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Publication - Publication

15 to 24 Learner Journey Review phase one: analysis

Published: 21 Mar 2018
Directorate:
Learning Directorate
Part of:
Economy, Education, Work and skills
ISBN:
9781788517003

Analysis undertaken as part of stage one of the Learner Journey review examining current education and training provision for 15 to 24 year olds in Scotland.

84 page PDF

1.7 MB

84 page PDF

1.7 MB

Contents
15 to 24 Learner Journey Review phase one: analysis
3. College Provision in Scotland

84 page PDF

1.7 MB

3. College Provision in Scotland

This section examines the available information around college provision in Scotland, with a focus on Further Education ( FE) courses.

How many individuals are studying FE courses or qualifications?

Table 3.1 shows the number and proportion of FE students, by age, in 2015/16. The age category with the largest number of students is those aged 25+ in which there were around 81,380 students – 43.9 per cent of the total number of FE students.

By examining the younger age categories, we can observe that there were more students aged under 16 than there were aged 16 or aged 17. Just less than 12 per cent of total FE students were aged under 16 compared to 6.9 per cent aged 16 and 9.2 per cent aged 17.

Table 3.1: Number of FE Students by Age, 2015/16

Age of Student in December Number of Students Proportion of Total Students (%)
Under 16 21,815 12
16 12,720 7
17 17,045 9
18-19 25,365 14
20-24 27,080 15
25 & over 81,380 44
OVERALL 185,405  

Source: SFC, ' Infact database ' [Accessed 6 February 2018]
Number of students, by age of student (in December incl 16 17), by level of study (2015/16).
Figures have been rounded to the nearest 5. Proportions calculated on unrounded figures.

The figures presented in Table 3.1 include MA's and school-based students (such as senior phase pupils studying a course at college or primary pupils on school-link programmes). If we are to omit these students from the table, to better represent the cohort that are college based we find that the proportion of total pupils from the younger age categories is lower. Table 3.2 highlights that of this cohort 1 per cent of these students aged under 16 with less than 5 per cent aged 16. More than half of these students are aged 25 and over.

Table 3.2: Number of FE Students by Age with omission of school-based students/ MA's, 2015/16

Age of student in December Number of Students Proportion of Total Students (%)
Under 16 1,265 1
16 6,005 4
17 10,550 7
18-19 21,885 15
20-24 23,820 17
25 & over 80,260 56
Total 143,790  

Source: SFC, ' Infact database ' Number of students, by age of student (in December incl 16 17), by level of study (2015/16) [accessed 6 February 2018]
Note: Students categorised as school-based, primary school "students", other school-link students, and MA's have been omitted.
Figures have been rounded to the nearest 5. Proportions calculated on unrounded figures.

How many school leavers are progressing to FE?

Table 3.3 shows the number and percentage of school leavers progressing to FE in each year between 2009/10 and 2015/16. The proportion of school leavers progressing to FE has remained broadly consistent over this period although it has slightly decreased for the most recent two years. In 2015/16, 22.4 per cent of total school leavers progressed to FE.

Table 3.3: Number and percentage of school leavers whose follow-up destination category is FE, 2009/10 to 2015/16

2009/10 2010/11 2011/12 2012/13 2013/14 2014/15 2015/16
Number 12,889 13,099 12,320 12,606 12,464 12,269 11,661
Percentage 24.3 24.6 24.8 24.5 24.3 23.4 22.4

Source: Scottish Government (2017), ' Attainment and Leaver Destinations Supplementary Data 15/16 '

Table 3.4 examines school leavers progressing to FE by stage of leaving. It shows that S4 leavers were most likely to progress to FE with 38 per cent of total S4 leavers advancing to FE compared to 33 per cent of S5 leavers and just 15 per cent of S6 leavers.

