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Publication - Report

Consultation on United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD): analysis of responses - summary

Published: 18 Nov 2016
Part of:
Communities and third sector, Equality and rights
ISBN:
9781786525659

Presents a summary of the analysis from the consultation on our Draft Delivery Plan for 2016 to 2020 on the UNCRPD.

21 page PDF

231.0kB

21 page PDF

231.0kB

Contents
Consultation on United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD): analysis of responses - summary
Outcome 1 - Equal and inclusive access to the physical and cultural environment, transport and suitable, affordable housing

21 page PDF

231.0kB

Outcome 1 - Equal and inclusive access to the physical and cultural environment, transport and suitable, affordable housing

Sixteen commitments were included under Outcome 1. Consultees were asked if they felt that these commitments would help the Scottish Government make progress towards Outcome 1. Over three quarters (77%) agreed that they would.

Commitments under Outcome 1 included transport; housing; tourism; culture; sport; and an awareness raising campaign highlighting the barriers that disabled people face. Commitment 1 (transport accessibility) and commitment 16 (One Scotland awareness raising campaign) received the most comments.

Links were made between the different commitments and accessing other rights. Transport was recognised as important for accessing other services, and adequate housing was seen as a prerequisite for accessing other rights.

A lot of the comments received under Outcome 1 indicated that consultees were generally supportive of these commitments. Recurring themes mentioned included engagement, inclusive communication, and comments about the practicalities of implementing the commitments.

Access issues were mentioned in relation to transport, housing, sport and culture and tourism. Attitudinal barriers, among service providers and members of the public, were emphasised, in addition to physical barriers. In relation to accessible design it was stated that access was about more than wheelchair access and that it should also cater for other unseen disabilities.

The need for training around disability and equality was mentioned for a range of service providers, such as those who plan and design buildings, bus drivers, taxi drivers, and people working in sport, culture and tourism.

The limited nature of commitments was noted. In relation to an award for accessible design (commitment 3), for example, it was commented that an award alone would not be sufficient to improve accessibility, whilst funding for a para-sport facility in Inverclyde as part of improving disability inclusion in sport (commitment 13) was criticised for not benefiting disabled people from outwith the central belt.

Suggestions were also offered around various commitments, such as what guides might include (commitments 7 and 8); what the One Scotland awareness raising campaign could include (commitment 16); and how virtual access to historic sites could be explored (commitment 12).


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