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Publication - Report

Draft climate change plan: draft third report on policies and proposals 2017-2032

Published: 19 Jan 2017
Part of:
Environment and climate change
ISBN:
9781786527431

Draft of the climate change plan, the third report on proposals and policies (RPP3) for meeting Scotland’s annual greenhouse gas emissions targets.

175 page PDF

1.9MB

175 page PDF

1.9MB

Contents
Draft climate change plan: draft third report on policies and proposals 2017-2032
13. Land Use (LULUCF)

175 page PDF

1.9MB

13. Land Use (LULUCF)

The Land Use, Land Use Change and Forestry ( LULUCF) sector is divided into six land use types for reporting carbon emissions and carbon removals from the atmosphere: Forest Land; Cropland; Grassland; Wetlands (Peatland); Settlements; and Other Land. Net carbon stocks from Harvested Wood Products ( HWP) are reported under an additional category.

LULUCF is a sector which has the possibility of removing greenhouse gases from the atmosphere.

13.1 Where we are now

13.1.1 This chapter discusses historical emissions and removals arising from the LULUCF sector, and sets out the Scottish Government's ambitions specifically on forestry and peatland up to 2032.

Figure 21: LULUCF historical emissions

Figure 21: LULUCF historical emissions

13.1.2 The above figure shows that in 1990, the LULUCF sector as a whole was sequestrating or absorbing a net 2.3 MtCO 2e. This represents negative emissions of 2.3 MtCO 2e. Since then, there has been a significant increase in net sequestration up to 6.2 MtCO 2e in 2014. Once again this can be represented as negative emissions of 6.2 MtCO 2e.

13.1.3 The increase in net sequestration has been driven by a fall in emissions from the conversion of grassland to cropland, an increase in carbon sequestered from grassland and the significant increase in sequestration from forestry. For forestry this is an increase in sequestration from 8.8 MtCO 2e in 1990 to 10.2 MtCO 2e in 2014.

13.2 Our ambition

13.2.1 Net sequestration in the LULUCF sector is expected to decrease in the coming years. LULUCF will switch from being a net sink to being a net source, although the forestry component will remain a sink. Beyond 2032 the LULUCF sector will return to being a net sink as recent woodland creation and replanted forests mature and restored peatland sequester more carbon.

Figure 22: LULUCF Carbon envelopes

Figure 22: LULUCF Carbon envelopes

13.2.2 The overall decrease in sequestration is driven by a lower volume of emissions sequestered by forestry. This is as a result of the decreasing rate of woodland creation over the last 40 years, and that conifer plantations established in the in the mid-20th century are reaching maturity and being felled and replanted. This decrease has not yet been compensated for by the future increase in sequestration from the recent increase in woodland creation rates, replanting of forests that have been felled, peatland restoration activity, and the fall in emissions generated by agriculture-related land use activity and development (which is not included in the agricultural sector).

13.2.3 The next two subsections set out the forestry and peatland elements of LULUCF in more detail.

13.3 Forestry

The sector covers the expansion of Scotland's forest and woodlands and the increased use of wood products as a natural renewable resource.

Where we are now - Forestry

13.3.1 Woodland creation integrated with other land uses supports fulfilment of Scottish Government's commitments on climate change and biodiversity and the sustainable supply of wood products to the Scottish forestry industry. The forestry sector is worth almost £1 billion per year and employs over 25,000 people in Scotland.

13.3.2 Forests and woodlands cover around 18% of land in Scotland, with the area split between 74% coniferous and 26% broadleaf tree species. Most of these woodlands are independently certified to internationally recognised standards of good forestry practice. The Scottish Government endorses the UK Forestry Standard, a benchmark for sustainable forest management and all woodlands created using Scottish Government funding must meet the requirements of this Standard. In 2015, 83% of all harvested wood products in the UK came from independently certified sources.

13.3.3 Sustainable wood production is currently increasing in Scotland as woodlands planted in the 1960s and 1970s mature. The harvesting and marketing of wood products is becoming an increasingly important economic activity in rural Scotland and over 8.4 million cubic metres of wood products were produced in 2015.

13.3.4 Scotland's forest carbon sink increased between 1990 to 1999 but has remained relatively constant since then, with a slight reduction in sequestration in recent years which is predicted to continue. This is due to the rate of afforestation decreasing over the last 40 years and conifer plantations established in the mid-20th century reaching maturity and being felled and replanted. In 2014, the last time it was measured, forestry was the only sector in which there was a net emissions sink (-10.2 MtCO 2e).