Table 3.4: School leavers whose follow-up destination category is FE by stage of leaving, 2015/16

Student stage Total number of leavers Number progressing to FE Proportion of total leavers progressing to FE (%)
S4 5,755 2,165 38
S5 13,117 4,338 33
S6 33,186 5,140 15

Source: Scottish Government (2017), ' Attainment and Leaver Destinations Supplementary Data 15/16 '

What can be said about the levels of attainment for those school leavers progressing to FE?

Table 3.5 shows the percentage of school leavers by highest SCQF level at which one or more passes were achieved and follow-up destination category.

The data shows that those leavers who have no passes at SCQF 3 or better, or their highest qualification is at either SCQF level 3, 4 or 5, were much more likely to progress to FE than HE. On the contrary, those leavers with qualifications at SCQF level 6 or 7 were much more likely to progress to HE than FE.

Those leavers whose highest qualification was at SCQF level 5 – equivalent to SQA National 5's - were most likely to progress to FE (41.4 per cent) followed by those whose highest qualification was at SCQF level 4 (34.1 per cent). Leavers with one or more qualifications at SCQF level 7 – equivalent to Advanced Higher qualifications - were least likely of all groups to progress to FE (3.8 per cent).

Table 3.5: Percentage of school leavers by highest SCQF level at which one or more passes were achieved and follow-up destination category, 2015/16

Follow-up Destination No passes at SCQF 3 or better (%) SCQF level 3 (%) SCQF level 4 (%) SCQF level 5 (%) SCQF level 6 (%) SCQF level 7 (%) Total (%)
Higher Education 1.2 - 0.3 2.0 48.6 84.0 37.3
Further Education 21.1 27.2 34.1 41.4 17.0 3.8 22.4
Training 6.7 * 6.0 2.3 0.5 * 1.7
Employment 18.5 18.6 30.9 42.4 29.7 10.1 28.7
Voluntary Work 0.5 * 0.5 0.3 0.4 0.7 0.4
Activity Agreement 7.8 9.2 3.8 0.6 0.1 * 0.9
Positive Destinations 55.8 63.4 75.6 89.1 96.2 98.7 91.4
Unemployed Seeking 22.9 22.1 17.9 7.7 2.5 0.9 5.8
Unemployed Not Seeking 17.0 11.1 4.7 2.1 0.7 0.4 1.9
Unknown 4.3 3.4 1.9 1.2 0.6 0.1 0.9
Other Destinations 44.2 36.6 24.4 10.9 3.8 1.3 8.6
Number of Leavers 1,061 861 5,561 12,470 22,195 9,965 52,113

Source: Scottish Government (2017), ' Attainment and Leaver Destinations Supplementary Data 15/16 '
Notes: 1. Percentages may not total 100 due to rounding. 2. In April 2011 the Scottish Government rolled out the use of Activity Agreements.
*Percentages based on less than 5 have been suppressed for disclosure and quality reasons.
MA's are included in the 'employment' category.

How has the number of individuals completing sub-degree qualifications, such as HNC/D's and other undergraduate degrees changed over time?

Table 3.6 shows the number of Scottish domiciled qualifiers and enrolments on HNC's, HND's and 'other undergraduate degrees' in the period from 2007/08 to 2015/16. The table shows that the number of qualifiers from HNC and HND programmes has remained broadly stable over this period but has increased slightly in the most recent three years. The number of enrolments has also remained fairly constant.

For those doing 'other undergraduate degrees' the number of qualifiers and enrolments has fallen significantly over the period. In 2007/08 there were 33,345 enrolments in other undergraduate degrees. This had fallen to 13,245 by 2015/16. While the number of qualifiers has also fallen from 6,395 in 2007/08 to 3,765 by 2015/16 proportionally more people are now qualifying, with 28 per cent of enrolments in 2015/16 resulting in a qualification in comparison to 19 per cent in 2007/08.

