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Publication - Publication

National Planning Framework for Scotland 2

Published: 2 Jul 2009
Part of:
Building, planning and design
ISBN:
9780755980239

Long term spatial strategy for Scotland's development.

146 page PDF

5.5MB

146 page PDF

5.5MB

Contents
National Planning Framework for Scotland 2
ANNEX: NATIONAL DEVELOPMENTS - STATEMENTS OF NEED

146 page PDF

5.5MB

ANNEX: NATIONAL DEVELOPMENTS - STATEMENTS OF NEED

The legislation requires that if the National Planning Framework designates a development as a national development it must contain a statement by Scottish Ministers of their reasons for considering that there is a need for that development. The Framework may also contain statements as regards other matters pertaining to any designation of a national development.

The developments which Ministers propose to designate as national developments are considered to be essential to the delivery of the spatial strategy set out in the second National Planning Framework. They will contribute to the Government's objective of building a Scotland that is wealthier and fairer; greener; safer and stronger; smarter and healthier.

The environmental effects of the 9 developments initially proposed as national developments were set out in the Environmental Report which accompanied the Discussion Draft of the NPF. The environmental effects of the additional national developments, whether proposed by consultees in their responses to the Discussion Draft or recommended by the Scottish Parliament in its response to the proposed NPF, were detailed in a Supplementary Environmental Report on which the Government consulted in October. An assessment has also been made of potential effects on sites designated under the EC Wild Birds and Habitats Directives. While these strategic level assessments provide an overview of the environmental performance of the NPF as a whole, they do not remove the requirement for further, more detailed environmental impact assessment at plan or project levels. Any measures required to avoid, minimise, mitigate or compensate for adverse effects on Natura 2000 sites are identified in the NPF Action Programme. When national developments are incorporated into strategic or local development plans, their environmental effects may need to be addressed in greater detail in associated strategic environmental assessments. Project level appropriate assessments should include an assessment of the potential effects of national developments in combination, regardless of what stage they are in the planning process.

Developments designated as national developments will still require to secure planning permission and other relevant consents, but Ministers may intervene at any stage of the process to ensure that decisions are made expeditiously. Designation in the National Planning Framework is the mechanism for establishing the need for these developments and statements of need will be material considerations in the determination of planning applications. Any subsequent examination of the detailed planning implications, whether by a session of a public inquiry or a hearing, will therefore be concerned with matters such as siting, design and the mitigation of environmental impacts, not the principle of the development.

The Action Programme for the second NPF2 identifies the actions needed to deliver the strategy, how these contribute to the realisation of the strategy, key milestones in taking them forward, the bodies responsible for delivery, and lead partners. The Monitoring Report for the second National Planning Framework will report on progress in delivering national developments.

1. Replacement Forth Crossing

Description of development

Replacement crossing for the existing Forth Road Bridge.

Location

The crossing will be sited west of the existing bridge.

Elements covered by the designation

  • the principle of a new four-lane road crossing with hard shoulders;
  • the provision of a multi-modal transport corridor between Edinburgh and Fife;
  • associated environmental works.

Need for the development

The Forth Road Bridge has been an essential part of the national road infrastructure for over 40 years. It is vital to the economy of Fife, an essential link for the East Coast Corridor and crucial to the connectivity of Perth and the Highlands and Islands. The main suspension cables of the bridge are showing significant signs of deterioration as a result of corrosion. While a programme of works has been identified to dry out the cables and thus prolong the life of the bridge, there is a considerable risk that this work will not be successful. If that proves to be the case, restrictions to heavy goods vehicles may be needed. Complete loss of the road crossing would have very significant adverse economic impacts, both nationally and regionally.

The development offers the opportunity to increase public transport capacity by providing a multi-modal corridor between Edinburgh and Fife.

Matters to be addressed when consent is sought include:

Design, alignment, visual and noise impacts; construction methods; effects on communities; measures to minimise traffic impacts; carbon impact; effects on the natural environment, including the Firth of Forth Special Protection Area ( SPA), the Forth Islands SPA, the Firth of Forth Ramsar Site, the River Teith Special Area of Conservation ( SAC) and St. Margaret's Marsh Site of Special Scientific Interest ( SSSI); effects on the historic environment and cultural heritage; and any measures necessary to minimise, mitigate or compensate for adverse effects on the environment or communities.

