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Publication - Minutes

Rape and sexual assault victims services taskforce minutes: November 2017

Published: 12 Feb 2018
Date of meeting: 7 Nov 2017
Date of next meeting: 7 Feb 2018
Location: Victoria Quay, Edinburgh

Meeting of the task force for the Improvement of Services for Victims of Rape and Sexual Assault.

Attendees and apologies

Taskforce members present

  • Dr Catherine Calderwood – Chief Medical Officer for Scotland, Scottish Government (Chair)
  • Dr Mini Mishra – Senior Medical Officer, SG
  • Pauline McGough – Clinical Director and Consultant in Sexual and Reproductive Health, Sandyford Clinic
  • Louise Raphael – Her Majesty’s Inspectorate Constabulary in Scotland
  • Derek Scrimger – Scottish Police Authority (for Tom Nelson – Director of Forensic Services)
  • Karen Ritchie – Deputy Director of Evidence, Healthcare Improvement Scotland (HIS)
  • Dr Hilary Ansell – Lead Forensic Physician, SEAT Healthcare and Forensic Medical Services
  • Anne Marie Hicks – Head of Victims and Witnesses policy, COPFS
  • Fiona Murphy - Director of National Services Division (NSD), NHS National Service Scotland (NSS) & Network Board Representative
  • Sandy Brindley – National Co-Ordinator, Rape Crisis Scotland
  • Iona Colvin - Chief Social Work Adviser to SG
  • Tansy Main – Rape and Sexual Assault Taskforce Lead, SG

On tele/video-conference

  • Dr Louise Wilson, Representing Directors of Public Health, NHS Orkney
  • Dr Ronald MacVicar - Postgraduate Dean, North of Scotland Region of NHS Education for Scotland (NES)
  • Elaine Mead - Chief Executive, NHS Highland

In attendance

  • Louise Raphael – Associate Inspector, HMICS
  • Diane Dempster – CMO business unit and Taskforce Secretariat
  • Yousaf Kanan – Scottish Government, Social Researcher

Items and actions

Welcome and apologies

1. Dr Catherine Calderwood (CC) welcomed everyone to the meeting and invited introductions. Apologies were noted from the following:

  • Saira Kapasi – Violence Against Women and Girls Justice Lead, SG
  • Gill Imery, Assistant Inspector of Constabulary (HMICS)
  • Professor Elizabeth Ireland – Chair NHS National Services Scotland – representing NHS Chairs Group
  • Dr Boyd Peters – Assistant Medical Director, NHS Highland (representing the Scottish Association of Medical Directors (SAMD))
  • Anne Neilson – Director of Public Protection, NHS Lothian
  • Philippa Brosnan, Child Protection Team Leader, SG
  • John Wood, CoSLA
  • Tom Nelson - Director of Forensic Services, Scottish Police Authority
  • Katie Cosgrove – Gender Based Violence Programme Lead, NHS Health Scotland
  • Professor Lindsay Thomson – Medical Director of the State Hospitals Board for Scotland, representing Scottish Association of Medical Directors
  • Dr Kate McKay – Senior Medical Officer, SG
  • DCS Lesley Boal – Head of Public Protection, Police Scotland
  • Dr Charlotte Kirk – Consultant Paediatrician, NHS Lothian

