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Publication - Report

Community benefits in public procurement

Published: 19 Feb 2008
Part of:
Public sector
ISBN:
9780755956128

This report presents the findings of a pilot programme which was intended to promote the use of 'community benefit'.

82 page PDF

600.5kB

82 page PDF

600.5kB

Contents
Community benefits in public procurement
APPENDIX 2: RAPLOCH CASE STUDY

82 page PDF

600.5kB

APPENDIX 2: RAPLOCH CASE STUDY

RAPLOCH URBAN REGENERATION COMPANY (STIRLING)

A2.1 Procurement - Stirling Western Access Road ( SWAR)

The SWAR contract was for the building of a road that would effectively take through traffic around Raploch. The procurement process commenced before the staff of the Shadow URC came into post and a contract Notice was published without reference to community benefit requirements 73 but respondents to the public notice were advised that they would be required to demonstrate how they would deliver community benefit requirements. 74 The following extract is from the contract conditions and form of tender:

"In accordance with the Stirling Community Plan and the objectives of the Raploch Partnership the client is seeking to maximise the contribution of the Stirling Western Access Road contract to social inclusion. It is therefore a requirement that the Community Benefits Method Statement that is included at Appendix E to Form of Tender is completed and returned with each valid tender.

The Community Benefits Method Statement will form part of the Tender assessment. This will be carried out in a two-stage threshold basis:

Stage 1: Community Benefits Method Statement must be deemed acceptable before proceeding through to Stage 2. 75

Stage 2: Base on lowest compliant and satisfactory tender price." 76

The requirements were further explained at a briefing session for the seven contractors that expressed an interest in bidding for the works.

The targeted recruitment and training requirements in the contract were based on the Draft CBIP Toolkit but amended during the course of discussions between the Raploch team and the procurement team from Stirling Council. Changes suggested by the latter related, in particular, to the number of trainees and the duration of the site work that should be required, and the removal of requirements relating to SME supply-chain opportunities. 77 In both cases the rationale for reducing the requirements was based on the procurement team's judgement on what targeted training and recruitment requirements could be delivered within the scale and duration of the contract.

As indicated above each bidder had to provide with their tender a Community Benefit Method Statement using a pro-forma provided. This was required to show how the contractor would achieve the following requirements:

  • Fully participate in a Community Benefits Working Group;
  • Participate in the training programme of four people identified by the Community Benefits Working Group partners and provide a total of 52 person-weeks of appropriate sire experience to the trainees;
  • Within one week of commencement on site, in consultation with the Community Benefits Working Group partners, to complete a written training plan for each trainee that will lead to some or all of the following:
    • Construction industry certification
    • Civil engineering road works certification
    • Plant operations
    • Plant maintenance
    • Highways and utilities operations
    • Health and safety
    • The enhancement of the trainee's personal, IT and job-search skills;
  • The training plan to be updated monthly and available for inspection at any time;
  • Each trainee to be encouraged and assisted in securing permanent employment or support in setting up as a self-employed person, including consideration for employment on site;
  • Every vacancy, including those with sub-contractors, to be notified to the Community Benefits Working Group and the Community Benefits Development Manager at least 2 days before being notified to other agencies or filled from other sources;
  • To interview a minimum of three candidates put forward by Employment Connections or Employability Stirling 78 (where suitable candidates are put forward) before making a recruitment selection;
  • Operate a formal complaints procedure in relation to incidents of discrimination;
  • Maintain a Site Personnel Record (including full home address, employer, start and finish dates on site) that includes a statement allowing the employer to disclose personal information to the Contracting Authority, i.e. Stirling Council for contract monitoring purposes; 79
  • Maintain insurance for people aged 16 and over who are gaining work experience on site.

The invitation to tender also included the following 'disclaimer':

"The inclusion of community benefit requirements does not comprise or imply any promise on the part of the Employer 80 or their agents or the Raploch Partnership (Shadow URC) to provide suitable trainees or labour. Within this context the employer and the Raploch Partnership will work with agencies to help facilitate the achievement of these community benefit requirements."

As can be seen above the principle community benefit required from the SWAR contract was the provision of a minimum of 52 weeks of work experience and training for a minimum of 4 trainees recruited through the partners in the Raploch Community Benefits Working Group This was considered a condition that could be met by any contractor.