Our ambition - Forestry

13.3.5 By 2032, Scotland's woodland cover will increase from around18% to 21% of the Scottish land area. These new woodlands will absorb greenhouse gas emissions and provide confidence for the forest products industry to continue to invest in Scotland and create new jobs. The woodlands will also help mitigate flood risk and improve water quality, as well as making an important contribution to improving biodiversity and people's health and wellbeing. These new woods will be created in accordance with the requirements of sustainable forest management and be integrated with other rural and urban land uses to support the delivery of the Land Use Strategy (2016-2021) objectives, which are:

  • Land-based businesses working with nature to contribute more to Scotland's prosperity.
  • Responsible stewardship of Scotland's natural resources delivering more benefits to Scotland's people.
  • Urban and rural communities better connected to the land, with more people enjoying the land and positively influencing land use.

13.3.6 Furthermore, as this sustainable woodland resource increases and produces more wood fibre, a greater amount of wood products will be used in construction, consequently storing more sequestered carbon in buildings leading to more jobs and investment in the wood product industry.

13.3.7 The focus for delivering our ambition is to:

  • increase our long term annual woodland creation target from the current target of 10,000 hectares per year to:
  • 12,000 hectares per year from 2020/21
  • 14,000 hectares per year from 2022/23
  • 15,000 hectares per year from 2024/25
  • increase the use of Scottish wood products in construction from the current level of 2.2 million cubic metres to:
  • 2.6 million cubic metres by 2021/22
  • 2.8 million cubic metres by 2026/27
  • 3.0 million cubic metres by 2031/32

13.3.8 Our longer-term ambition is:

By 2050 Scotland's woodland will be delivering a greater level of key ecosystem services, such as contributing to natural flood management and improving biodiversity. Scotland's forests will also be making a greater contribution towards the country's natural capital stocks, and this renewable natural resource will be sustainably managed to ensure that future generations can realise these benefits.

Forestry policy outcomes, policies, development milestones and proposals

Policy outcome 1: To enhance the contribution that trees make to reducing emissions through sequestering carbon, we will introduce a stepped increase in the annual woodland creation rates from 2020/21.

There are six policies and four proposals that contribute to the delivery of the policy outcome 1.

Policies which contribute to the delivery of policy outcome 1

1) Forestry grants: We will provide funding each year, via the Forestry Grant Scheme, to support eligible land owners to establish appropriate woodlands.

2) Woodland creation: Through a targeted woodland creation programme Forest Enterprise Scotland will create new woodland on the National Forest Estate.

3) Awareness raising: Through working in partnership with representatives from land management organisations, we will design and deliver annual awareness raising programmes which promote the benefits of woodland creation for land managers and encourage more woodland creation.

4) Woodland standards: Through revising the UK Forestry Standard to bring it up-to-date, the Scottish Government will ensure that all new woodlands supported under the Forestry Grant Scheme are designed and established to meet recognised standards of sustainable forestry.

5) Woodland Carbon Code: Through an annual programme of joint promotion with private sector forestry businesses, the Scottish Government will encourage an increased level of investment in woodlands that are accredited under the Woodland Carbon Code.

6) Forestry and woodland strategies: The Scottish Government will support planning authorities in the development and revision of local forestry and woodland strategies, which will indicate preferred and potential areas appropriate for woodland creation.

Proposals which contribute to the delivery of policy outcome 1

1) Forestry Grant Scheme: Deliver improvements to the Forestry Grant Scheme application process (2017).

2) Woodland creation schemes: Identify additional investment opportunities for woodland creation schemes (2017/18).

3) Targeted grants: Develop further targeted grants measures (2018/19).

4) National Forest Estate: Review Forest Enterprise Scotland's woodland creation activity on the National Forest Estate (2019/20).

Policy outcome 2: Increase the use of sustainably sourced wood fibre in downstream industries, such as construction, to reduce emissions by substituting higher embodied carbon construction materials with wood products.

There is one policy that contributes to the delivery of policy outcome 2.

Policy which contributes to the delivery of policy outcome 2

1) The Scottish Government will implement the Timber Development Programme through an annual programme of projects, in collaboration with the private forest sector and other public sector bodies that support the promotion and development of wood products for use in construction.

