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Publication - Research Publication

Public attitudes to young people in Scotland

Published: 17 Nov 2017

Findings from a survey of public attitudes to young people.

19 page PDF

471.7kB

19 page PDF

471.7kB

Contents
Public attitudes to young people in Scotland
Annex B – The socio-demographic characteristics of people with negative attitudes

19 page PDF

471.7kB

Annex B – The socio-demographic characteristics of people with negative attitudes

Q1: Young people are trustworthy

  • 59% of those who disagreed that young people are trustworthy were male, compared to 47% of those agreeing.
  • 46% of those who disagreed that young people are trustworthy were aged 25-49, compared to 33% among those who agreed.
  • 61% of those who disagreed that young people are trustworthy were in the C2DE occupational group, compared to 40% among those who agreed.
  • 22% of those who disagreed that young people are trustworthy were inactive or unemployed, compared to 13% among those who agreed.
  • 39% of those who disagreed that young people are trustworthy were never married, compared to 30% among those who agreed.

Q2: Young people are lazy

  • 49% of those who agreed that young people are lazy were aged 25-49, compared to 32% among those who disagreed.
  • 41% of those who agreed that young people are lazy were working full time, compared to 31% among those who disagreed.
  • 59% of those who agreed that young people are lazy were married, in a civil partnership or living as married, compared to 49% among those who disagreed.

Q3: Young people take responsibility for their own actions

  • 52% of those who disagreed that young people take responsibility for their own actions were in the C2DE occupational group, compared to 43% among those who agreed.

Q4: Young people lack communication skills

  • 52% of those who agreed that young people lack communication skills were male, compared to 45% of those agreeing.
  • 43% of those who agreed that young people lack communication skills were aged 25-49, compared to 34% of those agreeing.
  • 53% of those who agreed that young people lack communication skills were in the C2DE occupational group, compared to 40% of those agreeing.
  • 21% of those who agreed that young people lack communication skills were inactive or unemployed, compared to 11% of those agreeing.

Q5: Young people help others in need

  • 64% of those who disagreed that young people help others in need were male, compared to 43% of those agreeing.
  • 50% of those who disagreed that young people help others in need were aged 25-49, compared to 34% of those agreeing.
  • 36% of those who disagreed that young people help others in need had household incomes under £20K, compared to 27% of those agreeing.
  • 58% of those who disagreed that young people help others in need were in the C2DE occupational group, compared to 41% of those agreeing.
  • 24% of those who disagreed that young people help others in need were economically inactive or unemployed, compared to 12% of those agreeing.

Q6: Young people cause trouble in their local area

  • 57% of those who agreed that young people cause trouble in their local area were male, compared to 46% of those agreeing.
  • 34% of those who agreed that young people cause trouble in their local area were aged 25-49, compared to 34% of those agreeing.
  • 61% of those who agreed that young people cause trouble in their local area were in the C2DE occupational group, compared to 42% of those agreeing.
  • 23% of those who agreed that young people cause trouble in their local area were economically inactive or unemployed, compared to 13% of those agreeing.
  • 59% of those who agreed that young people cause trouble in their local area were married, in a civil partnership or living as married, compared to 49% of those agreeing.

Q7: The behaviour of young people today is no worse than it was 30 years ago

  • 51% of those who disagreed that the behaviour of young people today is no worse than it was 30 years ago were in the C2DE occupational group, compared to 42% of those agreeing.

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