beta

You're viewing our new website - find out more

Publication - Publication

Fire and Rescue Framework for Scotland 2016

Published: 1 Sep 2016
Part of:
Law and order, Public safety and emergencies
ISBN:
9781786524119

The Fire and Rescue Framework for Scotland 2016 sets out priorities and objectives for the Scottish Fire and Rescue Service (SFRS).

32 page PDF

520.5kB

32 page PDF

520.5kB

Contents
Fire and Rescue Framework for Scotland 2016
Equality Impact Assessment

32 page PDF

520.5kB

Equality Impact Assessment

This equality impact assessment ( EQIA) has been developed to consider impacts on equality from the Fire and Rescue Framework for Scotland 2016, which will be brought into force by SSI - The Scottish Fire and Rescue Service (Framework) Order 2016.

The assessment is based on:

  • the EQIA for the Fire and Rescue Framework for Scotland 2013, and the responses received when it was consulted upon;
  • information gathered from desk-based research and evidence review, and evidence from relevant stakeholders and experts, as part of the development of the 2013 EQIA; and
  • more recent information provided by the Scottish Fire and Rescue Service ( SFRS) and obtained from recent publications and statistics.

The process of developing this EQIA has highlighted that there are a number of issues faced by people in equality groups (i.e.: race, gender, disability, age, sexual orientation, transgender, religion and belief) which are relevant to the Fire and Rescue Framework for Scotland 2016 ('the Framework'). Public Authorities have a duty under equalities legislation to promote equality by identifying and considering these issues; and indeed, such actions are vital to achieving stronger and safer communities.

The equality impact assessment sets out:

  • the aims of the Framework;
  • the equality issues faced by people in respect of race, gender, disability, age, sexual orientation, transgender, religion and belief and work which is going on to try to address relevant issues; and
  • potential impacts of the Framework.

This EQIA assesses the impact of this Framework and Ministerial priorities for the SFRS, and should be used by the SFRS when assessing the impact on equality groups of its policies, plans, services and delivery.

PART A - Fire and Rescue Services

Define the aims of the policy

Title of policy

The Fire and Rescue Framework for Scotland 2016

Strategic Outcomes

Safer and Stronger

Name of Branch or Division

Fire and Rescue Unit

Directorate or Agency

Safer Communities

What is the purpose of the proposed policy (or changes to be made to the policy)?

The Fire and Rescue Framework for Scotland 2016 will provide guidance and support to the SFRS on its priorities and objectives in carrying out its functions. It is a requirement of Section 40 of the Fire (Scotland) Act 2005 (as amended) that Scottish Ministers prepare such a Framework document, and do so in consultation with SFRS, bodies representing SFRS staff, COSLA and any other relevant bodies.

Who is affected by the policy or who is intended to benefit from the proposed policy and how?

The SFRS provides services to 5.2 million people across an area of 7.9 million hectares. On 31 March 2015, the headcount for SFRS staff (including volunteers) in Scotland totalled 8,281. (Scottish Fire and Rescue Service Fire Safety and Organisational Statistics 2014-15).

Employees and others who assist the SFRS to deliver its objectives in a non-employment capacity such as volunteers and retired employees participating in the Heritage Framework may be affected by the Framework and its impact on workforce and governance.

The people of Scotland will be affected in relation to fire and rescue service activity.

How have you, or will you, put the policy into practice, and who is or will be responsible for delivering it?

Delivery of the outcomes set out in the Framework will be the responsibility of the SFRS and the Scottish Government.

How does the policy fit into our wider or related policy initiatives?

Four national outcomes in particular underpin the aims of the Framework and our aspirations for reform:

  • we live longer, healthier lives (National Outcome 6);
  • we live our lives safe from crime, disorder and danger (National Outcome 9);
  • we have strong resilient and supportive communities where people take responsibility for their own actions and how they affect others (National Outcome 11); and
  • our public services are high quality, continually improving, efficient and responsive to local people's needs (National Outcome 16).

Do you have a set budget for this work?

No

What do you already know about the diverse needs and/or experiences of your target audience?