A key characteristic of the Raploch approach was that the trainees were 'free on site' to the contractor. They were selected (after a newspaper advertisement) from a population that were eligible for the Jobcentre Plus New Deal programme (for long-term unemployed people aged under 25) or the Work Based Training For Work programme (long-term unemployed people aged 25+). The Jobcentre funding was matched to European Social Fund money to provide additional resources. This funding was accessed through a local programme called Joblink that was run by Employment Connections. Raploch URC did not take responsibility for recruitment of the trainees required.

Joblink is an employer-based programme where the participants are selected to meet an Employer's specification and then go through a bespoke training programme that will help provide the participants with the skills and qualifications that the employer requires. In this case the contractors appointed for the SWAR had to participate as an employer.

The trainees retained their state benefits during their training and site experience and received an additional £10 per week plus a travel and subsistence allowance.

The contractor worked with the partners in the Community Benefits Working Group - that included the Community Benefits development manager from the URC and Employment Connections - to devise a training programme. This set out day by day for the 13 weeks what the trainees would be doing and included:

  • 10 days of pre-site training that included health and safety, manual handling, vehicle banksman operations and use of abrasive wheels;
  • 41 days of site work experience;
  • 7 days of additional off-site training;
  • days of personal development training and support;
  • 2 days of interview and exit review activity.

The training was provided by an organisation that is regularly used by the contractor but was paid for by Joblink.

The Working Group met monthly over the duration of the contract to review the progress with the training programme.

The results of the process were outstanding. At the conclusion of the first 13-week programme all four trainees were employed by the contractor, Stirling Council Roads Maintenance ( SCRM). They then took a further four trainees for 13 weeks, of which one was employed by SCRM and two elsewhere in Stirling Council. So the contractor delivered double the contractual requirements - in part because they were willing to place the trainees on other contracts as well as the SWAR - and 87.5% of the participants moved from long-term unemployment to a permanent job.

From the contractor's perspective the incorporation of the training requirements in the contract reminded them that there could be benefits in giving opportunities to people that would normally be considered difficult to place in employment. This example demonstrated that with the right support in place the hiring of long-term unemployed people could actually enhance a contract rather than being a difficulty. SCRM had complied with the contract requirements because they needed to maintain a good relationship with their clients, but the process supported a business need which was to recruit more staff to service their expanding business. The provision of the trainees 'free on site' and with good training and support effectively gave them a 13-week assessment period prior to the actual recruitment. 81

From the Employment Connections perspective the inclusion of the community benefit requirements in the contract significantly increased the efficiency of the Joblink provision. On this contract they were able to place 8 trainees with one contractor. Normally they would have to work with 4 ormore contractors to achieve the same outputs.

A2.2 Procurement of a Development Partner

The major procurement being undertaken by the URC is for a development partner that will 'deliver the Board's vision' (for Raploch) and specifically undertake housing renewal (800 units) and public realm works. The OJEU Notice gave an estimated value of £75m for the works and includes the following statement in relation to Community Benefits.

The partner will be expected to embrace the concept of sustainable development and community benefit and will be required to work with the partners to deliver employment/training opportunities and other Community Benefits.

This text makes clear that the delivery of Community Benefits - and specifically employment and training - is part of the subject of the contract that is being procured.

Respondents to the OJEU Notice were invited to a Bidders Conference where the requirements - including the community benefit requirements - were discussed. Documentation provided at the conference included a Pre-Qualification Questionnaire ( PQQ) that included the following:

"Community Benefit

The Applicant should demonstrate previous involvement in community benefit initiatives such as:

  • supporting economic development
  • community consultation/capacity building
  • training and employment opportunities
  • partnership work with local people and other appropriate local agencies

Please provide the CV(s) of person/persons responsible for delivery of Community Benefits/partnership working in your organisation."

This text illustrates that in this procurement 'Community Benefits' extended beyond employment and training to incorporate community consultation, community capacity building and partnership working.

The PQQs were evaluated by a multi-disciplinary panel that included the URC's Community Benefits development officer. The latter prepared a scoring sheet describing the types of information that could be expected to be provided in relation to question 3.4. Each member of the panel scored each response to the PQQ independently. These scores were then combined within a weighted framework.

As can be seen from Table 1 their highest scoring responses to the PQQ overall were also the highest scoring in relation to the community benefit questions. These three were invited to tender for the contract.

