beta

You're viewing our new website - find out more

Publication - Statistics Publication

Children in families with limited resources across Scotland 2014-2016

Published: 28 Nov 2017

New estimates of the proportion of children in combined low income and material deprivation by council area and household characteristics.

15 page PDF

3.6MB

15 page PDF

3.6MB

Contents
Children in families with limited resources across Scotland 2014-2016
Which Necessities

15 page PDF

3.6MB

Which Necessities

"My kettle blew up, so I went and got a kettle off my catalogue. Cause I wouldn't have been able to afford to just go and buy a kettle. And I didn't want to say to anybody, 'I can't afford a kettle.' Ken, people are coming in for a cup of tea and that, and 'oh my kettle's blew up, and I can't afford another one'..."
Mary

Household necessities

Percentage of children who live in families that cannot afford each necessity.

Why these items?

This list is based on what most people agree is a basic necessity, and it provides a robust material deprivation measure.

Access to £500 to cover an unexpected, but necessary, expense 34%
Enough money to make regular payments into a pension 27%
Enough money to save regularly (of at least £20) for rainy days 26%
Enough money to repair/replace broken electrical goods 21%
Enough money to take part in a hobby 19%
Enough money to take part in sport/exercise activities 17%
Home contents insurance 15%
All recommended dental work/treatment 13%
Enough money to keep home in a decent state of decoration 10%
A damp free home 8%
Appropriate clothes for job interviews 7%

Child necessities

"I've got to go to the library because we don't have a computer at home and I've had to hand in homework late or rush it and it hasn't been the best because I've only been able to get there at lunch or break and sometimes I've got to skip lunch to make sure I get the work done"
Jamie (12 years old)

Percentage of children who live in families that cannot afford each necessity.

Why these items?

This list is based on what most people agree is a basic necessity, and it provides a robust material deprivation measure.

Child has money to save 21%
A holiday away from home at least once a year 20%
Day trips with family once a month 14%
Child gets pocket money 11%
A bedroom for every child aged 10 or older of different sex 10%
Attending toddler groups etc. at least once a week 6%
Access to a computer and internet for homework 5%
A garden or outdoor space nearby to play safely 5%
Some new, not second-hand clothes 2%
A warm winter coat 2%
At least four pairs of trousers, leggings, jeans etc. 1%

Contact