Wider impacts of emissions reduction in the Forestry sector

Co-benefits to be realised

13.3.9 There are substantial economic benefits from forestry. Sustainably managed forestry contributes almost £1 billion to Scotland's economy and supports over 25,000 jobs. It helps mitigate flood risk and improves water quality and it has beneficial effects on soil. It contributes to improving biodiversity and to people's health and wellbeing through the provision of accessible woodland. Forestry can have a positive effect when new woodlands are designed and delivered to meet the UK Forestry Standard.

13.3.10 Our woodland creation ambition will directly benefit all those that work in forestry (management, wood product supply and recreational activities) and the farmers, crofters and land managers who create woodland on land they manage, as well as having the potential to improve the stewardship of the land where it has been poorly managed in the past. People across Scotland will also benefit from access to new woods for recreation.

13.3.11 The majority of forests producing wood products in Scotland are independently certified against internationally recognised principles and criteria for sustainable forest management. A shift in using building materials obtained from renewable sources has the potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. A further benefit is that the revenue from these wood products can be re-invested in sustainable forest management, ensuring a continued cycle of benefits.

13.3.12 Additional benefits may also be derived from reducing the volume of waste materials generated by the construction sector. Construction materials are one of the most significant waste material flows, by weight, in Scotland. The waste from construction using wood products is lower and can readily be recycled. Reducing the amount currently being disposed of in landfill will therefore have further benefits through reducing the negative impacts associated with this waste disposal method.

13.3.13 Forestry provides significant rural employment and an increase in economic forestry activity to produce more wood products for construction will increase economic activity in rural Scotland.

Adverse side effects to be managed

13.3.14 The effects of land use change on the wider environment and communities could be mixed, depending on the scale and nature of changes. For example woodland creation can have significant positive or negative impacts on the landscape, biodiversity and patterns of recreational use. Potential negative impacts can be mitigated if woodland creation schemes are appropriately designed and delivered to meet the requirements of the UK Forestry Standard through adopting good practice. Local woodland and forestry strategies also identify the appropriate location for woodlands to maximise the delivery of public benefits and minimise adverse environmental and landscape impacts. In addition, specific woodland creation proposals must meet the requirements of the statutory processes for assessing impact on designated habitats or the wider environment.

13.3.15 Adherence to the UK Forestry Standard and associated guidelines will ensure the forests managed to produce wood products do not have a negative impacts on soil stability, water quality and biodiversity.

13.3.16 Increased harvesting of wood products will increase the use of the rural road network by heavy vehicles. However, the Scottish Government is working to reduce these impacts to a minimum where possible, through working with the forestry sector and local authorities, and providing support under the Scottish Government Strategic Timber Transport Scheme.

Summary of policies, development milestones and proposals

Policy outcome 1: To enhance the contribution that trees make to reducing emissions, through sequestering carbon, we will introduce a stepped increase in the annual woodland creation rates from 2020/21.

Table 13-1: Policies that contribute to policy outcome 1

Policy

EU, UK or Scottish policy

Public sector partners

Delivery route

Forestry grants: We will provide funding each year, via the Forestry Grant Scheme, to support eligible land owners establishing appropriate woodlands

Scottish

Scottish Government, SEPA, SNH

Continue to operate a grant scheme such as the Forestry Grant Scheme to provide support for woodland creation projects that meet the requirements of the UK Forestry Standard. Make support available for different types of woodland to deliver multiple benefits including greenhouse gas mitigation, production of sustainable wood products, biodiversity and health and wellbeing outcomes.

Woodland creation: Through a targeted woodland creation programme Forest Enterprise Scotland will create new woodland on the National Forest Estate

Scottish

Forestry Commission Scotland, Scottish Government. SEPA, SNH

Forest Enterprise Scotland to deliver an annual contribution towards the overall woodland creation target by creating new sustainable woodland on the National Forest Estate.

Awareness raising: Through working in partnership with representatives from a range of land management organisations, we will design and deliver annual awareness raising programmes which promote the benefits of woodland creation for land managers and encourage more woodland creation

Scottish

Scottish Government

Continue to deliver a programme of farm-based events to demonstrate and support improved productivity through integration of farming and forestry enterprises. An example of this is the Sheep and Trees project, a partnership between the Scottish Government, forestry and the sheep farming sector.

