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Publication - Research Publication

Consultation on a review of the Scottish Social Housing Charter: an analysis of responses

Published: 15 Nov 2016
Part of:
Housing, Research
ISBN:
9781786525833

Analysis of responses to the 2016 consultation on a review of the Scottish Social Housing Charter.

76 page PDF

649.5kB

76 page PDF

649.5kB

Contents
Consultation on a review of the Scottish Social Housing Charter: an analysis of responses
12. Current Outcomes and Standards: Tenancy Sustainment (Charter outcome 11)

76 page PDF

649.5kB

12. Current Outcomes and Standards: Tenancy Sustainment (Charter outcome 11)

TENANCY SUSTAINMENT (Charter outcome 11)

Social landlords ensure that tenants get the information they need on how to obtain support to remain in their home, and ensure suitable support is available, including services provided directly by the landlord and by other organisations.

Supporting Narrative

This outcome covers how landlords can help tenants who may need support to maintain their tenancy. It includes tenants who may be at risk of falling into arrears with their rent, and tenants who may need their home adapted to cope with age, disability, or caring responsibilities.

Question 11a): Would you keep this outcome exactly as it is or change it? Please explain your answer.

12.1 Amongst the 91 respondents who answered this question, 66% considered that the outcome should remain as it is; 29% would change the outcome; and 5% did not know whether or not they would change it.

12.2 Most of the TRGs and local authorities were in favour of keeping the outcome as it is, in contrast with only a third of RSLs who wished the outcome to remain as it is (see Table 12.1 in Annex 2 for a breakdown of views by category of respondent).

Views of those in favour of keeping the outcome as it is

12.3 Views amongst those favouring the status quo were that the outcome made sense, was relevant, clear and concise and easy to understand. One individual respondent suggested that examples could be added to enhance understanding.

Views of those in favour of changing the outcome

12.4 The issue most frequently raised, particularly amongst RSLs, was that RSLs operate in a wider policy context and are not able to "ensure" suitable support is available as this may be out of their control. They commented that they could do whatever is within their powers to seek the support of other organisations, but ultimately, changes in relevant policy such as benefit cut-backs or different organisational priorities, curtailed their own scope of control. Suggestions were made for changing wording to reflect this, for example, stating that social landlords will signpost to other suitable support.

12.5 Further specific comments are provided in Annex 3.

Question 11b): Please provide any suggestions on how we could improve the supporting narrative

12.6 Requests were made for additions to the text and these are listed in Annex 3.

12.7 Very few other substantive comments were made. One TRG remarked that factors such as costs and ageing stock could hamper achievement of adaptations to homes. A local authority called for reference to the importance of partnership working within and outwith the housing sector. One RSL commented that in addition to ensuring landlords provide support, tenants need to engage with the support on offer. One public body recommended that support services should be fully accessible to those who require them.


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