Minutes

2. The minutes of the meeting on 7 September 2017 were agreed as a true record.

Action log

3. The action log was reviewed.

  • 001 – Biographies –15 have been received so far. CMO noted that this information is helpful because the minutes of each meeting are made public. Action remains open.
  • 009 – National data landscape – to be covered under item 5 (sub-group updates)
  • 010 – Crown Office look-back exercise – to be covered under item 6 (COPFS paper)
  • 012 – Facilitated workshop – to be covered under item 8 (next steps)
  • 015 – Note of Health and Justice Collaboration Board on 7 September attached for noting. Action closed.
  • 016 – Workforce sub group to consider learning from NHS Lothian Ts and Cs – to be covered under item 5 (sub group updates)
  • 017 – Dr Kate McKay to discuss paediatric recording with Kate MacKenzie – Remains open.
  • 018 – Elizabeth Ireland to circulate Grampian report to CMO and sub group chairs. Action closed.
  • 019 - CMO to discuss the Network Chair vacancy with the Chair of the NHS CEs. Post now filled by Mr James Crichton (chair of the State hospital). Action closed.
  • 020 – Rape Crisis feedback from Police Scotland. Circulated for noting. Action closed.
  • 021 – Research brief to be circulated for noting. Action closed.
  • 022 – COPFS to take forward issue of agreeing expert advice in advance - to be covered under item 6 (COPFS update).
  • 023 – Sub group chairs to provide comments to Tansy on high level work plan. The CMO thanked members for their contribution to this milestone and reiterated that progress is being watched by Ministers, Parliament and the public and that we need to be mindful of timescales. Action closed.
  • 024 – Paper on Barnahus. The CMO advised that Barnahus cuts across the policy areas of health, child protection and justice and that discussions are on-going about how this will be progressed (in parallel to the Taskforce). The CMO noted that paediatric considerations are covered by all of the sub groups. Action will remain open.

Matters Arising

Terms of Reference

4. CC advised that a Terms of Reference had been drafted to capture the remit and scope of the Taskforce in one place. This will be circulated by email for comments and signed off by correspondence. It will be reviewed again early in the new year.

AP: DD to circulate the draft Terms of Reference for comments.

Administrative support

5. CC advised that Laura McDonnell from NSD previously provided administrative support to the sub groups but that she has now moved post. She noted her thanks to Laura and advised that Diane Dempster (who provides secretariat to the Taskforce), will now take on this role with support from Hannah Cornish and Graham Milne in NSD.

Chief Executive letter

6. CC advised that in preparation for the publication of the HIS Standards, she had written to all Chief Executives to request information on 3 key points:

I. A summary of existing arrangements in place to ensure effective, integrated joint working between the Health Board, Police Scotland and other partner organisations, covering the five broad areas covered by the HIS standards (leadership and governance; person centred care; facilities for forensic examinations; educational, training and clinical requirements; and consistent documentation). Where possible, this should include qualitative feedback received from individuals who access these services, as well as from staff who work in this area.
II. Detail about the current skills mix of professionals used to provide trauma informed, person centred care to individuals before, during and after a forensic examination.
III. Information about any immediate issues or concerns which may impact on Health Boards ability to deliver services that will meet the new HIS standards.

7. Elaine Mead (EM) was invited to comment on behalf of Chief Executives. EM advised that the CMO’s letter would be discussed at a meeting of CE’s (7 November) and flagged that some of these services may have been delegated to Integrated Joint Boards (as is the case in Highland), which means that different people may be accountable for different elements. CC thanked CM for raising this point.

8. CC said that the letter has been published on the Taskforce web-page and that responses have been sought by Mid-December. An update will be provided at the February meeting.

AP: TM to update regarding the responses from NHS Chief Executives.

Civic Centre visit

9. CC advised that she will be visiting the Civic Centre in Livingstone with Mr Matheson on 23 November to see the forensic medical examination facilities first hand and to meet with staff, following concerns that were raised about the out of hours facilities in particular. Hilary Ansell (HA) noted that the centre provides the best facilities in the SEAT region. Pauline McGough (PM) extended an invitation to CMO and the Cabinet Secretary to visit Archway as well.

10. CC thanked PM for this offer and reiterated that we want to ensure person centred services at all times. Members were asked to contact her directly if there are any particular issues that she or Mr Matheson should be aware of in advance of the visit.

11. There were no other matters arising.

AP: All to highlight any issues relevant to the visit to Livingstone, directly to CC.

Sub group updates

12. The Chair invited sub group chairs to provide an update

Workforce and training – Elaine Mead

13. EM advised that she is currently proposing a doctor based response but that it would be a game changer if the COPFS shift their position on accepting the opinion of Forensic Nurse Examiners (FNEs) in court. In the meantime, the group have been discussing that it might be necessary to de-couple the forensic and custody roles to make it more attractive to doctors.