Do you have information on

Age

Yes

x

No

Disability

Yes

x

No

Gender

Yes

x

No

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender

Yes

x

No

Race

Yes

x

No

Religion and Belief

Yes

x

No

Age

Evidence

Communities - age equality issues

Older people

Scotland's population is ageing, and life expectancy for men and women is expected to increase by around 4-5 years by 2037. In the 10 years from 2004 to 2014, the ageing of the population was reflected in the number of children under 16 reducing by 3%, and the number of people aged 75 and over increasing by 17%. (Scotland's Population 2014 - the Registrar General's Annual Review of Demographic Trends).

We know that older people are more at risk from fire incidents. As people get older, it can become more difficult to detect and respond to fires. For example, it can become harder to hear smoke alarms, smell smoke, detect changes in heat and turn off appliances. Anecdotal evidence also suggests that older people may be more likely to possess older appliances, which have a greater potential to be faulty and increase the risk of fire.

Of the 41 fire fatalities in 2014-15, 25 were in the 60 and over age group.

The rate of fatal casualties in the 60 and over age group was almost 20 per million population, more than double the national average (just under 8 per million population).

The fire fatality rate in people over 60 has remained consistently higher than for any other age group, though it was nonetheless at its second lowest for ten years.

In 2014-15, there were provisionally 1,098 non-fatal fire casualties, 16% down from the previous year (1,311) (Fire and Rescue Statistics Scotland, 2014-15).

The non-fatal casualty rate for all age groups dropped in 2014-15 compared to 2013-14, though the over 60s remain at highest risk of injury in a fire with a casualty rate of 244 per million population compared to the national rate of 203 per million population.

However, age is not necessarily the only factor which contributes to make people more at risk from fire. The Scotland Together report on fire safety in 2009 stated that 90% of older people involved in a Fatal Fire Survey had other contributory factors, such as mobility problems, disability, mental health issues or alcohol involvement. Social deprivation was also highlighted as a key factor related to an increased risk from fire, which may be a particularly important issue in the current financial climate.

In addition, living alone tends to increase the risk of fire injury or death - 53% of accidental fire death incidents occur in single occupancy households and 51% occurring in flatted accommodation. As such, an ageing population, with an increasing number of people living alone, has the potential to lead to an increase in accidental dwelling fire deaths (Scotland Together).

The SFRS engages with agencies, other organisations and authorities who work with older people, to identify and target those in need of assistance and advice on fire safety. This type of multi-agency targeted approach is particularly important for older, vulnerable people, who may not be able to obtain information via the usual channels - for example they may not have access to the internet, or understand mainstream fire safety material. Information may need to be provided in accessible formats, such as easy read or large font. There are a number of initiatives, such as installing smoke/heat detectors or linked alarm systems, which also aim to reduce their vulnerability to fire.

Younger people

In 2014-15, the non-fatal casualty rate for those aged 0-16 was 89 non-fatal casualties per million population, less than half the national average of 203 per million population.

There are also issues in relation to young people and fire related anti-social behaviour, as well as evidence that young people are at a high risk of being involved in a road traffic collision. As such, targeting young people with education is key to promoting community safety and social responsibility.

The SFRS takes forward schools programmes and a formal national accreditation qualification for youth engagement programmes to educate young people on fire safety and decrease fire related anti-social behaviour (e.g. attacks on crews and fire hydrant damage). Many of these are delivered through a multi-agency approach. Topics of learning can include a range of issues, such as home fire safety, the dangers of making hoax calls, dangers of deliberate fire setting, road safety, alcohol and drug awareness, first aid and healthy eating (Scotland Together). Modified versions of courses are delivered to young people with disabilities. In addition, station-based personnel carry out activities with youth groups and schools. Road safety, fire safety and general outreach programmes are also run.

In terms of road traffic collisions, the highest number of male and female casualties is in the 16-22 age range (Key 2014 Reported Road Casualty Statistics).

The Children and Young People (Scotland) Act 2014

This legislation is a key part of the Scottish Government's strategy for making Scotland the best place in the world to grow up. By facilitating a shift in public services towards the early years of a child's life, and towards early intervention whenever a family or young person needs help, the legislation encourages preventative measures, rather than crises responses.