The development requires an environmental impact assessment. The crossing has been subject to strategic environmental assessment and appropriate assessment under the Habitats Directive. Further consideration of potential effects in combination with developments at Rosyth and Grangemouth will be required as these projects are developed. Any measures necessary to compensate for effects on the Firth of Forth SPA should be co-ordinated strategically over the area of the SPA.

wealthier and fairer

v

contributes to sustainable economic development

v

greener

strengthens global links

safer and stronger

v

improves internal connectivity

v

smarter

helps meet climate change, renewable energy or waste management targets

healthier

essential element of a national infrastructure programme

v

more than regional importance

v

2. West of Scotland Strategic Rail Enhancements

Description of development

New and upgraded infrastructure to improve national rail capacity in the West of Scotland.

Locations

Glasgow, Renfrewshire, Inverclyde and Ayrshire.

Elements covered by the designation

  • measures to increase terminal capacity in Glasgow;
  • new and upgraded rail infrastructure in Glasgow and the Clyde Valley and Ayrshire.

Need for the development

The development will address significant capacity constraints and deficiencies on the rail network, delivering substantial improvements in national rail capacity and connectivity and reductions in rail journey times. It will provide platform and track capacity to accommodate an increase in service frequency to Ayr, Inverclyde and Kilmarnock; accommodate the Edinburgh to Glasgow Improvements Programme; improve rail connectivity through and across Glasgow; and ensure adequate capacity to accommodate freight traffic. It will help to reduce reliance on road-based transport and the private car. More particularly, it will improve access to Glasgow, Prestwick and Edinburgh Airports by public transport and offer potential for connecting rail services between them.

Matters to be addressed when consent is sought include:

Siting, design, layout and alignment of new buildings and infrastructure, visual and noise impacts; construction methods; effects on communities; carbon impact; the potential for future integration with a high-speed rail network; effects on the historic environment and cultural heritage; effects on the natural environment; and any measures necessary to minimise, mitigate or compensate for adverse effects on the environment or communities. Development proposals will require environmental impact assessment, economic appraisal and transport assessment.

wealthier and fairer

v

contributes to sustainable economic development

v

greener

v

strengthens global links

safer and stronger

v

improves internal connectivity

v

smarter

v

helps meet climate change, renewable energy or waste management targets

v

healthier

essential element of a national infrastructure programme

v

more than regional importance

v

3. High-Speed Rail Link to London

Description of development

High-speed rail lines linking Edinburgh and Glasgow city centres with London and offering good connections to the rest of the rail network.

Location

Within Scotland the lines will run between the Central Belt and the English border.

Need for development

The Scottish Government is strongly committed to promoting a shift to more sustainable modes of transport. There is compelling evidence that high speed rail services not only offer lower per passenger carbon emissions than aviation, but that with their shorter journey times can achieve a real shift from air to rail travel. A high speed rail link offering journey times between Central Scotland and London of less than 3 hours will help to make the train a more attractive option than short-haul flights for journeys within Britain and create the potential for direct high speed rail services to the Continent.

Matters to be addressed when consent is sought include:

Routing, alignment and design of new infrastructure; connections to the rest of the rail network; visual and noise impacts; construction methods; effects on communities; carbon impact; effects on the historic environment and cultural heritage; effects on the natural environment; and any measures necessary to minimise, mitigate or compensate for adverse effects on the environment or communities. Development proposals will require environmental assessment, environmental impact assessment, economic appraisal and transport assessment. Any potential effects on Natura 2000 sites will require appropriate assessment under the Habitats Directive.

wealthier and fairer

v

contributes to sustainable economic development

v

greener

v

strengthens global links

v

safer and stronger

v

improves internal connectivity

v

smarter

v

helps meet climate change, renewable energy or waste management targets

v

healthier

v

essential element of a national infrastructure programme

v

more than regional importance

v

4. Strategic Airport Enhancements

Description of development

Improvements in surface transport access and the enhancement of other infrastructure and facilities at Edinburgh, Glasgow, Prestwick and Aberdeen airports.