Table 3.6: Scottish domiciled enrolments and qualifiers on other undergraduate degrees at Scottish HEI's (incl. Open University)

2007/08 2008/09 2009/10 2010/11 2011/12 2012/13 2013/14 2014/15 2015/16
Enrolments
HNC, HND 4,850 4,530 4,370 3,915 3,685 3,510 4,690 4,750 4,745
Other undergraduate degrees 33,345 33,465 29,960 26,410 22,785 20,915 17,185 14,855 13,245
Qualifiers
HNC, HND 1,865 1,645 1,605 1,700 1,765 1,830 2,180 2,235 2,485
Other undergraduate degrees 6,395 5,910 4,775 5,340 5,540 5,590 4,500 3,970 3,765

Source: SG Analysis of HESA Student Data
Figures have been rounded to the nearest 5.

What are the destinations of college leavers?

Table 3.7 provides an overview of the destinations of successful full-time FE college qualifiers in 2015/16. The destinations were confirmed for 88.7 per cent of leavers.

The destination statistics below are for percentage of all qualifiers, rather than just for those with confirmed destinations. It shows that 84.1 per cent of FE leavers are in positive destinations compared to 4.5 per cent that are in negative destinations (with 11.3 per cent unconfirmed).

The majority of FE leavers progress to further study with 38.1 per cent entering further study at FE level and 31.2 per cent entering further study at HE level. A very small proportion (0.3 per cent) progressed to FE training, with a further 14.5 per cent entering employment.

Table 3.7 also shows that 4.5 per cent of FE leavers progressed to negative destinations with 2.9 per cent becoming unemployed and looking for work and 1.6 per cent unavailable for work.

Table 3.7: Overview of the destinations of those in Further Education in colleges in 2015/16

FE full-time qualifiers in the 2015/16 session 33,019
FE confirmed destinations: 88.7%
FE unconfirmed destinations: 11.3%
Percentage of FE leavers in positive destinations:  
FE qualifiers entering further FE study: 38.1%
FE qualifiers entering further HE study: 31.2%
FE qualifiers moving into FE training: 0.3%
FE qualifiers entering employment: 14.5%
Total:* 84.1%
Percentage of FE leavers in negative destinations:  
FE leavers unemployed and looking for work: 2.9%
FE leavers unavailable for work: 1.6%
Total:* 4.5%

Source: SFC (2017), ' College Leaver Destinations 2015/16 '
* Total percentages may differ from component percentages as a result of rounding to one decimal place.

The SFC College Leavers Destinations publication also provides statistics for HE full-time qualifiers. The results of which are presented in Table 3.8.

Table 3.8 shows that over 50 per cent of HE college qualifiers progressed to further study with 22.9 per cent progressing from a HND to university, 18.1 per cent from a HNC to an HND, and 10.8 per cent from a HNC to university. A further 21.9 per cent of HE qualifiers entered employment upon leaving.

The proportion of HE qualifiers entering negative destinations was very slightly lower than the proportion of FE qualifiers entering negative destinations (4.2 per cent versus 4.5 per cent).

Table 3.8: Overview of the destinations of those in Higher Education in colleges in 2015/16

HE full-time qualifiers in the 2015/16 session 17,663
HE confirmed destinations 84.4%
HE unconfirmed destinations 15.6%
Percentage of HE leavers in positive destinations:  
HNC to HND: 18.1%
HNC to university (or equivalent level): 10.8%
HND to university (or equivalent level): 22.9%
Other HE leavers' Progress: 6.5%
HE qualifiers entering employment: 21.9%
Total*: 80.2%
Percentage of HE leavers in negative destinations:  
HE qualifiers unemployed and looking for work: 3.0%
HE qualifiers unavailable for work: 1.2%
Total*: 4.2%

Source: SFC (2017),' College Leaver Destinations 2015/16 '
*Total percentages may differ from component percentages as a result of rounding to one decimal place.

What are the destinations of qualifiers leaving the college sector?

In 2015/16, 18,062 qualifiers from full-time courses - with confirmed destinations - left the college sector. This is around 40 per cent of all qualifiers with confirmed destinations.

The destinations of these qualifiers, who left the sector, are shown in Table 3.9 below.