The Act places specific duties on the SFRS as a corporate parent to improve how the organisation as a whole supports looked after children and care leavers.

The SFRS is required under sections 59-61 of the Act to produce a plan and report on how it is exercising its corporate parenting duties, including its planning and collaborating functions.

Workforce - age equality issues

42% of all SFRS staff were in the 40-49 age range, 26% were within the 30-39 age range, 22 are in the 50 and over age range and 10% were under 30 years old.

The highest proportion of personnel were within the 40-49 age range, and 46% of 'other support staff' were 50 years and over. Retained duty system ( RDS) staff had the highest percentage of under 30 year olds, at 15%. Wholetime operational staff had the lowest percentage of staff in the 50 and over age range (15%), due to retirement arrangements for operational staff (Scottish Fire and Rescue Service Fire Safety and Organisational Statistics 2014-15).

The evidence indicates that, in respect of the workforce, there may be particular impacts on the following groups of people:

  • older members of the SFRS's workforce (e.g. in respect of utilising their knowledge and expertise);
  • retired employees who sometimes undertake fire safety visits (e.g. retaining the valuable service they provide); and
  • young people (e.g. continuing/maintaining youth engagement programmes. These aim to encourage young people to learn about fire safety, get involved, increase their skills and take this back to their communities. They can also prepare them for future employment in the Service).

There may also be equality issues affecting an ageing workforce, especially in relation to operational firefighters, such as maintaining operational fitness.

Disability

Evidence

Communities - disability equality issues

20% of people in Scotland are disabled according to the definition of the Disability Discrimination Act 1995 (Office for National Statistics - Census Results - 2011).

Disabilities can increase the likelihood of an individual accidentally causing a fire and can hinder escape when one occurs. The ONS Life Opportunities Survey ( ONS, 2010) found that 12% of adults with impairments experienced difficulty accessing rooms within their home or difficulty getting in or out of their home.

15% of fatal fires involved victims who suffered some form of mental impairment. 30% of fatal fires involved victims with physical impairment, rising to 39% when age related physical impairment is included (Arson Control Forum, Learning Lessons from Real Fires: Findings from Fatal Fire Investigation Reports - 2006).

In terms of mental health concerns, of the 177 fire deaths across the Scottish Fatal Fire Survey, 16 were recorded as suicide (Scotland Together, 2009).

The term disability covers a wide range of impairment types and conditions and it is important to recognise that disabled people are not a homogenous group and will have a range of needs and experiences. For example, someone who has a physical disability is likely to have very different needs to someone who is Deafblind; and particularly vulnerable people and people with learning difficulties may have difficulty understanding the dangers fire presents to their safety. As such, a variety of fire safety initiatives are necessary to support disabled people and decrease their vulnerability to fire incidents.

Some disabled people (e.g. Deaf and Deafblind people whose first language is British Sign Language ( BSL) not English, Deafened people and people with cerebral palsy or multiple sclerosis) may experience difficulties communicating with the SFRS. This may be in relation to contacting the Service, at incidents or in community education and enforcement activities. Similarly, targeted communication is important in relation to reducing road traffic accidents.

Social and economic factors often increase the fire risks for disabled people, particularly where people have restricted financial resources. As such, the support required by disabled people varies depending on the relevant social and economic factors which are prevalent in each geographic area. Disabled people in more isolated areas may be especially reliant on public service provision to decrease their isolation and engage in public life.

The SFRS works with other groups, organisations, authorities and agencies to identify disabled people who may be vulnerable, helping to make their premises safe as well as improve their awareness of fire safety. For example:

  • work undertaken with social care services and health agencies has helped identify mental health patients at risk from fire. The SFRS can then perform a risk assessment and provide specific advice to assist in this respect;
  • specialist fire alarms (which use lights and vibrating pads) can be installed to alert people who are deaf to the occurrence of a fire;
  • heat/smoke detectors can be installed in linked alarms (which alert emergency services directly and can be installed in peoples' homes where they may not be able to telephone for help);
  • the SFRS could place BSL video clips on websites, and provide easy-read and accessible information on fire safety;
  • deaf awareness and sign language courses have been run in response to local need;
  • local voluntary and other organisations work in partnership with the SFRS - for example, to ensure older and disabled people have a working fire alarm. Voluntary and other such organisations often have access to people who may feel uncomfortable contacting public bodies or authorities, and are a valuable tool for reaching some of the most vulnerable people within communities; and
  • the SFRS provides general information and advice on fire safety to a wide range of people, for example guidance to businesses about safe emergency evacuation from premises for wheelchair users.