Locations

Edinburgh Airport at Turnhouse, including land north and south of the A8.

Glasgow Airport at Abbotsinch and land between Paisley St. James Station and the airport.

Prestwick Airport in Ayrshire.

Aberdeen Airport at Dyce.

Elements covered by the designation

Edinburgh Airport: A new surface rail link, including a new airport station at Gogar and the construction of the Dalmeny chord; other access improvements emerging from being taken work associated with the West Edinburgh Planning Framework; improvements to airport terminal facilities and changes in operational area; new and reconfigured taxiways, additional aircraft stands and maintenance hangars; relocation of the Royal Highland Showground; the creation of an International Business Gateway; and resolution of Gogar Burn flooding issues.

Glasgow Airport: The Glasgow Airport Rail Link ( GARL); improvements to terminal facilities and changes in operational area; additional maintenance hangars, and aircraft stands and taxiways.

Prestwick Airport: Improvements to rail and bus interchange arrangements; improvements to terminal facilities and changes in operational area; additional freight and aircraft maintenance facilities; additional aircraft stands and taxiways; and new parking provision.

Aberdeen Airport: Improvements in access by public transport; improvements to terminal facilities; and new parking arrangements.

Need for development

Scotland's airports are essential elements of national infrastructure. Given Scotland's geographical position, good air links are vital for international connectivity and competitiveness.

Edinburgh Airport is of key economic importance as an international gateway, helping to make Scotland an attractive location for business and tourism and providing access to global markets. Improved public transport access will provide more sustainable means of accessing the airport and associated facilities and help to accommodate projected passenger traffic volumes. The creation of an International Business Gateway immediately to the south of the airport will help to realise the unique attributes of this location, providing high quality international business accommodation and helping to build investor confidence in West Edinburgh as a strategic location of national importance.

Glasgow Airport is of key economic importance as an international gateway, helping to make Scotland an attractive location for business and tourism and providing access to global markets. The Glasgow Airport Rail Link will significantly improve access to the airport by public transport. Enhancement of the airport can also assist the regeneration of the North of Paisley and Paisley town centre.

Prestwick Airport was recognised by the Aviation White Paper as the West of Scotland's "second runway" and is an important economic driver for Ayrshire and the South West. The expansion of the services offered by airlines operating out of Prestwick has contributed significantly to the improvement in Scotland's international connectivity. Prestwick Airport has a lead role in air freight and is an important centre for air traffic control and the repair and maintenance of aircraft. Improvements in the capacity of surface transport infrastructure will be needed to accommodate projected passenger traffic volumes. Improved connectivity through Glasgow would significantly improve the accessibility of the airport by rail.

Aberdeen Airport offers international and domestic services vital to the North-East economy and the future of the region as an energy hub. It is Europe's busiest commercial heliport, serving offshore installations. Improvements in access by public transport and airport facilities are needed to accommodate projected passenger and freight traffic volumes.

Matters to be addressed when consent is sought include:

Edinburgh Airport: the alignment and design of improved surface access arrangements; the design, siting and layout of improved airport facilities; parking provision; carbon impact; assessment of effects on Natura 2000 sites as necessary; effects on biodiversity and soils; effects on landscape character and cultural heritage; noise impacts; the technical details and environmental effects of measures to reduce the risk of flooding; and any measures necessary to minimise, mitigate or compensate for adverse effects on the environment or communities. Environmental impact assessment is required. The design, layout and landscaping of new developments and infrastructure will require to conform to a Strategic Design Framework prepared by the City of Edinburgh Council.

Glasgow Airport: the design, siting and layout of improved airport facilities; the alignment and design of any further improvements in surface access; parking provision; carbon impact; effects on the Black Cart SPA and whooper swans; other effects on biodiversity and soils; effects on landscape character and cultural heritage; noise impacts; and any measures necessary to minimise, mitigate or compensate for adverse effects on the environment or communities. Environmental impact assessment and appropriate assessment under the Habitats Directive are required.