It is evident that of the 18,062 who exited Scotland's colleges with confirmed destinations the main moves were into positive destinations, specifically university and work. University accounted for 39.7 per cent (7,171) of those leaving the sector while almost half, 47.9 per cent, went into work (8,646).

SFC believe that the secured destinations of those leaving the college sector reveal a positive value for securing both work and university educational opportunities. College education is not university education, but the destinations show a system which moves people positively on their journeys.

Table 3.9: Qualifiers leaving the college sector (confirmed destinations)

External Destination Number of qualifiers (confirmed destinations) % of all qualifiers leaving college sector % of all qualifiers
FE to University 1,027 5.7% 2.3%
HE to University 6,144 34.0% 13.9%
FE/ HE into work 8,646 47.9% 19.6%
Unemployed 1,499 8.3% 3.4%
Unavailable for work 746 4.1% 1.7%
Total 18,062 100% 40.9%

Source: SFC (2017),' College Leaver Destinations 2015/16 '

What were the destinations of college leavers by gender?

Table 3.10 shows that for the 2015/16 college leaver cohort, a slightly higher proportion of females (76.3 per cent) progressed to further study than males (74.2 per cent). The opposite is true when considering the progressing to 'work' with males (21.0 per cent) slightly more likely to take this route than females (18.5 per cent).

Table 3.10: Broad Destination Split by Gender, 2015/16

Male Female All
Qualifiers with confirmed destinations 19,228 (43.6%) 24,923 (56.4%) 44,183
Further Study 74.2% 76.3% 75.4%
Work 21.0% 18.5% 19.6%
Other Destination 0.7% 1.7% 1.2%
Negative Destination 4.1% 3.6% 3.8%

Source: SFC (2017),' College Leaver Destinations 2015/16 '
Note: As the all column contains Male/Female/Other/Not Specified, totals may not sum.

What do we know about the destination of college leavers by SIMD status?

Table 3.11 looks at the confirmed destinations of college leavers by SIMD decile. SFC state that positive destinations for qualifiers in each of the SIMD deciles were in the range from 94.2 per cent to 96.1 per cent. However, there were more notable differences in the breakdown between further study and employment destinations. Those from the most deprived deciles were less likely to progress to work and more likely to progress to further study than those from least deprived deciles. SFC believe that this may be explained by these groups starting college with lower level qualifications (on average) and experiencing a longer learner journey to reach the required level of qualification for their chosen career path.

Table 3.11 also shows that those from more deprived SIMD deciles were slightly more likely to progress to negative destinations than those from the least deprived SIMD deciles.

Table 3.11: Confirmed Destinations by 2012 SIMD Decile

1 (most deprived) 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 (least deprived) Total
Number of Qualifiers 7,449 6,185 5,515 4,834 4,360 3,769 3,366 3,223 3,015 2,176 44,183
Further Study 79.1% 77.6% 76.3% 73.7% 74.2% 72.8% 73.3% 73.3% 74.7% 76.5% 75.4%
Work 15.7% 17.4% 18.3% 20.5% 21.0% 21.7% 22.2% 21.9% 20.7% 19.6% 19.6%
Other Destination 1.1% 1.1% 1.4% 1.2% 1.1% 1.4% 1.5% 1.3% 0.8% 1.2% 1.2%
Negative Destination 4.1% 3.8% 3.9% 4.6% 3.6% 4.2% 3.1% 3.4% 3.8% 2.7% 3.8%

Source: SFC (2017),' College Leaver Destinations 2015/16 '
Total percentages may differ from component percentages as a result of rounding to one decimal place.

What do we know about the destination of college leavers by Disability Status?

Table 3.12 examines the destination of college leavers by their Disability Status. Of the 50,682 qualifiers in 2015/16, 8,476 declared one or more disabilities (16.7 per cent of the cohort). Of these, the destinations were confirmed for 7,504 qualifiers.

In Table 3.12 we can observe that a slightly higher proportion of those with one or more disability progressed to further study (77.2 per cent) compared to those with no disability (75.0 per cent). Additionally, a slightly higher proportion of those with one or more disability (5.3 per cent) progressed to a negative destination than those with no disabilities (3.5 per cent).

