 to 2014. GVA per worker (£55,397) is the highest of any Local Authority.

Despite historically strong economic performance, the recent downturn in the oil and gas sector is reflected in a 3.3% rise in the unemployment rate and 6% fall in the number of employees between 2015 and 2016. However, Aberdeen City also has the highest percentage of businesses with more than 100 employees and a high business birth rate.

Regeneration – Equality and Poverty – Rank 14(=) of 15

Aberdeen City has relatively low levels of deprivation. Around 8% of its SIMD datazones are among the 20% most deprived in Scotland and nearly 40% of Aberdeen City's SIMD datazones are among the 20% least deprived in Scotland. Aberdeenshire's population has risen by 10.4% between 2005 and 2015, one of the biggest increases in population of any Local Authority.

Contribution to Local Delivery – Dignity and Respect – Rank 14(=) of 15

In November 2016, there were around 14,400 people claiming disability benefits ( DLA/ PIP/ AA) making up 6.3% of total population of Aberdeen City. There were 1,450 people claiming Carers Allowance.


Contact

Email: Leila Akhoundova, leila.akhoundova@gov.scot

Phone: 0300 244 4000 – Central Enquiry Unit

The Scottish Government
St Andrew's House
Regent Road
Edinburgh
EH1 3DG