14. EM noted she has not yet spoken to the Director of HR in the Lothian’s about the Terms and Conditions they offer, but that it was clear that there are discrepancies across the country. A Director of HR has been asked to join the group to look at Ts and Cs but the status and recognition of the Forensic Physician role also needs to be addressed as the workforce do not feel very valued at the moment. EM went on to note that training and support is now available through NES and reiterated the importance of peer support, particularly if FPs are seeing a small number of cases.

15. EM noted that the HIS standards are the gold standard but that different models of delivery across the 3 regions may be entirely appropriate (particularly as they may not be as readily achievable in more remote and rural areas). Related to this, EM advised that the group are looking at an ‘expert to victim’ model rather than ‘victim to expert’ in an effort to minimise the trauma caused by travelling long distances. Discussion followed about the need to provide timely support prior to a Forensic Medical Examination (FME) taking place (through an FNE or sexual health nurse for example), but that this area has not been looked at yet. EM concluded by saying that proposals are being developed to meet existing need but that unmet need is more difficult to scope. Graham Milne is also progressing some work to identify disclosures of rape and sexual assault through sexual health clinics.

16. CC invited comments from members. HA advised that whilst she agrees in principle with the proposal that it may be necessary to de-couple the role in some circumstances, this presents difficulties because twice as many FPs would be needed to cover two separate rotas (meaning you either pay people half or double the budget).

17. CC advised that a letter has been sent from the President of the Faculty for Forensic Physicians requesting that this become a specialism in its own right. CC said that whilst this has not yet reached a conclusion, her understanding is that the current policy position is that they are not minded to go in this direction.

18. CC invited PM to comment on the point about the number of disclosures made through sexual health clinics. PM said she will raise this at a meeting of sexual health leads on 8 December and noted that whilst sexual health services in some Boards are small, they could potentially contribute to clinical care rather than forensic services. PM advised that whilst recording of disclosures is not consistent, this could be introduced relatively easily (at a small cost).

AP: PM to provide update on what would be required to record sexual health disclosures nationally to help identify unmet need.

19. CC noted that sexual health is a core element of training in forensic medicine and queried whether there is potential to use this workforce to help increase the number of female FPs available to undertake FMEs and invited Ron McVicar (RM) to comment.

20. RM advised that two Associate Post Graduate Deans have been appointed on a job share basis (Dr Deb Wardle and Dr Julie Cumming) to make the FP training more accessible and portable – recognising that some with an interest in FME work are put off by the general custody work. RM explained that the training will be reduced to a one day course with a greater emphasis on pre work and on-line materials (available before and afterwards so that FPs seeing small number of cases can always access the resources they may require). The Islands will be the test bed for the new portable training (Shetland in January, Orkney to follow). An annual conference for peer review and peer referencing is also being developed.

21. CC invited comments on the issue of skills maintenance in remote and rural areas and how we plan for and ensure that people feel supported and capable of carrying out the work we are skilling them up for.

22. RM advised that annual peer review to compare practice as well as on-line ‘how to’ learning materials and guidance will help to address this. PM added that she will try to quantify how much sexual health resource might be available to provide FP cover.

AP: PM to feedback on sexual health resource potentially available for FME.

Clinical pathways – Pauline McGough

23. PM advised that her sub group has met three times and that the adult pathway has been progressed and circulated to sub group chairs to sense check. Hannah Cornish (HC) is working on another draft of the guidelines for clinicians for the next meeting and will speak to Sandra Ferguson (NES) to ensure that trauma informed practice is included. Dr Kate McKay and Dr Charlotte Kirk are working on the child pathway and hope to have a version ready for circulation by the end of November. DCI Mel Wade, Dr Mini Mishra (MM) and Dr Deborah Wardle (DW) are looking at the self–referral pathway and will ensure this takes cognisance of the current legislative position. Sandy Brindley (SB) suggested that views could be sought from the reference group on the draft pathways to ensure they are person centred. CC invited members to provide comments to PM before next the next sub group meeting in early December.