Woodland Standards: Through revising the UK Forestry Standard to bring it up-to-date, the Scottish Government will ensure that all new woodlands supported under the Forestry Grant Scheme are designed and established to meet recognised standards of sustainable forestry

UK

Forestry Commission Scotland, Natural Resources Wales, Forestry Commission England

The Scottish Government is working with the UK and country governments to publish a refreshed UK Forestry Standard that articulates the consistent UK-wide approach to sustainable forestry. The Standard defines how woodland should be created and managed to meet sustainable forest management principles and provides a basis for monitoring.

Woodland Carbon Code: Through an annual programme of joint promotion with the private forestry sector, the Scottish Government will encourage an increased level of investment in woodlands that are accredited under the Woodland Carbon Code

UK

Forestry Commission Scotland, Natural Resources Wales, Forestry Commission England

Increased promotion of the Woodland Carbon Code by Forestry Commission Scotland, in partnership with the forestry sector, to raise the profile of the Code as a potential vehicle for attracting additional investment into woodland creation projects.

Forestry and Woodland Strategies: The Scottish Government will support planning authorities in the development and revision of local Forestry and Woodland Strategies, which will indicate preferred/potential areas for appropriate woodland creation

Scottish

Planning authorities

Forestry and woodland strategies continue to be prepared by planning authorities, with support from Forestry Commission Scotland. They provide a framework for forestry expansion through identifying preferred areas where forestry can have a positive impact on the environment, landscape, economy and local people.

Table 13-2: Proposals which contribute to policy outcome 1

Proposal

Delivery route

Forestry Grant Scheme: Deliver improvements to the Forestry Grant Scheme application process (2017)

An independent review by Jim Mackinnon was carried out to recommend actions to speed up and streamline approval processes for sustainable planting schemes. The review report was published in December 2016. The Scottish Government has accepted the recommendations of the review in principle, and will publish and implement a delivery plan to implement the recommendations.

Woodland Creation Schemes: Identify additional investment opportunities for woodland creation schemes (2017/18)

Work with partners (private sector, community organisations) to investigate the scope of different investment models with the potential to increase private sector investment in forestry projects.

Targeted Grants: Develop further targeted grant measures (2018/19)

We will continually review the potential for further targeted Forestry Grant Scheme support to encourage specific types of woodland creation and/or woodland creation in specific areas.

National Forest Estate: Review Forest Enterprise Scotland's woodland creation activity on the National Forest Estate (2019/20)

Undertake a review of the woodland creation activity on the National Forest Estate.

Table 13-3: Policy outcome 1 over time

Policy outcome 1

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

2027

2028

2029

2030

2031

2032

No. of hectares of woodland created as a result of delivering the associated policies

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

No. of hectares of woodland created as a consequence of proposals listed above (once policies)

0

0

0

0

2,000

2,000

4,000

4,000

5,000

5,000

5,000

5,000

5,000

5,000

5,000

5,000

Total change in policy outcome as a result of policies and proposals

10,000 ha

10,000 ha

10,000 ha

10,000 ha

12,000 ha

12,000 ha

14,000 ha

14,000 ha

15,000 ha

15,000 ha

15,000 ha

15,000 ha

15,000 ha

15,000 ha

15,000 ha

15,000 ha

Policy outcome 2: Increase the use of sustainably sourced wood fibre in downstream industries, such as construction, to reduce emissions by substituting higher embodied carbon construction materials with wood products.

Table 13-4: Policies that contribute to policy outcome 2

Policy

EU, UK or Scottish policy

Public sector partners

Delivery route

The Scottish Government will implement the Timber Development Programme through an annual programme of projects, in collaboration with the private forest sector and other public sector bodies, that supports the promotion and development of wood products for use in construction

Scottish

Scottish Enterprise, Highlands and Islands Enterprise, Construction Scotland Innovation Centre, Architecture and Design Scotland and Zero Waste Scotland

Activities from this policy are delivered through collaborations and partnerships with private and public sector bodies. The main aim is to increase use of wood products in construction. The outputs of the Programme are closely aligned to the objectives of "Roots for Future Growth" the Forest and Timber Technologies industry leadership group strategy, and Scotland's Economic Strategy. The Programme is developed and ratified through engagement with industry representatives on an annual basis and implementation is focused on increasing market demand across the UK.