'Work' was more likely to be the destination of a college leaver with no disability (20.3 per cent) than it was for a leaver with one or more disability (15.8 per cent).

Table 3.12: Confirmed Destinations by Disability Status, 2015/16

  One or more disability No disability
Number of Qualifiers 7,504 36,679
Further Study 77.2% 75.0%
Work 15.8% 20.3%
Other destination 1.7% 1.1%
Negative Destination 5.3% 3.5%

Source: SFC (2017),' College Leaver Destinations 2015/16 '
*Total percentages may differ from component percentages as a result of rounding to one decimal place.

What do we know about the destination of college leavers with caring responsibilities?

The SFC College Leaver Destinations publication for 2015/16 notes that students with caring responsibilities accounted for 4.0 per cent of the total college leaver population – 2,034 of a total leaver cohort of 50,682. [16]

The SFC go on to say that of those with confirmed destinations, carers reached positive destinations 93.6 per cent of the time. College leavers that are carers were more likely to progress to further study and less likely to move into employment than those with no caring responsibilities. 78.4 per cent of leavers with caring responsibilities continued to further study and 15.2 per cent with caring responsibilities moved onto employment.

What do we know about the destinations of college leavers that are from a Black and Minority Ethnic ( BME) background?

Those from a Black and Minority Ethnic background ( BME) made up 6.0 per cent of the 2015/16 full-time qualifying cohort – 3,065 college leavers. [17]

The SFC state that of those individuals with a BME background and confirmed destination 79.7 per cent to further study which is 4.3 percentage points higher than the progression to further study for those not from a BME background. A lower proportion of the BME cohort progressed to work (15.1 per cent) than those not from a BME background (19.6 per cent).

What are the completion/drop-out rates for FE courses?

Table 3.13 provides a breakdown of outcomes for student enrolments on recognised FE qualifications. The statistics show that those studying part-time qualifications were more likely to successfully complete (74.3 per cent), or complete their qualification with partial success (16.4 per cent), than those studying for full-time qualifications – completion rate of 65.5 per cent and partial success completion rate of 9.0 per cent.

Table 3.13: Breakdown of outcome for student enrolments on a recognised qualification 2015/16

Full Time Part Time
Number % Number %
Enrolments 49,955 99,720
Completed Successful 32,730 65.5% 74,120 74.3%
Completed Partial Success 4,485 9.0% 16,380 16.4%
Further withdrawal 8,260 16.5% 6,115 6.1%
Early withdrawal 4,475 9.0% 3,105 3.1%

Source: SFC (2017), ' College Performance Indicators 2015/16 '
Figures have been rounded to the nearest 5. Percentages calculated on unrounded figures.

Table 3.14 provides a further breakdown of outcomes for student enrolments by subject of study. Students enrolled in Nautical Studies were most likely to complete with 88.8 per cent of the 2015/16 enrolments doing so successfully and 6.2 per cent completing with partial success.

Withdrawals were highest for those studying Hairdressing, Beauty and Complementary Therapies in which 18.2 per cent of enrolments resulted in 'further withdrawal' and 9.4 per cent resulted in 'early withdrawal'. A combined withdrawal rate of 27.6 per cent. Other subjects which had a combined withdrawal rate (further withdrawal + early withdrawal) of more than 25 per cent were Social Subjects, Science, and Sport and Leisure.