AP: PM and SB to take forward action for reference group to review adult and children pathways.

24. MM suggested that broader consultation with children’s groups on the draft pathway may be helpful. Iona Colvin (IC) agreed that child protection colleagues should be engaged as well as Local Authority social workers who provide support to children. IC clarified that social work involvement is not sought in adult cases (unless the individual already has a social worker).

AP: IC to speak to Jane Devine (Director Social Work Scotland) about this and report back.

25. SB queried how a Single Point of Contact would work with the Rape Crisis helpline. PM said that what a first point of entry should look like also needs to be discussed with the reference group.

AP: PM to seek views of reference group on single point of contact.

26. Yousaf Kanan (YK) queried whether existing routes in to services are tracked. Fiona Murphy (FM) noted that the data is not reliable due to double counting and under counting. YK advised that research has shown that people have a more positive experience if their Forensic Medical Examination (FME) is accompanied by immediate access to follow up services.

27.CC invited MM to provide a more detailed update on the self-referral pathway. MM advised that a couple of meetings had taken place to discuss the current models operating in Tayside and Archway. Tayside have seen fewer than ten self-referral cases in the last five years, so the group are concentrating on Archway. MM explained that Archway does not offer a walk in service and that acute referrals are received from GPs, drug and alcohol workers, A&E, teachers etc - but rarely from RCS. They have tried to ‘walk through’ what a new process could look like, starting with a central point of contact (such as a dedicated NHS 24 helpline). Providing there was no immediate risk to the individual, they could be asked what they would like to do (i.e. report to police / speak to a health care worker or RCS). Individual’s would be encouraged to talk to a nurse and SOLO about the health care and police process so they are clear about the implications of not reporting at that point in time. A consent form could explain that they may lose vital evidence such as CCTV and number plate recognition etc. Consideration would then need to be given as to whether the FP undertakes a full FME as they would if it were a police report or whether a more limited examination is performed, noting that clarity will be needed on what forensic samples (and photographs etc) would need to be kept in these circumstances from Scottish Police Authority (SPA) and COPFS. Consideration would also need to be given as to how to share anonymised intelligence with police, to track unmet need. MM explained that there are risks to police and health professionals that need to be mitigated. DW is to prepare a flow chart to help tease out these issues. This will be brought to SB and Taskforce members for comment.

AP: DW to circulate draft self-referral pathway for comment.

28. There was some discussion about the taking and storing of samples and that evidence from self-referrals has to be meaningful for the COPFS to use in a future court case. CC noted that this was a complicated issue and that legal advice was being sought. MM noted that the work on the self-referral pathway should not de-stabilise existing self-referral services which are being run on the basis of legal advice from the Central Legal Office and Police Scotland. Louise Raphael (LR) noted that a consistent self-referral pathway would be a major step forward and that she was glad this avenue was being pursued. She advised that Archway don’t have figures about how many self-referral cases went on to report to the police but that the sense she got from staff was that there were quite a few. She added that it was very encouraging that this work is being progressed in the way that it is.

29. FM advised that Elizabeth Ireland is in touch with NHS 24 to progress discussions on a Single Point of Contact. SB noted that RCS has lots of experience of discussing with victims what it means to report or not to report and that their intelligence sharing with the police can result in a conviction. YK noted that a dilemma is noted in the evidence of the need to separate the health care services (to address the individual’s physical and mental wellbeing) and the forensic medical services (required for the legal process). SB confirmed that there are separate forms for this in Archway.

