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Publication - Consultation Responses

The future of energy in Scotland: consultation analysis

Published: 14 Nov 2017
Part of:
Energy, Environment and climate change, Research
ISBN:
9781788514187

An independent analysis of the responses to the consultation on a Scottish Energy Strategy: The Future of Energy in Scotland.

130 page PDF

845.5kB

130 page PDF

845.5kB

Contents
The future of energy in Scotland: consultation analysis
5. Delivery, Monitoring and Engagement

130 page PDF

845.5kB

5. Delivery, Monitoring and Engagement

5.1. Chapter 6 of the draft Energy Strategy noted the importance of deep collaboration between the public and private sectors and the part this will play in reaching the 2050 vision.

The benefits of working in partnership

Q15: What ideas do you have about how Scottish Government, the private sector and the public sector can maximise the benefits of working in partnership to deliver the 2050 vision for energy in Scotland?

Summary of main themes:

  • There was support from some respondents for the Scottish Government and the private and public sectors to work in partnership, although a wide range of stakeholder organisations were suggested for inclusion in partnership working, so as to maximise use of expertise.
  • There were also some suggestions that co-operative models of delivery, shared ownership and involvement of local communities in the design and development of projects would be important.

5.2. Comments on this question came from 129 respondents across all respondent groups.

5.3. Many of these respondents (37) voiced their support for the Scottish Government and the private and public sectors working in partnership to deliver the 2050 vision for energy in Scotland. Key reasons for this support included that partnership working will be the only way to meet the challenging targets of the Strategy, that sectors need to work together to maximise opportunities, or that it will help to deliver confidence in the future of the market.

5.4. Respondents referred to a wide range of different stakeholder organisations, with a full spread of expertise, which should be involved in partnership working and these included:

  • Consumer groups.
  • Colleges and universities.
  • Local enterprise agencies.
  • The private rented sector.
  • Housing associations and commercial landlords.
  • Local authorities.
  • Trade unions and representative bodies.
  • Professional organisations.
  • Chambers of Commerce.
  • Enterprise and skills agencies.
  • The NHS.
  • Community organisations.
  • Consumer groups.
  • The general public.
  • Industry.

5.5. Several respondents provided examples of ways in which the Scottish Government could collaborate with the private and public sector to deliver solutions to market.

5.6. A need to develop Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics ( STEM) training: Several respondents commented on the need for the development of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics ( STEM) training so that there will be a skilled workforce.

5.7. A need for strategic partnerships: A small number of respondents suggested a need for strategic partnerships between the Scottish Government and industry or for the use of co-operative models of delivery and shared ownership between developers, communities and the government. It was noted by a small number of respondents that if local communities are fully involved in the design and development of projects that it will help with investment returns and reinforce local economic development.

5.8. A small number of respondents noted that public sector investment alone will not be sufficient to deliver the vision for energy in Scotland as set out in the Strategy.

5.9. A need for co-operation: A small number of respondents within the Community and Third Sector / NGO sub-groups commented that public bodies need to co-operate on major energy infrastructure opportunities as a condition of any funding. These respondents also felt it is important to get the public bodies co-operating on major energy infrastructure opportunities like heat networks as a condition of allocating funding to them; and requested that the Scottish Government reinstates the Sullivan Report timetable for low and zero carbon technologies as this would provide a clear timetable and targets.

Monitoring delivery

Q16: What ideas do you have about how delivery of the Energy Strategy should be monitored?

Summary of main themes:

  • Respondents welcomed the commitment to publish an Annual Strategy Energy Statement although it was felt this would need to be accessible, provide an appropriate level of detail, encompass a whole energy system and be flexible.
  • There were also requests for parliamentary scrutiny of the annual report.
  • Respondents were supportive of robust monitoring and an evaluation framework, with interim targets and milestones against which to measure progress.
  • All stakeholders should be involved in setting targets, and targets should be SMART, consistent across sectors and allow for co-ordinated implementation.

5.10. Comments on this question came from 115 respondents across all respondent groups.

5.11. The key comment made by many respondents was that they welcomed the commitment in the Strategy to publish an Annual Energy Statement which will take account of the Climate Change Plan ( CCP) monitoring framework and relevant energy indicators, although there were a small number of qualifying statements. These referred to the need for the document to:

  • Be accessible to all.
  • Provide an appropriate level of detail and information that will allow for external scrutiny and inform any debate.
  • Have a framework that encompasses a whole energy system.
  • Be balanced between energy demand and supply actions.
  • Be flexible so as to respond to developments in technology, with the potential for new indicators to be included as new technologies emerge.

5.12. Monitoring and evaluation: Many respondents across all sub-groups commented on the need for robust monitoring and an evaluation framework, with interim targets and milestones against which progress can be measured. There were some suggestions that an interim review should be undertaken every five years as this will allow flexibility to include any future developments in emerging technologies to be taken into consideration. It was also felt that this would enable stakeholders to have confidence in the process and offer robust scrutiny of the strategy and its implementation.

5.13. A small number of respondents within the Academia / Research / Training sub-group felt that evidence reviews and policy reviews and assessments will be important in supporting delivery of the Strategy.

5.14. Setting targets: Several respondents, primarily within the Third Sector / NGO and Renewable Energy sub-groups, requested that any targets set are SMART (specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, timebound) targets, with some suggestions that all stakeholders should be involved in setting targets for electricity, heat and transport. One respondent in the Third Sector / NGO group noted that the involvement of stakeholders will mean that targets set will be consistent across sectors and allow for co-ordinated implementation; another that this will mean the process of target setting is inclusive and allow for joint ownership across all relevant sectors.