Table 1 - PQQ Scoring: comparison of overall ranking and Community Benefits ranking

PQQ Scoring - All Questions

PQQ Scoring - Community Benefits

Rank

Average Score

Rank

Average Score

1

75

3

61

2

73

1=

73

3

69

1=

73

4

55

6

41

5

54

4

58

6

53

5

42

7

30

7

18

The Invitation to Tender ( ITT), below, included community benefit requirements relating to training and employment, equal opportunities, social enterprises, small business, monitoring and reporting, sub-contractor compliance, and insurances, plus the disclaimer (similar to that used in the SWAR contract). Each bidder was required to provide information on these matters on a pro-forma method statement that was included in the ITT information (see below). The use of the standard questions and format was intended to make it easier to evaluate the community benefit proposals from the bidders, although on this occasion only one of the bidders completed the pro-forma.

The evaluation of the bids was undertaken by 5 panels, including one for the Community Benefits. The latter consisted of the principal public sector bodies with an interest in regeneration (including social housing, training, and health) plus the Council, the URC's Community Benefits development manager (who chaired the panel) and a representative from the local community. The other four panels scored the bids on Technical, Finance, Legal, and Innovation criteria.

Each section of the Method Statement was given a score out of 100 (see Table 2). Each question within each section was then given a score.

Having established this scoring framework each member of the panel scored each of the three Method Statements. The panel met to validate the scores they had given. 82 The scores of the different panel members were combined and an average of all panel members produced. This average score was passed to the external consultants who combined it with the scores for other elements of the bid coming from other panels. The community benefit scores were weighted as 10% of the overall scores.

As can be seen from Table 2 the highest community benefit weighting was given to the information relating to training and targeted recruitment. Bidders were scored most highly on their responses to questions about equal opportunities and their management arrangements. They scored significantly less well on the information they provided about the net cost of meeting the community benefit requirements.

The preferred bidder overall was scored second-highest by the Community Benefits scoring panel.

Table 2 -Scoring the Community Benefits Method Statements

Section of Method Statement

Weighting %

Average score of bidders

Highest score of bidders

Training opportunities

35

65.8

78.5

Targeted recruitment

20

67.2

75.5

Equal opportunities

5

80.0

92.0

Social enterprises

10

66.7

76.0

Small Businesses

10

63.6

74.0

Monitoring and reporting

10

66.0

80.0

Performance information

5

60.6

78.0

Management

2

75.0

95.0

Cost information

3

58.9

66.6

Total for the CB Method Statement

100

66.4

76.3

An examination of the method statements submitted by the bidders shows dramatic differences in their predicted outcomes (against the community benefit requirements) and the costs they included in the tender.

Clarification with the preferred bidder suggests that contractors may have over-complicated their response to the community benefit requirements rather than merely responding to the questions that were asked. The approach to cost was especially significant. The Method Statement, (see below), actually asked for the net cost after deducting grants obtained and the value of work undertaken. Only one of the three bidders appears to have worked on this basis, while the others showed the predicted financial benefit to the community rather than the net cost to the client. 83

The difference in 'cost' shown in the community benefit method statement was not carried forward to the total cost submitted by each bidder and did not impact on the award of the contract. 84

This outcome suggests that despite the initial briefing for potential bidders and the offer of the opportunity to request more information at the bidding stage, some bidders will not address the requirements in the tender and provide the information that is requested through a pro-forma method statement. In this context it is important to ensure that community benefit requirements are costed in bids in a uniform way.

The successful developer, R3 (a Cruden Homes/George Wimpey consortium) signed-up to:

1 225 Training and Employment new entrant places over the 10-year programme
2 Support and mentoring for small businesses
3 Ring-fencing of £2 million for suitable sub-contracting works
4 Support and mentoring for social enterprises - £900K ring-fenced to take forward projects

A2.3 Critical Success Factors

The URC's Community Benefits Development Manager was previously the manager of Joblink in Stirling and therefore has long experience of seeking training and job opportunities for long-term unemployed people from contractors working on major projects in the City. Where employment and training requirements were put into the procurement process and the works contract a much more positive engagement was obtained from the contractor than experienced for voluntary arrangements.