Quality Improvement – Fiona Murphy

30. FM advised that a key part of this will be delivery of the new HIS standards which Fiona Wardle (FW) will update on. She went on to outline the other two areas of work being progressed by this sub group. The first is in relation to establishing the existing baseline and a national, standardised data collection set. Fiona MacKenzie in ISD will have that by end of next week and is also looking a future data collection requirements. FM advised that SG justice have not yet confirmed funding for this project but work is continuing. The second area of work is around clinical IT requirements (what is needed, not what we have now) and then seeing how well NASH, Adastra, other systems used in England can meet those needs, or whether something new has to be developed. A requirements capture workshop will take place later in November.

31. Next steps are to look at what (continuous / annual) data collection is needed to measure and demonstrate compliance with the HIS standards / quality indicators. MM noted that initial conversations had taken place with HIS on the development of the QIs and that she will follow this up with FM.

AP: MM to speak to FM about data requirements for audit and monitoring against the standards.

32. SB queried what data is collected from pharmacists (they should ask about sexual assault when prescribing the morning after pill). PM advised that the data is very minimal. CC noted that there needs to be improvement in pharmacists signposting to services and ensuring that they are equipped to have these conversations and what to do if a disclosure is made. PM advised that training will be provided to hospital and community pharmacists in April 2018 on prescribing emergency contraception which could provide an opportunity to look at this. It was noted that this training is voluntary and there was agreement that this needed to be embedded in national training. MM noted that the community pharmacy service specification for emergency hormonal contraception is to be reviewed and that training concerns have been fed in to the Chief Pharmaceutical Officer (CPO) but the lack of data collection has not been.

AP: PM to look at including sexual assault discussions in April training.

AP: PM to speak to Ron MacVicar to ensure this is embedded in national training.

AP: MM to feedback to CPO on data requirements and link in with FM.

User reference group

33. CC invited SB to provide an update. SB advised that the next meeting will take place at the start of December and that Elizabeth Ireland will be attending to discuss the Single Point of Contact / access to services and that the clinical pathways could be considered at a future meeting. A meeting had been held with SG and other stakeholders about improving the information provided to someone immediately after a rape or sexual assault. RCS have an action to consult with survivors on what more is needed. SB noted that FW had suggested hand held notes for individuals to take between services / record appointments etc. and that this would be worth exploring further.

34. SB noted that the main issue from survivor feedback (obtained through the referral protocol with Police Scotland) relating to the forensic examination, is about the lack of female doctors. There was discussion about the role of GPs who may be a first point of contact and the need to ensure they are appropriately trained to respond (i.e. STI swabs could not be used as evidence sample for forensic purposes). Dr Louise Wilson (LW) noted that this was very important because appointments with a GP may fall out with the 7 day forensic window. She said that work had started on providing inputs to GPs on this but it was not very co-ordinated. PM noted that training on sexual health and sexual assault is voluntary for GPs and they tend to be self-selecting. HA noted that in her experience, family planning training for GPs is well attended. She added that she wouldn’t persuade anyone to go to police if they disclosed a sexual assault to her and that a doctor is limited in what they can do during a 10 minute consultation. LW added that a GP may be aware of subtle indicators of other things happening in the background which could be important to other services.

35. A discussion followed about the role of a female chaperone and the need for one to be present during an examination, as well as the doctor.

AP: PM to speak to RM about how NES can support training for GPs.

Design and delivery of services – Elizabeth Ireland

36. CC noted that EI had given her apologies for the meeting but that she had spoken to her and could provide an update on her behalf. Good discussions are progressing with NHS 24 regarding a Single Point of Contact and that work is on-going regarding colposcope provision. Chief Executivess, IJBs and health and social work partnership leads are aware of the Taskforce work and what is coming out of the standards and they are all moving towards this. CC reiterated the need to ensure that the right people who are accountable for services know what is expected of them. FM added that there is a need to align service delivery with the regional delivery plans due in March and that EI has met with the regional planners about this and will do so again soon.

