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Publication - Research publication

Early learning and childcare at age five: comparing two cohorts

A report on early learning and childcare use and provision in Scotland, comparing Growing Up in Scotland data from 2008-09 and 2014.

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Contents
Early learning and childcare at age five: comparing two cohorts
7 References

7 References

Bradshaw, P. and Tipping, S. (2010) Growing Up in Scotland: Children's social, emotional and behavioural characteristics at entry to primary school, Edinburgh: Scottish Government.

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Bradshaw, P., Hall, J., Hill, T., Mabelis, J. and Philo, D. (2012) Growing Up in Scotland: Early experiences of Primary School, Edinburgh: Scottish Government.

Bradshaw, P. and Corbett, J. (2013) Growing Up in Scotland: Birth Cohort 2, Sweep 1: User Guide.
Available at: http://doc.ukdataservice.ac.uk/doc/7432/mrdoc/pdf/7432_gus_bc2_sw1_user_guide.pdf

Bradshaw, P., Lewis, G. and Hughes, T. (2014) Growing Up in Scotland: Characteristics of pre-school provision and their association with child outcomes, Edinburgh, Scottish Government.

Bradshaw, P., Knudsen, L. and Mabelis, J. (2015) Growing Up in Scotland: Circumstances and Experiences of 3-year-old Children Living in Scotland in 2007/08 and 2013, Edinburgh: Scottish Government.

Bradshaw, P. and Tipping, S. (2010) Growing Up in Scotland: Children's social, emotional and behavioural characteristics at entry to primary school. Edinburgh: Scottish Government.
Available at: http://www.gov.scot/Publications/2010/04/26102809/0

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Available at: http://www.gov.scot/Resource/Doc/263884/0079032.pdf

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