beta

You're viewing our new website - find out more

Publication - Research Finding

Whole system approach to young people who offend: evaluation

Published: 17 Jun 2015
Part of:
Law and order
ISBN:
9781785444296

An evaluation of our Whole System Approach (WSA) to young people who offend in Scotland.

75 page PDF

902.1kB

75 page PDF

902.1kB

Contents
Whole system approach to young people who offend: evaluation
Footnotes

75 page PDF

902.1kB

Footnotes

1. Juvenile Liaison Officer ( JLO) is not necessarily a national term but describes a role within Police Scotland that co-ordinates offence and concern referrals involving young people.

2. Deprivation scores are calculated at the 'data zone' level (which have a median population of 769), and are ranked from 'most deprived' (1), to 'least deprived' (6505). Deprivation is most commonly framed in terms of a 15% cut-off point (equivalent to 976 zones), which describes the 15% 'most deprived' areas in Scotland.

3. The Children's Hearing System is the first formal system that young people involved in offending are likely to encounter. Children may be referred from birth to 16 years under the Children's Hearing's (Scotland) Act 2011, if it is believed that a compulsory supervision order is necessary for the 'protection, guidance, treatment or control' of the child. A small number of young people aged 16 and 17 years are referred each year. These are young people with Compulsory Supervision Orders continued from when they were 15 years, or who are referred from the Sheriff Court.

4. The term ' PRS' is not used consistently across Scotland. For example, some practitioners refer to this stage as ' EEI'. This report uses the term PRS throughout.

5. Under Section 70 of the Children (Scotland) Act 1995.

6. Juvenile Liaision Officer is not necessarily a national term but describes a role within Police Scotland that co-ordinates offence and concern referrals. They cross reference information and make decisions about police direct measures and cases to be discussed at multi-agency screening meetings.

7. If a young person on Supervision is discussed at the multi-agency meeting and diverted, there is no requirement to notify the Children's Reporter, however this information would be included in the next Hearing report.

8. The use of fake identity cards constitutes fraud under the Identity Cards Act, 2006. A person found guilty may be liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding six months or to a fine not exceeding the statutory maximum, or to both.

9. Although practitioners reported that no-one had been evicted on offence grounds to date.


Contact