Social research

37. YK provided an update on his research project. He advised that he has undertaken a brief literature review (focused on adult based services) and that the most fruitful information relates to the role of nurses in other systems / jurisdictions in helping to meet the challenges around staffing, rotas, gender of examiner etc. He added that reluctance to expand the role of nurses appears to relate to cultural rather than ethics issues. He advised that in Canada, an individual’s disposition for role of forensic nurse examiner is evaluated as part of the recruitment process (i.e. empathy, unconscious bias) and that this is important for ensuring trauma informed care and practice. YK invited members to email him if there are any particular areas they want him to look at during his research. Fuller findings will brought to the February meeting.

AP: Members to contact YK directly if they want to discuss this work.

AP: YK to bring research findings to February meeting.

Taskforce work plan / next steps

38. CC invited EM to provide an update on the sub group chairs meeting held on 31 October 2017. EM advised that it was very helpful to have clarity about the focus of the other sub groups but that it was clear that the three different regions have different approaches and issues so it is important to look at workforce and training through that lens. She also noted that there has been some duplication of work across the groups and that we need to be thoughtful of clinicians time in servicing these groups. EM added that members now have a clear view on the best practice principles but that clarity is needed on whether regions have the remit to develop local plans for service delivery.

39. CC explained that the focus so far has been on mapping out and prioritising the work and that she is impressed with what the Taskforce has achieved with publication of the work plan and the work being progressed by the sub groups. CC added that the next step is move towards operational delivery and invited comments on the regional planning model. Iona Colvin (IC) queried what that would mean for child protection procedures and Police Scotland. She agreed to consider and report back on that point.

AP: IC to consider child protection implications of a regional delivery model.

40. FM added that we are close to knowing what the model should be but need clarity on whether it is okay for regional variations to exist or whether consistency at a national level is sought. There was discussion about the need for some elements of the service to be consistent nationally (Ts and Cs, national data sets, standards, pathways, equipment etc) but that how these are implemented will need to meet with local needs to ensure a sustainable service.

41. CC noted that it was right to consider how the HIS standards will be delivered and to be clear about what needs to be national and what can be varied locally. EM advised that the Regional Planners can ensure access to the right people (with the right skills) to operationalise this across Scotland but that it carries resource implications. IC added that there needs to be engagement between NHS and Local Authority Chief Executives and that this has this been flagged to them (from the perspective of the child protection interface). EM noted that robust local arrangements are in place for child protection in the North region.

42. It was agreed that a meeting should be arranged with the chairs of the sub groups, the regional planners, the new chair of the Network Board and SG officials to agree what has to be delivered nationally and what we would allow for local adaptation. CC made clear that we should start taking steps in towards the final answer and not be paralysed by waiting to have everything ready at once. FM noted that she has already spoken to the new Network Board chair (James Crichton) about this and that a meeting could be arranged for January. EM agreed this would be a sensible way forward.

AP: TM to liaise with Hannah Cornish about setting this up.

COPFS update

43. CMO invited Anne Marie-Hicks (AM-H) to summarise the paper from the Crown. AM-H advised that their IT system doesn’t allow an electronic search of records so this has had to be done manually. She explained that it is clear that there are a large number of cases which have had no involvement of FPs at all (particularly if historical / non-acute cases). Where FPs were involved, they were mostly indicted as witnesses but only a small number actually gave evidence in Court. The inconvenience of this to FPs was acknowledged. AM-H explained that there were a small number of cases where the defence provided their own experts but that this was not always a challenge to veracity of the FP’s opinion / evidence, but was to seek to undermine the complainers account under cross examination. There was discussion about the nature of the adversarial criminal justice system and the need to try and agree evidence in advance. AM-H agreed that there is room for improvement in this area but that it is for the Advocate Depute to judge whether to agree evidence in advance or indict, on the merit of case.

44. CC invited comments or questions. HA advised that in her experience, she is cited a lot but doesn’t give evidence very often but can be on standby for two weeks at a time. The inconvenience of floating trials was also discussed, particularly when trying to attract new people in to the service, or for GP’s and doctors with families etc. There was agreement that citing FPs less would be a huge improvement. AM-H advised that floating trials are out with COPFS control and that they impact on complainers as well but that there was scope to improve this.