It might be assumed that the SWAR example may be atypical since the contractor was a part of Stirling Council. However, despite Joblink having operated for many years as part of the Council the contractor had not previously sought to recruit from this source. It might also be fair to comment that it is too early to judge the impact of the community benefit requirements in the development partner contract since nothing had been delivered at the time of writing. Raploch URC also believe that testing community benefit clauses on the SWAR contract helped with their use in the main contract.

In this case the contractor benefited from the experience and resources of Employment Connections and their Joblink project. They had already packaged the resources from Jobcentre Plus and the European Social Fund to allow the SWAR contractor to have access to trainees at no cost, and had a well-established system for recruiting and supporting the trainees and their employer. The URCs lead worker had an intimate knowledge and good relationships with Joblink, and the contractor had good experience of purchasing appropriate training.

The URC wanted to have a greater involvement in the selection of short-lists than Joblink are accustomed to, with candidates potentially coming from several sources not just Joblink and Employment Connections.

Another critical ingredient for the SWAR contract was the operation of the Community Benefits working Group. This provided a forum for integrating the training and resource knowledge of Employment Connections and Joblink with the detailed construction programme and road operations training knowledge of the contractor. It provided a positive forum for discussion of issues and outcomes, and provided the contractor with the assurance that they were operating in a supportive environment: they were not left on their own to deliver the requirements and sort any problems.

The experience of the Working Group for the SWAR contract has given the URC confidence that a similar approach can work with the development partner. This will be important because there is a wider range of requirements that need to be addressed, and because over a longer contract period there will be changes in the resources available for training and job-matching - a problem that was not encountered in the 30-week SWAR contract.

The scoring of the PQQ and Method Statements for the development partner contract has been a very significant learning process for all those concerned. None had previous experience of scoring Community Benefits in such a rigorous way. The contribution of the local resident was especially important since they remained very focused on how the proposals of the bidders would work in the community. The process enabled the community benefit requirements set out in the OJEU Notice to be part of the award process.

In relation to value for money the judgement in relation to the SWAR is that the inclusion of the Community Benefits requirements increased value for money since additional client objectives were met at nil cost - or even a reduction in cost - to the client. This was achieved because the trainees were 'free on site' and any additional supervision costs were covered by their 328 days of site work.

A good practice lesson is that where multi-faceted community benefit requirements are to be included in the tender process there needs to be strong guidance given on what is expected.

A2.4 EXTRACTS FROM RAPLOCH TENDER DOCUMENTATION

Part 10

Community Benefit Conditions

1 Training and Employment

1.1 Employed status new entrant trainees will comprise either a minimum of 10% of the person-weeks required to deliver the works or a minimum of 157 (no.) whichever is the greater, and that wherever possible such new entrant trainees will be recruited from Employment Connections, EmployAbility Stirling or another agency named by the URCwhere:

a) A person-week is the equivalent of one person working for 5 days either on site, or through a mix of on-site work and off-site training. The total person-weeks utilised on the contract to include time provided by management and professional staff, trades and operative staff, and ancillary staff.

b) A new entrant trainee is a person that is leaving an educational establishment ( e.g. school, college or university) or a training provider, or a non-employed person that is seeking employment that includes on-site training and assessment or offsite training, or a mix of these.

c) "Employment Connections" is an employment and training information project with offices at 4 Woodside Road, Raploch, Stirling, FK8 1RF.

d) "EmployAbility Stirling" is an advice employment project for those with disabilities, with offices at Langgarth, Viewforth, Stirling FK8 2ET.

1.2 Each new entrant trainee is to have a written Training Plan. This Training Plan is to be updated on a monthly basis and made available for inspection by the client representative at any time.

1.3 Every vacancy on site, including those with sub-contractors, is to be notified to Employment Connections and EmployAbility Stirling (and/or other agencies named by the client representative 85 ).

1.4 Provide unwaged work experience places for those people participating in national construction training programmes such as New Deal Training for Work, Skillseekers and Modern Apprenticeships.

1.5 Provide employment opportunities for people with a disability, wherever possible recruited from EmployAbility Stirling (and/or other agencies named by the client representative). 86

2 Equal Opportunities

2.1 In response to the Race Relations (Amendment) Act 2000 the Developer must implement equal opportunities practices on site that satisfy the following minimum requirements:

2.2 All vacancies on site to be notified to Employment Connections and EmployAbility Stirling and/or other agency named by the client representative.