To assist SFRS staff in responding to the needs of disabled people, the SFRS provides training on equality and diversity. For example a programme of Mainstreaming Equality training was rolled out across the SFRS in late 2015/early 2016 specifically targeting those personnel key in ensuring embedded equality.

Fire and rescue service workforce - disability equality issues

Overall, 0.3 % of SFRS staff were recorded as disabled. The highest proportion was 2.2% in the control staff category, and the lowest proportion was 0.2% in the whole-time operational and RDS staff (Scottish Fire and Rescue Service Fire Safety and Organisational Statistics 2014-15). However, it should be noted that there are some people who may not feel comfortable disclosing that they are disabled to their employers and therefore were not accounted for in these figures.

Where a suitable post is available, the SFRS will have redeployment procedures in place for operational personnel who become disabled during their career. There are also employee networks to help support disabled people.

Gender (including pregnancy and maternity)

Evidence

Communities - gender equality issues

Scotland's population figure for 2011 has a gender split of 51.5% females to 48.5% males (2011 Census: First Results on Population Estimates for Scotland).

In terms of fire incidents, males are more likely than females to: be injured in a fire; need to be rescued from a fire; or, die in fires. This has been a consistent trend over the last decade.

In 2014-15 there were 41 fire deaths, 23 of which were male (56%).

There were also 1,080 injuries where the gender was recorded (7 where the gender was not recorded). Of these 57% were male and 43% female.

In 2014 there were more males than females who were killed or seriously injured in road traffic collisions. 149 males were killed in comparison with 51 females. 1085 males were seriously injured, whilst 609 females were seriously injured (Key 2014 Reported Road Casualty Statistics).

In terms of gender equality issues affecting women, domestic violence has the potential to be related to a fire incident. Women are more likely to be the victim of domestic violence - in 81% of cases of domestic abuse there is a female victim and male perpetrator (Scottish Women's Aid website). To help combat this, the SFRS have undertaken some work on Violence Against Women - raising awareness, and ensuring that personnel know what to do if it is identified during a Home Fire Safety Visit.

Workforce - gender equality issues

  • 87.2% of the fire and rescue service workforce was male and 12.8% female.
  • Of the 1,064 female staff, 45.1% were working in the other support staff category.
  • Of the 7,217 male staff, the majority, 51.2% were working as wholetime operational staff.
  • The proportion of females was highest in control staffing at 83.5% (192 out of 230).
  • The proportion of males was highest in wholetime operational staffing at 96.4% (3692 out of 3856) (Scottish Fire and Rescue Service Fire Safety and Organisational Statistics 2014-15).

Women are more likely to have part-time working or flexible working arrangements (by virtue of generally being households' primary carers).

For 2014-15, there was a headcount of 867 support staff. The full-time equivalent was 744. This group had the largest number of staff working part-time. Although we do not know exact part-time hours, there was a 14% decrease from headcount to full-time equivalent.

The SFRS undertakes equality and diversity training to help address equality issues, raise awareness and ensure good practice in the workplace. This includes providing information on gender equality.

The SFRS are also leading a project on behalf of the Justice Board to improve the representation of women and other under-represented groups across the Justice sector.

The Fire Brigades Union ( FBU) has a specific section of the Union for uniformed female staff, and Unison has a women's section, where support and advice can be sought.

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender

Evidence

Communities - LGBT equality issues

It is difficult to obtain accurate data on this equality group; however, it is generally accepted that Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender ( LGBT) people make up around 5% of the population of Scotland (Cited in Scottish Government - Challenging Prejudice: Changing Attitudes towards Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender People in Scotland - 2008). Stonewall estimates that around 200,000 gay people live in Scotland.