AP: AM-H to consider the issue of citing FPs and explore where improvements can be made.

45. CC noted that these issues may be rooted in a historical way of working but that the process needs to be more person centred (for the complainer and the FP). AM-H advised that a phenomenal amount of work has been done to make the process more victim centred and the FP training explains what can happen in an adversarial process and why FP expertise is useful in court to bolster the victims case. PM suggested that more could be done to explain to FPs why they may be cited but that the process would be as streamlined as possible (with COPFS caveats).

AP: MM to speak to Ron MacVicar to ensure this is reflected in teaching and learning packages developed by NES.

46. CC asked whether there is scope for an increased use of ‘hot tubbing’ (agreeing expert advice in advance). AM-H advised that in an adversarial trial, the FPs evidence can be important and that it can be hard to get agreement in advance because the defence are looking for an edge / reasonable doubt for the jury. It was noted that there is more scope for this in Fatal Accident Inquiries but that it can be more complicated in rape cases. SB noted that trial scheduling (for victims and experts) is a fundamental issue that needs to be addressed and queried whether discussions can be had with the Scottish Court Service (SCS) about limiting the use of floating trials in these cases. AM-H advised that these discussions are always on-going with clerks about the impact of travel on witnesses etc, but that 70% of high court business relates to sexual crime so it is difficult to manage. She reiterated that she will look in to whether there is any scope for improvement. JK queried the use of informal arrangements with court staff so that FPs can be on one hour standby. AM-H noted that this does happen but it can still be inconvenient if arrangements need to be put in place for locums to provide cover.

HIS standards

47. CC invited Karen Ritchie (KR) to provide an update. KR advised that the consultation on the standards ended in the middle of September and that 56 responses were received from organisations and individuals. Targeted sessions were held with the Child Protection MCNs. The consultation responses were received and the standards revised accordingly. KR noted that the main areas identified for further development related to the 3 hour window between consent being given for a FME and this been carried out, and the use/role of chaperones. The project group have until the end of the week to provide final comments but that they are on schedule to publish on or before 22 December. HIS will work with SG on the communications strategy to accompany the publication.

48. CC welcomed this positive progress and thanked the project group for all of their hard work on this.

Work-plan next steps

49. CC noted that the high level work plan was published on 6 October and that the Cabinet Secretary for Justice had written to the Justice, Health and Education Committee’s to draw their attention to this. CC went on to say that good discussions were underway on how to move this forward and operationalise service delivery and that by the next meeting in February, the standards will be published, the meeting will have taken place with the regional planners and services in Shetland and Orkney will have moved forward. CC noted that the interface with child protection needs to be looked at and that ToR will be circulated before the February meeting.

Any other Business

50. TM advised that the NSPCC are holding an event in Parliament on Wednesday 15 November 2017, 12:45 – 14:15, hosted by Johann Lamont MSP to launch their research report relating to children’s access to recovery services after experiences of sexual abuse. Taskforce members are invited to attend.

AP: Members to advise TM if they wish to attend.

51. CC asked Louise Raphael whether HMICS have a date for carrying out their follow up report. LR advised that broad discussions had been had but nothing had been settled in terms of timing or remit. She added that at a minimum, they would be looking to measure progress against the recommendations in the original report but no decisions have been made if it will go beyond that.

AP: LR to advise on date for follow up HMICS report as soon as possible.

52. CC noted that the Taskforce and sub groups are demonstrating concrete progress towards improving services and thanked everyone for their contribution.

Dates of next meetings

7th February 2018 – 10:00-12:30 – 4ER, St Andrews House

Future dates

  • Tuesday, 15 May 2018 – 14.00 - 16.30 – Conf Rms C,D,E, SAH
  • Tuesday, 7 August 2018 – 14.00 - 16.30 – Conf Rms C,D,E, SAH
  • Tuesday, 6 November 2018 – 14.00 - 16.30 – Conf Rms C,D,E, SAH
Published:
12 Feb 2018
Rape and sexual assault victims services taskforce minutes: November 2017