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Child Poverty (Scotland) Bill: children's rights and wellbeing impact assessment

Published: 14 Feb 2017

Scottish Government's assessment of the impacts on children's rights and wellbeing of the Child Poverty (Scotland) Bill.

23 page PDF

482.9kB

23 page PDF

482.9kB

Contents
Child Poverty (Scotland) Bill: children's rights and wellbeing impact assessment
Footnotes

23 page PDF

482.9kB

Footnotes

1. Relative poverty is a measure of whether the incomes of the poorest are increasing in line with middle income households. Individuals are said to be in relative poverty if they are living in households whose equivalised income is below 60 per cent of UK median income in that year.

2. http://www.gov.scot/Resource/0050/00502180.pdf

3. Combined low income and child material deprivation is an additional way of measuring living standards and refers to the inability of households to afford basic goods and activities that are seen as necessities in society. It is a more direct measure of poverty than income alone, as it captures changes in standard of living.

4. Absolute poverty is a measure of whether income for the lowest income households is keeping pace with inflation. Individuals are said to be living in absolute poverty if they are living in households whose equivalised income is below 60 per cent of the (inflation adjusted) median income in 2010/11.

5. https://www.ifs.org.uk/uploads/publications/comms/R114.pdf

6. Relative poverty is a measure of whether the incomes of the poorest are increasing in line with middle income households. Individuals are said to be in relative poverty if they are living in households whose equivalised income is below 60 per cent of UK median income in that year.

7. http://www.gov.scot/Resource/0050/00502180.pdf

8. Combined low income and child material deprivation is an additional way of measuring living standards and refers to the inability of households to afford basic goods and activities that are seen as necessities in society. It is a more direct measure of poverty than income alone, as it captures changes in standard of living.

9. Absolute poverty is a measure of whether income for the lowest income households is keeping pace with inflation. Individuals are said to be living in absolute poverty if they are living in households whose equivalised income is below 60 per cent of the (inflation adjusted) median income in 2010/11.

10. https://www.ifs.org.uk/uploads/publications/comms/R114.pdf


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