2.3 The operation of a formal complaints procedure, backed up by appropriate disciplinary action, for incidents of discrimination or abuse relating to race, colour, gender, religion, age and disability: this procedure to be made known to all personnel on site and to include records that are available for inspection by the client or their agent at any time.

3 Social Enterprises

3.1 The URC supports the Scottish Government's policy onsocial enterprises, (see the notes on social enterprises included as an Addendum to this Part of the Schedule) and believes that social enterprises have a distinct and valuable role to play in helping to create a strong, sustainable and socially inclusive economy. It is therefore a requirement that the following actions for the development of social enterprises in the Raploch area are undertaken:

3.1.1 Investigate and discuss social enterprise opportunities with the client representative.

3.1.2 Make proposals on how sustainable social enterprises can be created and developed within Raploch.

3.1.3 Take appropriate action to support the creation, development and good management of social enterprises in Raploch. 87

4 Small Businesses

4.1 The contractor is required to provide opportunities for small businesses, ( SBs), wherever possible identified through Forthconstruction Forum or other named agencies. It is therefore a requirement that each year the capacity of a number of additional SMEs is assessed and activities undertaken to develop their capacity to undertake work on the Raploch developments. In complying with this condition: 88

4.1.1 An SB is a firm that employs or otherwise engages less than 50 people.

4.1.2 "Forthconstruction Forum" is an initiative to assist SBs, which is based at Stirling Council Economic Development, Viewforth, Stirling FK8 2ET.

5 Monitoring and Reporting

5.1 The contractor is required to maintain a Site Security Record that includes the following data for each person engaged on site in any capacity:

5.1.1 The date they commenced on Site.

5.1.2 Their home address (rather than a local accommodation address) including the full post-code.

5.1.3 Their employer (or who they have been engaged by if self-employed).

5.1.4 Their trade/occupation.

5.1.5 The date they finished working on Site.

5.2 The contractor is required to comply with the Data Protection Act and the Site Security Record must include a statement authorising the contractor to disclose personal data from the Site Security Record to the URC or their agent for the purposes of contract monitoring. This statement is to be signed by each person listed on the SiteSecurity Record.

5.3 The Site Security Record must be available to the client representative or their agent at any time.

5.4 Prior to each Monthly Site Meeting the contractor must prepare a schedule showing outcomes for each of the following for both the Month and cumulatively.

5.4.1 Person-weeks delivered by new entrant trainees split between those from named agencies and others.

5.4.2 Number of new entrant trainees that have been recruited split between those from named agencies and others.

5.4.3 Person-weeks delivered by people with a disability.

5.4.4 No. of vacancies notified to the named agencies.

5.4.5 No. of vacancies filled by persons referred by the named agencies.

5.4.6 Total value of support to social enterprises.

5.4.7 Value of funding provided to social enterprises.

5.4.8 Number of additional SBs that have been assessed as a potential supplier split between those contacted via Forthconstruction Forum* and others. 89

5.4.9 Number of orders placed with 'additional SBs', split between those contacted via Forthconstruction Forum* and others.

5.4.10 Value of contracts placed with additional SBs, split between those contacted via Forthconstruction Forum*, and others.

* or another named organisation/list

5.5 The contractor/consortium must have available for inspection at any time, evidence to support the information given to the Monthly Site Meeting. This will be subject to periodic review.

6 Sub-contractor Compliance

It is the contractor/consortium's responsibility to develop a working method that will deliver the Community Benefit requirements and the related records and monitoring data, and obtain the full co-operation of sub-contractors.

7 Insurances

The Developer must provide insurance that includes cover for people aged 16 and over and for staff from employment and training organisations when visiting the site.

8 Action by the URC

The inclusion of Community Benefit requirements does not comprise or imply any promise on the part of the URC or their agents to provide suitable trainees, labour or SBs. Any action taken by the URC to broker relationships between the contractor/consortium and local individuals/firms/ agencies does not imply and should not be deemed to imply that the URC or their agents consider the individual/firm/ agency as suitable for engagement by the contractor/ consortium. Within this context the URC will work with local agencies to help facilitate the achievement of these Community Benefits requirements.

Addendum to Section 10

Social enterprise explained

A social enterprise is a business with primarily social objectives whose surpluses are principally reinvested for that purpose in the business or in the community rather than being driven by the need to maximise profit for shareholders and owners.

