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Publication - Guidance

Healthy eating in schools: a guide to implementing the nutritional requirements for Food and Drink in Schools (Scotland) Regulations 2008

Published: 17 Sep 2008
Part of:
Education, Farming and rural, Health and social care
ISBN:
9780755958306

Guidance on implementing the nutritional requirements for Food and Drink in Schools (Scotland) Regulations 2008.

92 page PDF

367.7kB

92 page PDF

367.7kB

Contents
Healthy eating in schools: a guide to implementing the nutritional requirements for Food and Drink in Schools (Scotland) Regulations 2008
Annex 2: Step-by-step guide on how to select savoury snacks that meet the specific criteria

92 page PDF

367.7kB

Annex 2: Step-by-step guide on how to select savoury snacks that meet the specific criteria

What savoury snacks can be served in school food outlets outwith the school lunch?

Only pre-packaged savoury snacks (e.g. crisps, 'crisp-like' products, and savoury biscuits) that meet specific criteria are allowed to be served 'outwith' the school lunch.

Savoury snacks are defined as pre-packaged items which can be eaten without preparation and consist of or include as a basic ingredient potatoes, other root vegetables, cereals, nuts and seeds. This does not include sandwiches and nuts and seeds without added salt, sugar and fat.

The criteria state that savoury snacks cannot be served in more than 25g portions and must contain no more than:

  • 22g of fat per 100g
  • 2g of saturates per 100g
  • 0.6g of sodium per 100g
  • 3g of total sugars per 100g

Step 1

  • Look at the food label. Make sure that the pack size of the savoury snack is not more than 25 grams.

If the pack size is greater than 25g, it cannot be provided in school food outlets outwith the school lunch.

Step 2

If the pack size is 25g or less:

  • look at the nutrition information panel on the savoury snack label to find out the amount of fat, saturates and sodium per 100g of the savoury snack.
  • nutrition information panel shows the amount of nutrients per 100g and per serving of the food. Below is an example of typical nutrition information panel.
  • look at the 'per 100g' column on the nutrition information panel.

Step 3

  • Although there are a number of nutrients shown on the nutrient information panel, focus on the amount of fat, saturates, sugars and sodium per 100g of the savoury snack.

Example A: Crisps

Example A: Crisps

  • If the nutrient information panel does not display information on sugars, saturates or sodium (manufacturers are not obliged to provide this information on the label), you will need to contact the manufacturer directly to find out the amounts per 100g.

Step 4

  • Compare the information on Nutrition Information Panel per 100g with the nutrient criteria.

Nutrient Criteria

The crisps given as Example A CANNOT be served 'outwith' the school lunch because they do not meet the sugars criterion.


Contact

Email: Central Enquiries Unit, ceu@gov.scot

Post:
The Scottish Government
St Andrew’s House
Edinburgh
EH1 3DG