Table 3.14: Outcomes for student enrolments by Education Scotland subject groupings on FE courses lasting 160 hours or more, 2015/16

Education Scotland Subject Number of Students % Completed Successfully % Completed with Partial Success % Further Withdrawal % Early Withdrawal
Nautical studies 500 88.8 6.2 - -
Languages & ESOL 7,025 77.7 6.8 9.4 6.1
Engineering 13,035 75.8 8.8 10.0 5.4
Land-based industries 2,945 74.6 12.0 8.5 4.9
Construction 9,405 73.0 9.7 11.2 6.1
Special Programmes 6,280 72.4 10.5 11.6 5.5
Computing & ICT 4,085 67.7 13.5 12.0 6.8
Performing arts 1,325 67.3 8.4 16.7 7.6
Art & design 3,115 66.6 9.6 15.9 7.9
Hospitality & tourism 5,220 65.9 9.2 16.2 8.6
Education & training 2,915 64.7 12.7 15.6 7.0
Hairdressing, Beauty and Complementary Therapies 8,320 63.8 8.5 18.2 9.4
Sport & Leisure 3,365 63.2 10.6 17.5 8.7
Business, management & administration 5,040 62.5 19.9 10.7 6.9
Media 1,510 62.1 16.0 12.7 9.2
Care 14,150 59.2 20.7 14.0 6.1
Science 3,805 53.8 21.2 15.0 10.1
Social subjects 4,315 53.7 20.6 16.2 9.5

Source: SFC supplementary data to the on College Leavers Destinations 2015/16 publication
Figures have been rounded to the nearest 5. Percentages calculated on unrounded figures.

Table 3.15 shows an alternative breakdown by age group. It shows that those aged 25 and over were most likely to successfully complete their course (70.1 per cent completed successfully) and those aged under 16 least likely to successfully complete (63.5 per cent successful completion rate). If we look at combined completion ("completed successfully" and "completed with partial success") we also find that those aged 25 and over are most likely to complete and students aged 16-19 are least likely to complete.

In terms of withdrawals, those aged 16-19 are more likely than any other age group to be "further withdrawals" and also most likely to withdraw in general (further withdrawals + early withdrawals). Those aged 20-24 were most likely to be "early withdrawals" (7.8 per cent).

Table 3.15: Outcomes for student enrolments by age group on FE courses lasting 160 hours or more, 2015/16

Age Number of Students % Completed Successfully % Completed with Partial Success % Further Withdrawal % Early Withdrawal
Under 16 4,605 63.5 17.5 12.6 6.4
16-19 46,560 65.2 12.7 15.2 6.9
20-24 17,530 68.5 11.2 12.5 7.8
25 and over 27,650 70.1 13.3 9.9 6.6

Source: SFC supplementary data to the on College Leavers Destinations 2015/16 publication
Figures have been rounded to the nearest 5. Percentages calculated on unrounded figures.

Table 3.16 considers outcomes by gender. Males were more likely to successfully complete their course than females yet females were more likely to complete with partial success than males.

Table 3.16: Outcomes for student enrolments by gender on FE courses lasting 160 hours or more, 2015/16

Gender Number of Students % Completed Successfully % Completed with Partial Success % Further Withdrawal % Early Withdrawal
Male 47,315 69.5 12.0 12.2 6.4
Female 48,975 64.9 13.6 13.9 7.5
Other 55 63.0 13.0 11.1 13.0

Source: SFC supplementary data to the on College Leavers Destinations 2015/16 publication
Figures have been rounded to the nearest 5. Percentages calculated on unrounded figures.

Table 3.17 considers outcomes by SIMD10 status. The majority of student enrolments were not from SIMD10. It shows that those from SIMD10 were less likely to successfully or partially complete than those not from SIMD10. Those from SIMD10 were also more likely to be early or further withdrawals.

Table 3.17: Outcomes for student enrolments from 10% most deprived data zones on FE courses lasting 160 hours or more, 2015/16

SIMD10 Status Number of Students % Completed Successfully % Completed with Partial Success % Further Withdrawal % Early Withdrawal
Not from SIMD10 79,200 67.7 13.0 12.8 6.6
From SIMD10 17,145 64.8 12.2 14.3 8.7

Source: SFC supplementary data to the on College Leavers Destinations 2015/16 publication
Figures have been rounded to the nearest 5. Percentages calculated on unrounded figures.

To what extent do individuals undertaking FE courses repeat the same level of study?