Prestwick Airport: the alignment and design of rail and road access arrangements; the design, siting and layout of improved airport facilities; parking provision; carbon impact; landscape and visual impacts; effects on natural heritage, biodiversity and soils; effects on landscape and cultural heritage; noise impacts; and any measures necessary to minimise, mitigate or compensate for adverse effects on the environment or communities. Environmental impact assessment, economic appraisal and transport assessment are required.

Aberdeen Airport: the alignment and design of rail and road access arrangements; the design, siting and layout of improved airport facilities; provision for improved access by public transport; the alignment and design of any necessary improvements in the local road network; parking provision; the alignment and design of rail and road access arrangements; carbon impact; landscape and visual impacts; effects on natural heritage, biodiversity and soils; effects on landscape and cultural heritage; noise impacts; and any measures necessary to minimise, mitigate or compensate for adverse effects on the environment or communities. Environmental impact assessment, economic appraisal and transport assessment are required.

wealthier and fairer

v

contributes to sustainable economic development

v

greener

strengthens global links

v

safer and stronger

v

improves internal connectivity

v

smarter

v

helps meet climate change, renewable energy or waste management targets

healthier

essential element of a national infrastructure programme

v

more than regional importance

v

5. Grangemouth Freight Hub

Description of the development

Improvements in port, road and rail infrastructure to support the role of Grangemouth as Scotland's largest container port and main freight distribution centre.

Location

Port of Grangemouth and surrounding area.

Elements covered by the designation

  • creation of a river berth outside the port lock;
  • expanded freight storage and handling facilities and other port related development;
  • improved railhead access within the port and electrification of the rail link through Falkirk Grahamston;
  • better connections to the M9 motorway;
  • a better link to the M8 and the south via an improved A801;
  • improvements to the local road network, including separation of community and dock traffic;
  • any measures necessary to protect the area from coastal flooding.

Need for the development

Grangemouth is Scotland's busiest container port and home to most of Scotland's petrochemical industry. There is potential for Grangemouth's port facilities to deal with substantial increases in freight movements and provision for expansion will help to ensure that future demand for container capacity is adequately met. Improvements in strategic road and rail infrastructure are needed to support existing operations and to allow the area to function to its full potential as an intermodal freight hub. It is also strategically important that the location is adequately protected from flooding.

It is estimated that improved rail facilities could reduce by half the projected 10% annual growth in lorry movements around the port. Moving more freight by rail can help to improve the reliability of logistics chains by reducing the risk of delays caused by road congestion.

Matters to be addressed when consent is sought include:

Siting and design of developments within the port area; landside road and rail access improvements and their impacts; carbon impact; community impacts and opportunities to improve access by walking, cycling and public transport; any measures necessary to protect against coastal flooding; any potential effects on natural heritage and biodiversity, including the Firth of Forth SPA; and any measures necessary to minimise, mitigate or compensate for adverse effects on the environment or communities.

Development proposals will require environmental impact assessment. As part of appropriate assessment under the Habitats Directive, consideration of potential effects in combination with the Replacement Forth Crossing and development at Rosyth will be required as the projects are developed. Any measures necessary to compensate for effects on the Firth of Forth SPA should be co-ordinated strategically over the area of the SPA.

wealthier and fairer

v

contributes to sustainable economic development

v

greener

strengthens global links

v

safer and stronger

v

improves internal connectivity

v

smarter

helps meet climate change, renewable energy or waste management targets

healthier

essential element of a national infrastructure programme

v

more than regional importance

v

6. Additional Container Freight Capacity on the Forth

Description of development

Multimodal container terminal facilities, including improvements in supporting port, road and rail infrastructure.

Location

Rosyth, and potentially other existing port locations on the Forth.

Elements covered by the designation

  • provision of multimodal container terminal facilities with deep water access;
  • landward road and rail access provision; and
  • any associated environmental works.

