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Publication - Statistics Publication

Recorded crime in Scotland: 2016-2017

Published: 26 Sep 2017
Part of:
Law and order, Public safety and emergencies, Statistics
ISBN:
9781788511971

Statistics on crimes and offences recorded and cleared up by the police in Scotland, split by crime or offence group and by local authority.

108 page PDF

2.5MB

108 page PDF

2.5MB

Contents
Recorded crime in Scotland: 2016-2017
Footnotes

108 page PDF

2.5MB

Footnotes

1. Population estimates are as at mid-year 2016 from the National Records of Scotland ( http://www.nrscotland.gov.uk/statistics-and-data/statistics/statistics-by-theme/population/population-estimates/mid-year-population-estimates).

2. Correct closure means either that (a) the incident was closed as non-crime related and contained sufficient information to dispel any inference of criminality; or (b) the incident indicated a crime had occurred and a crime record was traced

3. However, it should also be noted that bringing the two sources together in this way highlights that the SCJS and police recorded crime cover different populations and different timescales, and the SCJS does not cover the entire range of crimes and offences that the police are faced with.

4. Subsuming refers to the practice of counting multiple crimes as one crime, with less serious crimes subsumed within more serious crimes. For more information, please refer to Section D of the Scottish Crime Recording Standard (SCRS).

5. Incidents consist of all reports to the police, whether a crime is recorded or not.

6. Although the crime of Lewd and libidinous practices does not identify the age of the victim by its name, this crime code is specific to victims of historic crimes that were under 16 years of age. We have therefore included these crimes in our calculations.

7. Incidents consist of all reports to the police, whether a crime is recorded or not.

8. Incidents consist of all reports to the police, whether a crime is recorded or not.

9. Subsuming refers to the practice of counting multiple crimes as one crime, with less serious crimes subsumed within more serious crimes. For more information, please refer to Section D of the Scottish Crime Recording Standard (SCRS).

10. Incidents consist of all reports to the police, whether a crime is recorded or not.

11. Information about crime in Scotland is also available from other sources: for example, other Scottish Government reports, which provide data on anti-social behavior, harassment and discrimination, the Scottish Household Survey, and other sources, such as Police Scotland and the Scottish Police Authority.

12. There have been some changes to the SCJS since 2008-09, for example, the SCJS sample changed to an unclustered design in 2012-13, however this is not thought to have introduced any bias to the results.

13. As demonstrated, for example, by the confidence interval around the estimated number of SCJS crimes in 2006, compared to later surveys.

14. Figures for the confidence interval rounded to nearest thousand.

15. Figures for the confidence interval rounded to nearest thousand.

16. Figures for the confidence interval rounded to nearest thousand.

17. Subject to the back-dated change whereby Offences related to serious organised crime has been moved from Group 1 to Group 5. See ' Data Considerations' section.

18. http://www.gov.scot/Topics/Statistics/Browse/Crime-Justice/PubRecordedCrime/SCRB

19. Subsuming refers to the practice of counting multiple crimes as one crime, with less serious crimes subsumed within more serious crimes. For more information, please refer to Section D of the Scottish Crime Recording Standard (SCRS).


Contact

Email: Jamie Macfarlane, jamie.macfarlane@gov.scot

Phone: 0300 244 4000 – Central Enquiry Unit

The Scottish Government
St Andrew's House
Regent Road
Edinburgh
EH1 3DG