The SFC College Leaver Destinations ( CLD) publication [18] notes that ideally progression upwards in SCQF should be evident as students move from one course to another, however it is not as clean cut as this as some students require learning at a similar level for a different skill.

College Leavers Progression ( HE and FE)

The SFC statistics in Table 3.18 show that , 33,141 qualifiers in 2015/16 went onto further study. Of these, 84.9 per cent (28,121) moved up one or more SCQF level, 11.3 per cent (3,760) remained at the same level while 3.8 per cent (1,260) moved down or remained at the same level. SFC note that examination of those moving sideways - i.e. remaining at the same level - indicates complementing skills with comparable levelled skills, for example plumbing at SCQF level 5 moving to Gas Plumbing and Installation at SCQF level 5; others indicate changes in direction of study. Those dropping in SCQF level often demonstrate refinement and supplementing of a higher-level course e.g. HND Mechanical Engineering to HNC Aircraft demonstrates the planned industry the student wishes to pursue.

Table 3.18: SCQF Progression of 2015/16 Full-Time Qualifiers Entering Further Study

Qualifying Course SCQF Level Destination SCQF Level
Lower Unchanged Higher Total
Number Proportion Number Proportion Number Proportion
1 0 0.0% 20 33.9% 39 66.1% 59
2 8 1.9% 175 42.0% 234 56.1% 417
3 40 4.7% 179 21.2% 624 74.0% 843
4 78 2.1% 597 15.7% 3,129 82.3% 3,804
5 355 4.0% 1,312 14.9% 7,167 81.1% 8,834
6 403 4.5% 875 9.8% 7,644 85.7% 8,922
7 153 2.7% 328 5.9% 5,107 91.4% 5,588
8 185 4.1% 245 5.5% 4,040 90.4% 4,470
9 7 4.3% 17 10.6% 137 85.1% 161
10 31 72.1% 12 27.9% 0 0.0% 43
All 1,260 3.8% 3,760 11.3% 28,121 84.9% 33,141

Source: SFC (2017),' College Leaver Destinations 2015/16 '
Notes: Where a programme is not formally SCQF credit rated a 'broadly comparable' level can be assigned. This has been done by either comparing across to SCQF from other national frameworks if the programme has a level on another framework or if this is not the case, using the SCQF Level Descriptors to identify the most appropriate level of learning for the programme of study.

College Leavers Progression ( HE and FE) by individual age

The CLD publications do not provide a breakdown of the SCQF level progression by individual age. This information has been obtained separately from SFC and is presented in Table 3.19 below. Please note that Table 3.19 is based on the 2014/15 CLD publication rather than the 2015/16 one and additionally the statistics should be treated as experimental.

These statistics show that younger college leavers ( i.e. those aged 15-19) are more likely to progress at lower or unchanged SCQF levels than older leavers ( i.e. those aged 20-24). Of those progressing to further study, those aged 15 are more likely to progress to lower or unchanged level study than any other age. With 30 per cent of 15 year olds progressed their studies at lower or unchanged levels compared to 17 per cent across the whole 15-24 cohort.

A similar story is told when considering the progression of leavers to higher SCQF levels. Those aged 15-19 are less likely to progress their studies at higher SCQF levels than those aged 20-24. Progression to higher levels is lowest for those aged 15 and 16 – with 70 per cent of 15 year olds progressing to higher levels and 75 per cent of 16 year olds. This compares to an average higher level progression rate across the whole 15-24 group of 82 per cent.

Table 3.19: Proportion of 2014/15 Full-time Qualifiers Entering Further Study by Individual Age and SCQF Movement (for Confirmed Destination Course SCQF Levels)

Age Lower Unchanged Higher
15 8% 22% 70%
16 5% 20% 75%
17 5% 13% 82%
18 4% 11% 84%
19 5% 20% 75%
20 4% 11% 86%
21 4% 8% 87%
22 3% 10% 87%
23 3% 8% 89%
24 3% 11% 86%
Total 4% 13% 82%

Source: SFC supplementary data to the College Leavers Destination 2014/15 publication


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