Need for the development

Volumes of containerised freight traffic have been growing and are expected to continue to grow in the long term. The creation of additional container freight capacity at ports on the Forth will help to ensure that future demand is adequately met. Rosyth is one location where it is possible to provide deep water berthing which is accessible 24 hours a day and landward access can be provided by road and rail. It offers an opportunity to create a new logistics and distribution hub in the East of Scotland, and contribute to the achievement of climate change targets by encouraging more containerised freight to be moved to and from Scotland by sea.

Matters to be addressed when consent is sought include:

Design of facilities and road and rail access arrangements; carbon impact; effects on natural heritage and biodiversity, including the Firth of Forth SPA; any dredging required to maintain deep water channels and the disposal of dredged material; any measures necessary to minimise, mitigate or compensate for adverse effects on the environment or communities; and any Ministry of Defence interest.

Development proposals will require environmental impact assessment. As part of appropriate assessment under the Habitats Directive, consideration of potential effects in combination with the Replacement Forth Crossing and development at Grangemouth will be required as the projects are developed. Environmental and appropriate assessment at the strategic level will be required for any developments which have not been subject to such assessment as part of the NPF preparation process. Any measures necessary to compensate for effects on the Firth of Forth SPA should be co-ordinated strategically over the area of the SPA.

wealthier and fairer

v

contributes to sustainable economic development

v

greener

strengthens global links

v

safer and stronger

improves internal connectivity

v

smarter

helps meet climate change, renewable energy or waste management targets

healthier

essential element of a national infrastructure programme

more than regional importance

v

7. Port Developments on Loch Ryan

Description of development

Port developments on Loch Ryan and improvements to road and rail infrastructure to support the Loch Ryan ferry ports as Scotland's main roll-on/roll-off gateway from Ireland.

Location

Old House Point and Cairnryan ferry ports on Loch Ryan, Galloway.

Elements covered by the designation

  • new passenger and freight transport facilities on Loch Ryan;
  • improvements to the road network (including the A77 and A75 trunk routes) to improve access to the Loch Ryan ports.

Need for the development

The developments are necessary improvements to an essential element of national infrastructure. Current port facilities impose restrictions on the size of vessels which can operate out of Loch Ryan. The developments will provide additional port capacity and allow the introduction of larger vessels. They will provide a modern international gateway between Scotland and Ireland, contributing to the realisation of Scotland's potential as a land bridge between Ireland and continental Europe. They will deliver increased freight capacity, reduced journey times and increased potential for tourism and help to secure the continued competitiveness of the Loch Ryan to Northern Ireland ferry links.

Matters to be addressed when consent is sought include:

The siting, design and layout of port development; landside transport infrastructure improvements; carbon impact; any measures necessary to protect the area from coastal flooding; any potential damage to marine coastal habitats or disturbance of protected species; any measures necessary to minimise, mitigate or compensate for adverse effects on the environment or communities.

Environmental impact assessment and appropriate assessment under the Habitats Directive are required. The latter should address the potential effects of increased transport and visitor activity on nearby Natura 2000 sites and the Galloway coast.

wealthier and fairer

v

contributes to sustainable economic development

v

greener

v

strengthens global links

v

safer and stronger

v

improves internal connectivity

v

smarter

helps meet climate change, renewable energy or waste management targets

healthier

essential element of a national infrastructure programme

v

more than regional importance

v

8. Scapa Flow Container Transhipment Facility

Description of development

International container transhipment facility utilising the sheltered deep water of Scapa Flow.

Location

Scapa Flow, Orkney.

Elements covered by designation

  • land-based development and offshore operations to provide an international container transhipment facility;
  • supporting landside infrastructure;
  • associated environmental works.

Need for the development

The development can play a key role in meeting the demand for accessible deep water transhipment facilities in Scotland and Europe.

The sheltered deep water at Scapa Flow represents a major opportunity to meet the needs of the international shipping industry, offering the potential for Scotland to become a significant global player in container cargo handling and transhipment to the benefit of the national and local economy. The increasing size of container ships combined with capacity constraints at existing ports is giving rise to a need for accessible deep water transhipment facilities. The ability of Scapa Flow to accommodate the largest container ships and its location in relation to major shipping routes mean that it is well placed to provide a break-bulk transhipment facility serving European markets.

