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Planning Advice Note 68: Design Statements

Published: 18 Aug 2003
Part of:
Building, planning and design
ISBN:
0-7559-0862-7

Explains what a design statement is, why it is a useful tool, when it is required and how it should be prepared and presented.

26 page PDF

1.9MB

26 page PDF

1.9MB

Contents
Planning Advice Note 68: Design Statements
Page 6

26 page PDF

1.9MB

Planning Advice Note 68: Design Statements

How should a design statement be presented?

Presentation

The applicant should choose the most effective form of presentation, as the contents of a design statement will vary according to the nature of the development and the site's characteristics. For most applications, the design statement need not be elaborate. It can be a short document (one or two pages), which sets out the principles on which the development is based and explains the design solution. Irrespective of the scale of development, the design statement must be supported by good graphics. Suggestions for (1) text and (2) illustrations are set out on the following pages, together with (3) extracts from a case study which shows an example of a design statement.

appraisalprinciples

Residential development in Canongate,Edinburgh
Sketch drawing of entrance toCramond Kirk Hall, Edinburgh
Residential development in Canongate,
Edinburgh
Sketch drawing of entrance to
Cramond Kirk Hall, Edinburgh
applicants should choose the most effective form of presentation

1. Text

The main issues which need to be covered include background information, a brief description of the site's details and its area appraisal, the relevant design principles, any reference to public involvement or programming and an explanation
of why the design solution was chosen.

Background information

Name of the scheme
Applicant
Architect/developer/urban designers/agents/advisors, etc.
Description of client brief (if there is one)
Date

Site details

Location and site plan - scale and north point
Description
History
Ownership

Site and area appraisals

Any specific points relating to:

> Context
> Identity
> Connection

Design principles

National guidance
Local authority development plan design policies
Supplementary planning guidance
Site specific development briefs
Design guides

Public involvement

Outcome of consultation and public involvement

Programme

How will the project be phased?

Design solution

Explanation of the proposed development with respect to:

> Layout, i.e. context
streets and spaces
accessibility
safety and security
sustainability
energy efficiency
> Landscape
> Scale and mix
> Details and materials
> Maintenance


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