Table 13-5: Policy outcome 2 over time

Policy outcome 2

2017 Ref. year 2014

2018

2019

2020

2021

2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

2027

2028

2029

2030

2031

2032

Annual volume of Scottish produced sawnwood and panel boards used in construction (Extrapolated from UK figures) (million cubic metres)

2.2

2.6

2.8

3.0

Increase in wood fibre products being used in construction. (million cubic metres)

0

0.4

Progress since RPP2 - Forestry

Table 13-6: Progress on RPP2 policies

RPP2 Policies

Summary of progress

Create 100,000 hectare of woodland between 2012-2022 (equivalent to 10,000 hectares per year)

During the period of RPP2 the Scottish Government has supported the creation of 27,500 hectares of new woodland, accounting for over 70% of all the woodland created in the UK. The average annual rate has been 6,800 hectares per year. This is a lower annual contribution than the 10,000 hectare per year required to deliver the overall policy ambition of creating 100,000 hectares between 2012-2022. In response, the Scottish Government has initiated a number of inter-related initiatives to stimulate an increase in woodland creation including: delivering a new Forestry Grant Scheme ( FGS); commissioning an independent review to streamline the grant application process; and working with farming stakeholders to establish more woodland on appropriate land on farms. These initiatives have led to an increase in woodland creation activity indicating that the existing annual target will be achieved in the near future.

Table 13-7: Progress on RPP2 proposals

RPP2 Proposals

Summary of progress

Increase use of wood products in construction

This proposal started in 2013 with RPP2. Since then the Scottish Government has worked to identify if there are any regulatory barriers to the use of wood engineered products in construction in Scotland. No regulatory barriers were identified, but guidance for planners and architects was suggested, as well as promoting the benefits of wood products in construction to developers. In response to these suggestions, Scottish Government has supported the supply chain through Scottish Enterprise and the private sector, commissioned research to investigate the viability of Scottish wood products as a structural material, and explored the development of a UK market focused on the use of Scottish wood products in order to encourage private investment.

13.4 Peat

The restoration of degraded peatlands to remove a source of greenhouse gas emissions and to create a source of carbon sequestration.

Where we are now - Peat

13.4.1 Peatlands cover around 20% of land in Scotland or around 1.7 million hectares. Well maintained peatlands are an important source of carbon storage, or sink. However, it is currently estimated that over 600,000 hectares of Scotland's peatlands are in a degraded condition as a result of historic land management decisions. This degraded state means that a substantial proportion of Scotland's peatlands are acting as a source of greenhouse gas emissions, rather than a sink.

13.4.2 Since 2013, through the Peatland Action Initiative, around 10,000 hectares of peatlands have been restored through Scottish Government led action, working with public and private land managers across Scotland. The most recently available estimates suggest that degraded peatland (excluding peatlands used for forestry or agriculture) produces 4 megatonnes of CO 2e emissions per year. These emissions are yet to be accounted for in the national GHG inventory.

Our ambition - Peat

13.4.3 By 2030, 40% of degraded peatland will be restored to good condition. This policy action will have considerable impact by converting peatlands from emitting carbon to acting as a carbon sink as well as reducing emissions from degraded bogs. The restored peatland will also help mitigate flood risk and improve water quality, as well as helping to increase biodiversity in restored areas.

13.4.4 As well as providing increased carbon storage, this large-scale peatland restoration delivery across Scotland will also produce multiple benefits for communities and the economy. The key sectors expected to see benefits are tourism, food and drink and the environment.

13.4.5 To make progress towards this ambition, we will focus on achieving a significant increase in the scale of degraded peatland restored, from a 1990 baseline to:

  • 50,000 hectares restored by 2020
  • 250,000 hectares restored by 2030

13.4.6 Our longer term ambition is that by 2050, Scotland's expanded peatlands will be thriving habitats, sustaining a diverse ecosystem and sequestering more carbon than ever before.

Peat policy outcomes, policies, development milestones and proposals

Policy outcome 1: To enhance the contribution of peatland to carbon storage, we will support an increase in the annual rate of peatland restoration, from 10,000 hectares in 2017/18 to 20,000 hectares per year thereafter.

There are two policies which will contribute to the delivery of policy outcome 1.

Policies which contribute to the delivery of policy outcome 1

1) Restoration grants: We will provide grant funding to support eligible land managers to deliver peatland restoration. Levels of funding will enable at least 20,000 hectares of peatland restoration per year from 2018/19.

2) Awareness raising: Working through partnership, we will put in place tools and information to develop the capacity, skills and knowledge of land managers, contractors and others, to deliver peatland restoration.

Relative significance of policies to the delivery of policy outcome 1

13.4.7 These two policies are mutually interlinked. Growing the capacity and skills of land managers and others will be essential to delivering practical restoration across Scotland. In addition, the increased involvement and interest of land managers in peatland restoration can also help draw in other forms of funding, including private initiatives such as the Peatland Code.