Matters to be addressed when consent is sought include:

Siting, design and layout of facilities; carbon impact; potential effects on nearby SPAs, the Loch of Stenness SAC, and a Site of Local Nature Conservation Interest; effects on the historic environment, including protected buildings and structures, wider historical associations and marine archaeology; effects on landscape, seascape and biodiversity; risk of contamination; the yard handling system; and any measures necessary to minimise, mitigate or compensate for adverse effects on the environment or communities.

Environmental impact assessment and appropriate assessment under the Habitats Directive are required.

wealthier and fairer

v

contributes to sustainable economic development

v

greener

strengthens global links

v

safer and stronger

improves internal connectivity

smarter

helps meet climate change, renewable energy or waste management targets

healthier

essential element of a national infrastructure programme

more than regional importance

v

9. New Power Station and Transhipment Hub at Hunterston

Description of development

Clean coal fired power station, container transhipment hub, maritime construction and decommissioning yard, and associated energy and industrial development.

Location

Adjoining the existing bulk handling terminal and marine construction yard at Hunterston, Ayrshire.

Elements covered by the designation

  • coal fired power station and fuel storage yard;
  • biomass/gas fired power station;
  • carbon capture infrastructure;
  • container transhipment hub;
  • maritime construction and decommissioning yard;
  • downstream industrial processes;
  • associated environmental works.

Need for development

There is a need for new baseload electricity generating capacity to replace the power stations programmed for closure over the next 20 years. Land at Hunterston offers the opportunity to develop a clean coal fired power station, a biomass/gas fired power station and associated downstream industrial processes using the existing bulk handling terminal, jetty facilities and grid connection. The increasing size of container ships combined with capacity constraints at existing ports is giving rise to a need for accessible deep water transhipment facilities. There is a demonstrated capacity at Hunterston to accommodate the largest container ships. It is favourably located in relation to world shipping routes and able to offer onward transhipment by sea, rail or road. The site also offers the potential to undertake maritime construction and decommissioning work.

Matters to addressed when consent is sought include:

The siting, design and layout of power generating plant and freight handling and industrial facilities; road and rail access arrangements; grid connections; carbon impact, including provision for carbon capture and storage; ash management; heat utilisation; landscape, seascape and visual impact; effects on cultural and natural heritage, including Portencross Site of Special Scientific Interest ( SSSI); effects on coastal processes; and any measures necessary to minimise, mitigate or compensate for adverse effects on the environment or communities.

Environmental impact assessment, economic appraisal and a transport assessment are required.

wealthier and fairer

v

contributes to sustainable economic development

v

greener

v

strengthens global links

v

safer and stronger

v

improves internal connectivity

smarter

v

helps meet climate change, renewable energy or waste management targets

v

healthier

essential element of a national infrastructure programme

v

more than regional importance

v

10. New Non-Nuclear Baseload Capacity at Other Existing Power Station Sites

Description of development

New non-nuclear baseload electricity generating capacity and associated infrastructure.

Location

Longannet, Cockenzie and Boddam.

Elements covered by designation

  • new and refurbished power and heat generating plant;
  • carbon capture and other associated infrastructure;
  • associated environmental works.

Need for development

There is a need for new baseload electricity generating capacity to replace that provided by the power stations programmed for closure over the next 20 years. Where operators have opted into the Large Combustion Plant Directive, major investment will be needed to ensure that plant can comply with the stricter environmental controls from 2015.

Matters to be addressed when consent is sought include:

The siting, design and layout of power generating plant; road and rail access arrangements; grid connections; carbon impact, including provision for carbon capture and storage; ash management; heat utilisation; landscape, seascape and visual impact; effects on cultural and natural heritage; effects on coastal processes; any flood risk management issues; any measures necessary to minimise, mitigate or compensate for adverse effects on the environment or communities.