Social enterprises tackle a wide range of social and environmental issues and operate in all parts of the economy. By using business solutions to achieve public good, the Government believes that social enterprises have a distinct and valuable role to play in helping create a strong, sustainable and socially inclusive economy.

Social enterprises are diverse. They include local community enterprises, social firms, mutual organisations such as co-operatives, and large-scale organisations operating nationally or internationally. There is no single legal model for social enterprise. They include companies limited by shares; some organisations are unincorporated and others are registered charities.

Types of Social Enterprises

"Employee-owned businesses" range from the small, niche 'lifestyle' co-operatives, to medium-sized or large social enterprises that combine social goals with strong economic performance. The common feature of all successful employee-owned businesses is an "ownership culture".

"Community Businesses" are trading organisations set up, owned and controlled by the local community and which aim to be a focus for local development and ultimately create self-supporting jobs for local people. The term 'Community Business' is normally used for Social Enterprise that have a strong geographical definition and focus on local markets and services.

"Social Firms" are business created for the employment of people with a disability or other disadvantage in the labour market. It is business that uses its market-orientated production of goods and services to pursue its social mission. These firms are active in new sectors such as ICT and Tourism for disabled people to become economically independent. Paying wages at market rate is an important aspect of Social Firms where the aim is to have a minimum of 25% of people employed will be disabled.

www.scotland.gov.uk/library5/social/rose-00.asp for further information.

Part 10 90

Community Benefit Method Statement - Form

Community Benefit Method Statement - Form

I confirm that this Method Statement sets out the actions that will be undertaken to ensure the achievement of the Community Benefit requirements as set out in Clause [5.14 and 5.15] and in Part [10] of the Schedule to the Regeneration Agreement between the URC, the Developer and Forth HA. It is recognised that this document will be evaluated as part of the tender assessment and contract award procedure, and that delivery of the Community Benefit requirements is a contract condition.

Community Benefit Method Statement - Form

Please provide information in each of the following sections. This document must be submitted in relation to each individual Site.

1. Training

Describe the steps that will be taken to ensure that employed status new entrant trainees will comprise either a minimum of 10% of the person-weeks required to deliver the works or a minimum of 157 (no.) whichever is the greater, and that wherever possible such new entrant trainees will be recruited from Employment Connections, EmployAbility Stirling or another agency named by the URC. 91

1.2 Please complete the Tables below in relation to the whole development and then the next two 12-month periods.

Table 3 Total person-weeks to be delivered by new entrant trainees (excluding work placements)

Table 3 Total person-weeks to be delivered by new entrant trainees (excluding work placements)

Notes

P/wks - A person-week is the equivalent of one person working for 5 days either on site, or through a mix of on-site work and off-site training. The total person-weeks utilised on the contract to include time provided by management and professional staff, trades and operative staff, and ancillary staff.

No. - enter here the number of individuals that you anticipate using for each occupation and category .

A new entrant trainee is a person that is leaving an educational establishment ( e.g. school, college or university) or a training provider, or a non-employed person that is seeking employment that includes on-site training and assessment or offsite training, or a mix of these.

An apprentice is a person registered as an apprentice with an industry recognised body. Each apprentice can be counted as a 'new entrant' for up to 104 weeks.

Other Trainees - people that have a trainee contract or a contract of employment or self-employment that are not apprentices. Each 'other trainee' can be counted as a 'new entrant' for up to 52 weeks.

Total P/wks & No. - total the P/wks and total the numbers in each row for "B - apprentices" and "C - other trainees".

Table 4 Person-weeks to be delivered by new entrant trainees - next 2 x 12-month periods

Table 4 Person-weeks to be delivered by new entrant trainees - next 2 x 12-month periods

1.3 Describe the steps that will be taken to provide work experience for unwaged trainees for the whole development, and provide a breakdown of opportunities that will be made available where this is requested.

Table 5 -Total Un-waged Work-experience Opportunities

Table 5 -Total Un-waged Work-experience Opportunities

1.4 Describe how you will achieve any compliance from sub-contractors that will be necessary to meet the training and work experience requirements.

1.5 Describe how the requirement to create and maintain Training Plans (as defined in the Regeneration Agreement) will be achieved.

1.6 Describe any arrangements for ensuring that trainees progress with and complete their training programmes, including any arrangements for on-site assessment and training and liaison with training providers.