Anecdotal evidence from Stonewall suggests that people identifying as LGBT are less likely to approach uniformed emergency services due to the image of emergency services as being 'unwelcoming' - although the LGBT community is very diverse in itself and the experiences of individuals can differ from area to area. Some examples of good practice in helping break down these barriers, and encouraging community engagement, include the SFRS: becoming members of Stonewall's Equality Champions programme; working with LGBT Youth Scotland and the Equality Network; participating in Edinburgh and Glasgow Pride; engaging with local groups/organisations; and ensuring that community safety messages are inclusive and widely distributed.

There is some evidence that LGBT people from more rural areas often relocate to one of the large cities as they reach adulthood. Moving is not generally an option for those young people still in school or those with limited social mobility. Issues affecting people outside large metropolitan areas can be different to those within; therefore engagement to address needs has to occur at a local level.

Fire and rescue service workforce - LGBT equality issues

It is difficult to obtain reliable information on the numbers of LGBT individuals employed in the workforce, particularly given that some LGBT people may not wish to disclose this information.

The SFRS through its equality and diversity training will aim to raise awareness and help ensure good practice in the workplace. It includes information on the issues faced by LGBT people.

The FBU has a specific section of the Union for uniformed LGBT members, where support and advice can be sought. The SFRS is going to try to set up an employee LGBT network in 2016.

Race

Evidence

Communities - race equality issues

According to the 2011 Census the size of the minority ethnic population in 2011 was just over 200,000 or 4 per cent of the total population of Scotland (based on 2011 ethnicity classification); this has doubled since 2001 when just over 100,000 or 2 per cent of the total population of Scotland (based on the 2001 ethnicity classification) were from a minority ethnic group.

Some parts of Scotland have reasonably large numbers of people from minority ethnic groups living in them. There are significant regional variations in this respect, with Glasgow having the most ethnically diverse population in Scotland and some rural areas having very low minority ethnic profiles.

Some of the largest minority ethnic populations in Scotland are comprised of long established and well integrated communities; while some newer communities are less integrated, smaller, more dispersed and can retain some customs that may present as a fire risk (e.g. methods of cooking). Established communities often have a significant profile at regional and national levels, with long-standing relationships with the SFRS. Newer communities are less likely to be aware of public services in general and are more likely to move residence. This poses specific issues in supporting them and keeping their properties safe from fire. Minority ethnic communities may often also require targeted communications, particularly where English is not their first language.

Travelling communities, whether in permanent and static or non-static or semi-static residences, often have reduced access to services, may be vulnerable to fire risk and may experience isolation from the broader population. Therefore establishing trust with individual local communities and building personal relationships is particularly important.

The SFRS works with community groups and organisations, stakeholder representatives and equality organisations to target, protect and educate ethnic minority communities. The SFRS also participate at events such as the annual Mela in Edinburgh and Glasgow.

The SFRS launched a project on Accessible Communications in 2015 which includes communicating with people whose first language isn't English. Previous work has included:

  • the use of pictorial phrase booklets where language barriers have been identified as a particular regional issue;
  • use of translation services, such as Happy to Translate and Languageline, as well as local services and partner organisations specialising in community languages specific to certain regional areas; and
  • working with fire services from other countries and using these links to assist work with Scotland's local communities.

The SFRS provides equality and diversity training which includes specific information to help address race equality issues.

Workforce - race equality issues

Of Scotland's fire and rescue service staff, 0.5% were recorded as belonging to a minority ethnic group.

The highest proportion of minority ethnic staff were in other support staff roles (1.2%) and the lowest proportion of minority ethnic staff were in RDS (0.1%) (Scottish Fire and Rescue Service Fire Safety and Organisational Statistics 2014-15).

The FBU has a specific section of the Union for uniformed staff who are from a minority ethnic background, where support and advice can be sought.

Religion and Belief

Evidence

There is some evidence that certain religious practices and cooking habits (e.g. frying at high temperatures, deep fat cooking) may increase the risk of domestic fires. For example an Office of the Deputy Prime Minister ( ODPM) report in October of 2002, on Establishing Fire Safety Issues Among Older People, found that Hindu respondents conceded that religious rituals and festivals could increase fire risks. However, all said they took particular care to not leave incense burning unattended or to light too many candles at Diwali. This suggests it may be useful to target fire safety advice to religious groups especially around the time of festivals or other events.

