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Publication -

Registration of independent schools in Scotland: guidance

Published: 25 Nov 2014
ISBN:
0755949978

Guidance notes for proprietors of new and existing independent schools.

57 page PDF

533.0kB

57 page PDF

533.0kB

Contents
Registration of independent schools in Scotland: guidance
CURRICULUM

57 page PDF

533.0kB

CURRICULUM

80. Ministers expect children in Scotland to receive the breadth and the depth of education they need, which increases pupils' skills and knowledge. Normally the curriculum should comprise the following curriculum areas:

a) Languages and literacy, including the opportunity to study a foreign language

b) Mathematics and numeracy

c) Science

d) Technologies

e) Social studies

f) Health and wellbeing, including mental, emotional, social and physical wellbeing

g) Expressive arts

h.) Religious and moral education

81. The areas of literacy, numeracy and health and wellbeing are the responsibility of all teachers. Schools have flexibility on how they structure learning to meet this breadth required.

82. The curriculum should be in line with pupils' needs, and appropriate to their age, stage of development and experience. It should take account the range of ways in which pupils learn and should include opportunities to interact with other pupils and with the teacher, and to take part in practical activities.

83. Principles of curriculum design are challenge and enjoyment, breadth, progression, depth, personalisation and choice, coherence and relevance and must be taken into account for all children and young people.  The curriculum is designed to enable learners to develop as successful learners, confident individuals, responsible citizens and effective contributors.    It is of particular importance that the curriculum prepares all learners for the challenges they face, by equipping them with the skills for learning, life and work.

84. It is the responsibility of the proprietor to ensure that parents, including prospective parents, are aware of how the curriculum offered by the school meets these criteria. When a school wishes to offer a curriculum which does not reflect the ethos set out in paragraphs 80-83 it should ensure that parents understand why, and the impact this could have on the pupils' experience and options for post school education and work is considered. Lack of facilities in itself should not preclude the offering of any aspect of the curriculum.

85. Independent schools may wish to use sources of curricular advice. Guidance on Scotland's 3-18 curriculum, Curriculum for Excellence, is available on the Education Scotland website at http://www.educationscotland.gov.uk/thecurriculum/. The website provides guidance on curriculum design and planning, and on the experiences and outcomes for each curriculum area. This is further supported by a growing range of good practice examples for each curriculum area also available online.


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