Environmental impact assessments, economic appraisals and transport assessments will be required. The potential effects of carbon capture and storage infrastructure on Natura 2000 sites may require appropriate assessment under the Habitats Directive. The potential effects of development at Boddam on the Buchan Ness and Collieston SPA may require to be assessed.

wealthier and fairer

v

contributes to sustainable economic development

v

greener

v

strengthens global links

safer and stronger

v

improves internal connectivity

smarter

v

helps meet climate change, renewable energy or waste management targets

v

healthier

v

essential element of a national infrastructure programme

v

more than regional importance

v

11. Electricity Grid Reinforcements

Description of development

  • Overhead line and substation works to increase north-south transfer capacity in Central Scotland;
  • a new 275kV South-West Scotland transmission line and associated infrastructure;
  • strengthening the Scotland - England interconnectors to increase export capacity to 3.2 GW;
  • upgrading the East Coast transmission route to 400kV;
  • upgrading the existing Beauly - Dounreay overhead transmission line;
  • reinforcement of the Beauly - Keith overhead transmission line;
  • reinforcement of the sub-sea cable link between Orkney and the Scottish mainland;
  • new sub-sea cable links for the Outer Hebrides and the Shetland Islands.

Location

Throughout Scotland, from the English Border to the Shetland Islands.

Elements covered by designation

Overhead transmission lines, underground and sub-sea cable routes and associated converter stations and substations.

Need for development

These strategic grid reinforcements are essential to provide the transmission capacity necessary to realise the potential of Scotland's renewable energy resources, maintain long-term security of electricity supply and support sustainable economic development.

Matters to be addressed when consent is sought include:

The routes of any new overhead lines and underground or sub-sea cables; the locations of sub-sea cable landfalls; the siting and design of any new structures; carbon impact; landscape and visual impacts; effects on bird species, other aspects of biodiversity, soils, hydrology and hydrogeology, the coast and the marine environment; effects on the historic environment; any measures necessary to minimise, mitigate or compensate for adverse effects on the environment or communities.

Environmental impact assessment of individual elements may be required. Some of the marine elements of this programme of reinforcements have been assessed in the Marine Renewables SEA. Any potential effects on Natura 2000 sites require appropriate assessment under the Habitats Directive. These should be considered on a whole scheme basis and strategic level mitigation and compensation measures developed where required.

wealthier and fairer

v

contributes to sustainable economic development

v

greener

v

strengthens global links

v

safer and stronger

v

improves internal connectivity

v

smarter

v

helps meet climate change, renewable energy or waste management targets

v

healthier

v

essential element of a national infrastructure programme

v

more than regional importance

v

12. Central Scotland Green Network

Description

A strategic network of woodland and other habitats, active travel routes, greenspace links, watercourses and waterways, providing an enhanced setting for development and other land uses and improved opportunities for outdoor recreation and cultural activity.

Location

Throughout Central Scotland, from Ayrshire, Inverclyde and Dunbartonshire in the West to Fife and East Lothian in the East.

Elements covered by designation

  • woodland expansion;
  • the creation of a high quality landscape structure which supports development plan settlement strategies;
  • strategic routes for active travel and recreation;
  • strategic habitat networks and habitat development projects;
  • the restoration of vacant and derelict land for green network purposes; and
  • the integration of woodland, habitat, greenspace and access development with water catchment and coastal zone management.

Need for development

Delivering a better environment in Central Scotland will help to ensure that it can compete economically at a European and global scale. The creation of a Central Scotland Green Network will complement improvements in rail, road and communications infrastructure, making Central Scotland a more attractive place to live in, do business and visit. Improving the health and resilience of the natural environment will help it to adapt to climate change. A well-planned increase in woodland cover can substantially improve the landscape settings of our towns and cities, bring vacant and derelict land into beneficial use, improve biodiversity and amenity, and help to absorb CO 2. Improvements can also be made to networks of other habitats, including wetlands, to counter fragmentation and assist species migration. The development of footpath and cycleway networks and other facilities and attractions will contribute to a more sustainable transport network and expand the range of recreational opportunities close to major centres of population, helping to encourage active travel and healthier lifestyles.