13.4.8 Full details of policies, policy development milestones and proposals are set out in the tables below. The delivery of these will be tracked through the monitoring framework (see section 6).

Wider impacts of emissions reduction in the Peat sector

Co-benefits to be realised

13.4.9 Peatland restoration will provide a number of co-benefits, including supporting increased biodiversity which, in turn, will help to maintain and improve the status of protected sites. Tick populations have been shown to reduce following restoration, benefitting both human and animal health.

13.4.10 Restoration will also contribute to the water environment through reducing sources of diffuse pollution. This will help improve the ecological status of water bodies and also help reduce the costs of treatment costs of public water supplies. For households and businesses using private water supplies, restoration may also help reduce the water discolouration. Restoration of peatlands can also be an important component of natural flood management, by reducing and displacing flood peaks.

13.4.11 Additional economic benefits may also accrue given the importance of peatlands to Scotland's environmental image, critical to key sectors such as food and drink and tourism. Reduced sources of diffuse pollution will also provide benefits to sectors such as fresh water fisheries.

13.4.12 Communities near peatlands also play a valuable role in their restoration and may also benefit from the improved access to peatlands. In many parts of the Central Belt, bogs provide open space and places for people to walk away from traffic.

13.4.13 Individual businesses and environmental non-governmental organisations ( eNGOs) that manage peatlands will also benefit from their restoration. Undertaking restoration action at the large, landscape scale aimed for by this policy outcome should help deliver greater co-benefits than smaller scale and more fragmented restoration projects. Peatland restoration will also provide a common focus for a wide range of upland interests to come together. The restoration activity can also be a catalyst around which improvements to the wider landscape can be delivered.

Adverse side effects to be managed

13.4.14 At the general level, there are no adverse effects. However, at individual site level there might be divergent views locally on the relative merits of restoration compared to other alternative land uses.

Summary of policies, development milestones and proposals

Policy outcome 1: To enhance the contribution of peatland to carbon storage, we will support an increase in the annual rate of peatland restoration, from 10,000 hectares in 2017/18 to 20,000 hectares per year thereafter.

Table 13-8: Policies that contribute to policy outcome 1

Policy

EU, UK or Scottish policy

Public sector partners

Delivery route

Restoration grants: We will provide grant funding to support eligible land managers to deliver peatland restoration. Levels of funding will enable at least 20,000 hectares of peatland restoration per year from 2018/19

Scottish

SNH

Public sector action will be led by SNH through the Peatland Action Initiative. In addition to providing support and advice, this will offer financial support to peatland restoration projects initiated by individual land managers. Experience from the Peatland Action Initiative to date demonstrates significant interest in restoration projects.

Awareness raising: Working through partnership, we will put in place tools and information to help develop the capacity, skills and knowledge of land managers, contractors and others, to deliver peatland restoration

Scottish

SNH, main research providers

This action will be carried out jointly with wider partners, particularly land managers and NGOs. Delivery will be supported through the provision of information and tools on peatland restoration.

Table 13-9: Policy outcome 1 over time

Policy outcome 1

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

2022

2023

2024

2025

2026

2027

2028

2029

2030

2031

2032

Hectares of peatland restored per year as a consequence of policies listed above

10,000 ha

20,000 ha

20,000 ha

20,000 ha

20,000 ha

20,000 ha

20,000 ha

20,000 ha

20,000 ha

20,000 ha

20,000 ha

20,000 ha

20,000 ha

20,000 ha

20,000 ha

20,000 ha

Peat progress since RPP2

Table 13-10: Progress since RPP2

Summary of progress

RPP2 highlighted that it had been assessed that it would be technically feasible to restore 20,000 hectares a year and that £1.7 million had been identified to support peatland restoration for the period 2013-2015.

Since RPP2 was published the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has published its technical guidance on measuring the greenhouse gas benefits of peatland restoration. This has allowed us to develop peatland restoration further and understand its costs and benefits. Reflecting the multiple benefits of peatland funding was identified in the 2013 spending review to support peatland restoration and through the SNH-led Peatland Action work over 10,000 hectares have been restored since 2013 through support to Peatland Action of £8.6 million.


Contact

Email: Kirsty Lewin

Phone: 0300 244 4000 – Central Enquiry Unit

The Scottish Government
St Andrew's House
Regent Road
Edinburgh
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