Sectarianism also remains an issue to varying degrees within Scotland, and one that the SFRS are aware of.

The SFRS works at a local level with faith groups and their centres of worship.

Do you have enough information to help you understand the diverse needs and/or experiences of your target audience? If not, what else do you need to know?

Age

Do you have enough information to proceed?

Yes

No

Yes. Information was collected via desk research, from the EQIA for the Fire and Rescue Framework for Scotland 2013, and through engagement with the SFRS.

Disability

Do you have enough information to proceed?

Yes

No

Yes - refer to information in Disability section.

Gender (including pregnancy and maternity)

Do you have enough information to proceed?

Yes

No

Yes - refer to information in Gender section.

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender

Do you have enough information to proceed?

Yes

No

Yes - refer to information in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender section.

Race

Do you have enough information to proceed?

Yes

No

Yes - refer to information in Race section.

Religion and Belief

Do you have enough information to proceed?

Yes

No

Yes - refer to information in Religion and Belief section.

What does the information you have tell you about how this policy might impact positively or negatively on the different groups within the target audience?

Summary of potential impacts of the Framework

In itself, the Fire and Rescue Framework for Scotland 2016 should not adversely affect people in equality groups, particularly given that its primary function is to provide guidance and support to the SFRS on its priorities and objectives, set in the context of the overarching purpose that the SFRS should adhere to in carrying out its functions. It sets out Scottish Ministers' expectations of the SFRS as it moves from a period of reform towards as an established organisation.

The Framework will have a positive impact on equality as it provides specifically for the improvement of performance across all equality strands at the core of the SFRS business objectives. The Framework requires the SFRS to build on work already done to recruit, retain and progress individuals from underrepresented groups from across all areas of Scotland and at all levels.

However, it will be important to:

  • Maintain current good practice;
  • Continue to ensure that equality and diversity is prioritised by providing equality in access to and delivery of training and development initiatives;
  • Prioritise the SFRS's corporate social responsibilities in the execution of the procurement function and in line with Public Sector Equality Duty (specific duties) requirements;
  • Meet statutory obligations to provide aids, adaptations and support to employees requiring additional support in the use of ICT due to disability;
  • Compliance with equality legislation, including taking the necessary steps to ensure the introduction of the Public Sector Equality Duty 'specific duties'; and
  • Monitor equality performance in line with statutory responsibilities.

Age

Communities - age equality impacts

The Scottish Government recognises that appropriate, effective and responsive public services cannot be developed in isolation of the recipient of those services and that partnership working and appropriate community involvement are essential. By equality impact assessing its policies, practices and functions, the SFRS will need to gather and analyse the evidence relating to different groups of people, including the disabled, minority ethnic communities, the elderly and so on. By assessing the impact of its services, policies and practices against the needs of equality groups, the SFRS will be better equipped to deliver a service that meets the needs of Scotland's diverse communities. Impact assessment is a key tool to support the continuous improvement of public services and to prevent discrimination or barriers to service arising in the first place.

SFRS workforce - impacts

The Framework sets out that the SFRS must invest in its current workforce and plan for the type of workforce it will need in the future. As part of this the SFRS should promote workforce diversity through inclusive recruitment and retention practices and initiatives, and ensure that its systems and processes promote the health, safety and well-being of all staff. This should ensure that workforce development, promoting health and well-being and harmonious industrial relations remain priorities.

The general public sector equality duty was introduced in the Equality Act 2010 and came into force on 5 April 2011. Under this general duty, the SFRS must have due regard to the need to eliminate unlawful discrimination, advance equality of opportunity and foster good relations. The SFRS is included in the list of public bodies under the Equality Act 2010 (Specific Duties) (Scotland) Regulations 2012 and has to fulfil the duties therein, demonstrating consideration of equality issues in all corporate decision making. The SFRS is also required to report performance against a set of equality outcomes, and also against the mainstreaming of equality across all functions and all levels of the organisation.

Disability

Communities - disability equality impacts

See entry under Disability.