Matters to be addressed include:

Location and design of integrated habitat networks; alignment and design of active travel routes and access provision; location, design and layout of any new recreational or cultural facilities; visual and noise impacts; effects on communities; carbon impact; effects on the historic environment and cultural heritage; and effects on the natural environment, including existing habitats and species. Any potential effects on Natura 2000 sites will require appropriate assessment under the Habitats Directive.

wealthier and fairer

v

contributes to sustainable economic development

v

greener

v

strengthens global links

safer and stronger

v

improves internal connectivity

v

smarter

v

helps meet climate change, renewable energy or waste management targets

v

healthier

v

essential element of a national infrastructure programme

v

more than regional importance

v

13. Metropolitan Glasgow Strategic Drainage Scheme

Description of development

Upgrading and replacement of drainage infrastructure, including new water treatment plants, and associated catchment management and flood risk reduction measures.

Location

Glasgow Conurbation.

Elements covered by designation

New and replacement trunk and local sewers; pumping stations; waste water treatment works; catchment management and flood risk reduction measures; and sustainable urban drainage ( SuDS) schemes.

Need for development

Substantial improvements in drainage infrastructure and water catchment management are required to reduce flood risk and support regeneration and economic development in the Glasgow Conurbation, especially on the east side of the city. This demands a strategic approach in which drainage and catchment management measures are co-ordinated with major transport infrastructure projects such as the M74 Extension and East End Regeneration Route; the regeneration of the Clyde Gateway; the development of the 2014 Commonwealth Games facilities at Dalmarnock; and the development of the Glasgow and the Clyde Valley Green Network.

Matters to be addressed include:

Routing and alignment of new and replacement sewers; siting and design of pumping stations and waste water treatment works; design of catchment management measures, flood risk reduction works and use of best practice in sustainable drainage schemes to deliver wider environmental benefits; co-ordination with improvements in transport infrastructure, regeneration activity, integration with the development of Commonwealth Games facilities and the green network; potential effects on bio_diversity and soils; and any measures necessary to minimise, mitigate or compensate for adverse effects on the environment or communities.

Environmental impact assessment will be required.

wealthier and fairer

v

contributes to sustainable economic development

v

greener

v

strengthens global links

v

safer and stronger

v

improves internal connectivity

smarter

helps meet climate change, renewable energy or waste management targets

healthier

v

essential element of a national infrastructure programme

v

more than regional importance

v

14. Commonwealth Games Facilities and Infrastructure

Description of development

Sports facilities, athletes' accommodation and transport and environmental infrastructure directly related to the Games.

Location

Principal developments are in the Clyde Gateway (Dalmarnock), Clyde Waterfront Regeneration Area (new SECC Arena) and at other key locations including Hampden Park and Tollcross Park.

Elements covered by designation

Athletes' village; national indoor sports arena; velodrome; hockey centre; Hampden Park; 50m. pool at Tollcross Park; Scotstoun Stadium and Leisure Centre; Kelvin Hall; supporting transport and environmental infrastructure.

Need for development

Glasgow will host the 2014 Commonwealth Games. While 70% of the venues and infrastructure are in place and 20% are committed, the remaining elements need to be developed on time and according to schedule to ensure that everything is in place to make the 2014 Games an event of which the city and Scotland can be proud.

Delivery of the Games facilities and supporting infrastructure will make an important contribution to the regeneration of the Clyde Gateway. The project offers the opportunity to leave a lasting legacy in the form of improved sports and cultural facilities, transport infrastructure and environmental quality.

Matters to be addressed when consent is sought include:

Siting and design of Games facilities; access arrangements and supporting transport and environmental infrastructure; carbon impact; effects of temporary use or permanent redevelopment of some sites on locally important resources, including townscapes and archaeology, biodiversity, soils and water catchments; noise; and any measures necessary to minimise, mitigate or compensate for adverse effects on the environment or communities.

A strategic environmental assessment of the plans for the Games is being undertaken. Some components way also require environmental impact assessment at the project level.

wealthier and fairer

v

contributes to sustainable economic development

v

greener

v

strengthens global links

safer and stronger

v

improves internal connectivity

smarter

helps meet climate change, renewable energy or waste management targets

healthier

v

essential element of a national infrastructure programme

v

more than regional importance

v


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