2. Targeted Recruitment

2.1 Describe the steps that will be taken to ensure that all vacancies, including those with sub-contractors, are notified to Employment Connections and EmployAbility Stirling or other named agencies.

2.2 Describe the steps that will be taken to ensure that suitable applicants from Employment Connections and EmployAbility Stirling are interviewed by the prospective employer.

2.3 Describe the steps that will be taken to ensure that information on the numbers of vacancies filled by candidates from Employment Connections and EmployAbility Stirling are recorded for monitoring and reporting purposes.

2.4 Please complete the Table below setting out the numbers of person-weeks of employment that could be made available to a person with a disability. Consultations with EmployAbility Stirling may be useful before completing this Table.

Table 6 Opportunities for people with a disability

Table 6 Opportunities for people with a disability

3. Equal Opportunities

3.1 Describe arrangements that will be in place to ensure the recording of complaints or incidents relating to discrimination or abuse on the basis of race, colour, gender, age, religion, or disability, including sub-contractor compliance.

3.2 Describe what disciplinary procedures will be operated in relation complaints of discrimination or abuse.

3.3 Identify who will be responsible for ensuring the achievement of the equal opportunities requirements in the contract, including sub-contractor compliance.

4. Social Enterprises

4.1 Describe any experience or evidence from other areas that has influenced your thinking on support for social enterprises.

4.2 Describe the support you will give to social enterprises, including any development support, business management and funding.

5. Small Businesses 92

5.1 Describe activities that you will undertake to identify Small Businesses ( SBs) 93 from Forthconstruction Forum or other organisations/lists agreed by Raploch URC and assess their capacity to deliver works, services or supplies that are required for the contract.

5.2 Describe any actions you will undertake or otherwise support to assist SBs from the Forthconstruction Forum or other agreed organisations/lists to obtain contracts in relation to the Development in the Raploch.

5.3 Describe any experience from other areas that has influenced your approach to the provision of opportunities for SBs.

6. Monitoring and Reporting

6.1 Describe the arrangements you will make for creating the site security record and for complying with the Data Protection Act in relation to the provision of monitoring information to the URC.

6.2 Describe the arrangements that will be made for recording the information needed to complete the schedule to be presented to each Monthly Site Meeting (as defined in the Community Benefit requirements within the Regeneration Agreement) including sub-contractor compliance.

6.3 Describe the administrative and management arrangements that will be operated in relation to the monitoring and reporting requirements.

7. Predicted Outcomes - Key Performance Indicators

Indicate below the anticipated outcome for each Community Benefit requirement, including outcomes to be delivered by sub-contractors.

Table 7 Predicted Outcomes - Key Performance Indicators

Requirement Unit of Measurement Predicted Outcome
Person-weeks delivered by new entrant trainees Person weeks
Number of new entrant trainees that will be recruited No. of people
Person-weeks delivered by people with a disability Person-weeks
Vacancies to be notified to the named agencies No. of vacancies
No. of vacancies to be filled by persons referred by the named agencies No. of people recruited
Total value of support to social enterprises £
Funding to be provided to support social enterprises £
Number of additional SBs that will be assessed as a potential supplier, split
between those via Forthconstruction* and others
No. of people recruited

*Refers to Forthconstruction Forum (ForthCons) or another organisation/list named by Raploch URC from time to time.

8. Management

8.1 Who will be responsible for ensuring that the Community Benefit requirements are met, including discussions with the client, the preparation of Method Statements, and the collection and presentation of monitoring information?

8.2 What administrative and Site staff will be involved in ensuring delivery of the Community Benefit requirements and providing monitoring information?

9. Costs

Complete the table below to show the net costs* that have been included in the tender sum in relation to the Community Benefits requirements.

Table 8 Costs

Type of expenditure Net Cost* £ Basis of calculation
Management
General administration
Supervision of training, targeted recruitment and equal opportunities
Training costs (excluding wages)
Trainee wages subsidies
Support for social enterprises
Support for SBs
Additional insurances
Other (please detail)
Total

* NET COST IS AFTER DEDUCTING FUNDS OBTAINED FROM OTHER SOURCES (E.G. CITB AND SCOTTISH ENTERPRISE, JOB CENTRE PLUS, ETC.), AND IN RELATION TO WAGES AFTER DEDUCTING THE VALUE OF WORK CARRIED OUT BY TRAINEES.


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Email: ceu@gov.scot