Fire and rescue service - workforce - impacts

See entry under Disability.

Gender (including pregnancy and maternity)

Communities - gender equality impacts

See entry under Gender.

Fire and rescue service - workforce - impacts

See entry under Gender.

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender

Communities - LGBT equality impacts

See entry under Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender.

Fire and rescue service - workforce - impacts

See entry under Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender.

Race

Communities - race equality impacts

See entry under Race.

Fire and rescue service - workforce - impacts

See entry under Race.

Religion and Belief

Communities - religion and belief equality impacts

See entry under Religion and Belief.

Fire and rescue service - workforce - impacts

See entry under Religion and Belief.

Will you be making any changes to your policy?

Are there any changes?

Age

Yes

No

x

Disability

Yes

No

x

Gender (including pregnancy and maternity)

Yes

No

x

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender

Yes

No

x

Race

Yes

No

x

Religion and Belief

Yes

No

x

Does your policy provide the opportunity to promote equality of opportunity or good relations by altering the policy or working with others?

Age

Yes

x

No

Disability

Yes

x

No

Gender (including pregnancy and maternity)

Yes

x

No

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender

Yes

x

No

Race

Yes

x

No

Religion and Belief

Yes

x

No

Age

As an essential public service right at the heart of our communities, the SFRS must strive to meet its equalities duties. The mainstreaming of equality across policy and practice is key to the delivery of services relevant to the needs of communities, and the fostering of a healthy and prosperous workplace. Improving performance across all equality groups and in all that it does as an employer and service provider must remain at the core of the SFRS's business objectives.

Disability

See entry for Disability.

Gender (including pregnancy and maternity)

See entry for Gender.

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender

See entry for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender.

Race

See entry for Race.

Religion and Belief

See entry for Religion and Belief.

Based on the work you have done - rate the level of relevance of your policy

Tick one box for each strand

Age

Disability

Gender including pregnancy and maternity

LGBT

Religion and belief

Race

High

- There is substantial evidence that people from different groups or communities are (or could be) differently affected by the policy (positively or negatively).

- There is substantial public concern about the policy, or concerns have been raised about the policy's potential impact by relevant bodies.

- The policy is relevant to all or part of the respective general duty, in the case of race, disability and gender.

x

x

x

x

x

x

Medium

- There is some evidence that people from different groups or communities are (or could be) differently affected (positively or negatively).

- There is some public concern about the policy.

- The policy is relevant to parts of the respective general duty, in the case of race, disability and gender.

Low

- There is little or no evidence that some people from different groups or communities are (or could be) differently affected (positively or negatively).

- There is little or no evidence of public concern about the policy.

- The policy has little or no relevance to the respective general duty, in the case of race, disability and gender.

Unknown

- No evidence or data has been collected therefore an assessment cannot be made

Is a further impact assessment required?

Age

Yes

No

x

Disability

Yes

No

x

Gender (including pregnancy and maternity)

Yes

No

x

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender

Yes

No

x

Race

Yes

No

x

Religion and Belief

Yes

No

x

If you have answered yes please explain why

Please explain how you will monitor and evaluate this policy/function or strategy to measure progress?

Please explain how monitoring will be undertaken, when it will take place and who is responsible for undertaking it.

Data about workforce and fire incidents is published by the SFRS.

Fire and Rescue Unit officials in the Scottish Government have policy responsibility for oversight of such information, drawing significant issues to Scottish Ministers' attention and developing and implementing changes to policy for Ministers and the Scottish Parliament to consider as appropriate.

The impact assessment should now be authorised by either the Division or Group Head or equivalent.

Policy Title

Fire and Rescue Framework for Scotland 2016

Strategic Outcome

Safer and Stronger

Name of Branch or Division

Fire and Rescue Unit

Directorate or Agency

Learning and Justice

We have completed the equality impact assessment for this policy.

Name: Siân Ledger

Position: Team Leader, Fire and Rescue Unit

Date: 2016

Authorisation by Deputy Director or equivalent

Name: Wendy Wilkinson

Position: Deputy Director of Safer Communities

Date: 2016


Contact

Email: Iain Harron, Iain.Harron@scot.gov