5.15. Monitoring via the Annual Climate Change Declaration Report: A small number of respondents within the Local Government sub-group suggested that targets could be monitored through the Annual Climate Change Declaration Report.

5.16. Some respondents suggested specific targets that could be introduced, with some referring to the need for measures to include a range of different areas including demand side, building stock, transport, industry demand, energy generation and land use.

5.17. Potential additional measures: More specific measures to monitor delivery and mentioned by more than one respondent included:

  • Monitor energy used.
  • Source of energy provision.
  • Cost of producing energy.
  • Fuel poverty.
  • Social benefits, including health and jobs created.
  • CO 2 reductions across sectors.
  • Environmental impacts.

5.18. A need to set robust high level objectives: A small number of respondents in the Third Sector / NGO sub-group commented on the need to set robust high level objectives but not to 'to micro-manage every step of the way'. The same organisations also noted the need "to encourage innovation in developing open-hearted delivery vehicles which bring especially the public bodies together and in due course private and commercial interests for mutual benefit."

5.19. A need for parliamentary scrutiny: There were suggestions from several respondents that the annual report should be brought before the Scottish Parliament for scrutiny, with oral statements from Ministers.

5.20. While not an explicit commitment in the draft Energy Strategy, respondents would like the Scottish TIMES whole energy model made available. However, there were requests for greater clarity to be provided in this Strategy and the final CCP on the assumptions and constraints applied to (and outwith) TIMES as well as on the outputs of TIMES across different sectors. The perceived benefit of this is that it would enable constructive scrutiny of overall targets and help to monitor progress across technologies.

5.21. A small number of respondents noted a need for a publicly accountable and expert independent agency to monitor delivery of the energy strategy. There were a small number of references that this role would sit with the Scottish Energy Advisory Board ( SEAB) or a similar type of organisation, with one respondent in the Energy sub-group suggesting this should be a committee similar to that set up for Climate Change.

Approach to deepening public engagement

Q17: What are your views on the proposed approach to deepening public engagement set out in Chapter 6?

Summary of main themes:

  • Respondents welcomed the commitment to greater public engagement, with only a small number disagreeing with the suggested approach.
  • There were suggestions of a need to include a wide range of groups in helping to deepen public engagement; this included local community organisations.
  • Respondents focused on a need to ensure a consistent, well developed, co-ordinated and long term national awareness campaign, using a range of different media channels.

5.22. Comments on this question came from 134 respondents across all respondent groups.

5.23. Many of these respondents welcomed the commitment to greater public engagement and the approaches that were suggested in the draft Energy Strategy, with some simply reiterating the importance of public engagement. Only two Individuals disagreed with the approach being suggested.

5.24. A need to include a wide range of different stakeholder groups: There were several comments on the need to include a wide range of different groups in helping to deepen public engagement and to work in collaboration and co-operation with each other. These groups included community organisations, the public sector, the private sector, NGOs, landowners and academia.

5.25. Information dissemination: Many of the respondents commenting at this question made suggestions for communication channels that could be used to contact and engage with the public. Many focused on the need for a consistent, well developed, co-ordinated and long term national awareness campaign, using a range of different media channels. While there was some support for using digital channels some respondents, particularly those in the Third Sector/ NGO sub-group, noted the need to communicate information via a range of channels so as to ensure the inclusion of all.

5.26. Several respondents noted the need for dissemination at a local level, via local community organisations such as Community Planning Partnerships ( CPPs), community councils and other community groups. There was also reference by some of these organisations for resources to be provided to local groups in order to help with public engagement. These comments came primarily from respondents within Third Sector / NGO and Local Government sub-groups. There were also a small number of references to the involvement of businesses, the workforce and / or trade unions or representative bodies, schools and curricula and representative groups such as Chambers of Commerce or the Federation of Small Businesses.

5.27. Involve Local Energy Scotland: Several respondents referred to involving Local Energy Scotland as it works with local communities and as such already has strong links.

5.28. Alternative routes to involve the general public: In order to encourage the general public to become more involved, there were a small number of suggestions to actively promote the financial opportunities that may be available via shared ownership or to share data and information. A small number of respondents in the Energy - Other sub-group suggested use of collective switching schemes for residents in local authorities.

5.29. There was also some reference of the need to link public engagement with the Community Empowerment Act and Local Outcomes Improvement Plans ( LOIPs).

5.30. The use of toolkits: Several respondents, mostly within the Third Sector / NGO or Local Government groups referred to the use of toolkits, with the ISM (Individual-Social-Material) Behaviour Change Model referred to most frequently.

5.31. A need for local energy champions. There were also a small number of suggestions for local energy champions or community energy officers who could offer impartial advice to the general public.

5.32. Other comments made by very small numbers of respondents at this question included:

  • The need to ensure that the public is listened to and their comments are acted upon ie that the Scottish Government is not just seen to 'talk the talk'.
  • Concerns that it will be difficult to reach all of the general public as some have little or no interest in the topic of energy.
  • Link this Strategy to other policy areas such as Clear Air for Scotland ( CAFS) or planning.
  • There is a need for further consultation to consider the engagement process that will be adopted.
  • A need for honesty in media debates.

5.33. Several respondents indicated their desire to work with the Scottish Government on any further work in engaging with the public.

5.34. Additional recurring sub themes

  • The need to bring about a cultural change in attitudes and behaviour.
  • The need to provide transparent illustrations of the true costs of all energy types, including indirect costs, or to provide practical examples of the ways in which energy bills and carbon usage can be cut (Energy sub-groups).
  • The need to publicise successful projects (Energy or Local Government sub-groups).
  • The need for further detail and information.

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