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Publication - Statistics Publication

Scotland's People: Results from the 2015 Scottish Household Survey

Published: 27 Sep 2016
Part of:
Statistics
ISBN:
9781786524416

Report presenting reliable and up-to-date information on the composition, characteristics and behaviour of Scottish households.

287 page PDF

5.4MB

287 page PDF

5.4MB

Contents
Scotland's People: Results from the 2015 Scottish Household Survey
13 Culture and Heritage

287 page PDF

5.4MB

13 Culture and Heritage

13.1 Introduction and Context

The Scottish Government is committed to ensuring that everyone in Scotland has an opportunity to access, enjoy and participate in cultural activity and can experience and enjoy our heritage. Culture, creativity and a rich, dynamic heritage sit at the heart of Scotland's communities. The Scottish Government aims to:

  • Promote and develop the crucial role of culture and creativity in making the strongest contribution that we can to sustainable economic development;
  • Focus on the contribution that culture can make to improving the health, wellbeing, confidence and quality of life for our communities;
  • Encourage the understanding, value and enjoyment of the historic environment, and to promote the care and protection of this precious and dynamic resource to ensure a rich legacy for future generations;
  • Raise the profile of Scotland at home and abroad, and ensure that as many people as possible in Scotland and overseas are able to benefit from, be inspired by and enjoy the very best of Scotland's creative, cultural and historic wealth.

The Government's work is focused on widening access and participation and ensuring that the necessary infrastructure is in place to deliver cultural opportunities whilst promoting a drive to achieve cultural excellence. This work contributes to the Government's strategic objectives [76] , through understanding and monitoring levels of cultural engagement and participation both at the national and sub-national levels, to inform decisions on government and local government policy making. For example, data from the Scottish Household Survey ( SHS) informs our National Indicator 41: Increase cultural engagement.

Cultural engagement is defined as those adults who have either participated in a cultural activity or who have attended at least one type of cultural event or place in the past 12 months. The SHS is the primary source of information on cultural attendance and participation in Scotland and is the only source of data on attendance and participation at local authority level. Questions on cultural attendance were introduced in the SHS for the first time in 2007. From 2012 onwards, it is possible to obtain data at local authority level every year. For 2015, these data will be published at a later date.

Attendance at "a cultural event or place of culture" is defined as those adults who attended at least one type of cultural place in the previous year. There are a number of different types of cultural events and places of culture: cinemas, museums libraries and live music events, for example. Likewise, participation in any cultural activity means that adults take part in at least one activity in the previous year. Examples of cultural activities include reading for pleasure, dancing and crafts.

Annex 2: Glossary provides a full list of activities, places or events for cultural attendance and participation.

In previous reports, culture and sport were included in the same chapter. However, participation in sport and exercise, and satisfaction with local authority sport and leisure services, are now included in the Sport chapter.

Please note that figures from 2012 onwards are not directly comparable with previous years, due to a change of wording in 2012. More detail about the culture questions can be found in the historical SHS questionnaires [77] .

Main Findings

Culture

Around nine in ten (92 per cent) adults were culturally engaged in 2015, either by attending or visiting a cultural event or place or by participating in a cultural activity. The level of cultural engagement in Scotland has increased by around 5 percentage points since it was first recorded in 2007.

Cultural attendance

More women than men attended cultural events (85 per cent and 80 per cent respectively). This was a slight increase for women since 2014. When cinema visits are excluded, women were still more likely than men to attend cultural events (78 per cent and 71 per cent respectively).

Levels of cultural attendance were lowest in the oldest age group, particularly in relation to cinema attendance. Eighty-one per cent of 16 to 24 year olds visited a cinema in the last 12 months, compared with 18 per cent of adults aged 75 and over.

Attendance at cultural places or events was highest for those with degrees or professional qualifications (94 per cent) and lowest for those with no qualifications (58 per cent).

Those living in the 20 per cent least deprived areas of Scotland were more likely to attend cultural events or places than those living in the most deprived areas (91 per cent compared to 72 per cent). In all quintiles, attendance increased by between 2 and 6 per cent between 2012 and 2015.

Cultural attendance was lower for those with a long-term physical or mental health condition, especially if the condition caused a major reduction in daily capacity (54 per cent, compared with 88 per cent for those with no such condition).

Cultural participation

The most popular form of cultural participation was reading for pleasure. Overall participation in cultural activities was higher among women than men (85 per cent to 73 per cent); although this does vary by activity.

Cultural participation was broadly similar for all age groups (ranging between 76 per cent to 81 per cent). Participation in most activities, particularly in using computers and social media, decreases in the older age groups; the exceptions to this are in reading for pleasure and crafts.

Those with a degree or professional qualification were more likely to participate than adults with no qualifications (93 per cent compared to 60 per cent). The gap between these two groups increases when reading is excluded.

There was a 20 percentage point difference in cultural participation between those living in the 20 per cent most deprived and the 20 per cent least deprived areas (68 per cent compared with 88 per cent). This is consistent with the differences observed for cultural attendance.

Cultural participation was lower for those with a long-term physical or mental health condition, especially if this caused major reduced daily capacity (67 per cent, compared with 81 per cent for those with no such condition).

Cultural services provided by local authorities

Adults (including non-users) were generally more satisfied with local authority services provision in 2015 than they were in 2007. Library services saw a decline in reported satisfaction during this period (6 percentage points, from 55 per cent in 2007 to 49 per cent in 2015).

In 2015, around nine in ten adults who had used these services were very or fairly satisfied with each provision. This is particularly true for libraries which have the highest satisfaction rate among users (92 per cent)

13.2 Cultural Engagement

Figure 13.1 shows that around nine in ten adults had attended or participated in some cultural event or activity in 2015 (92 per cent). Trips to the cinema make up the majority of cultural attendance, and reading for pleasure is the most common participation activity. The level of cultural engagement in Scotland has increased by around 5 percentage points since it was first recorded in the SHS in 2007.

Figure 13.1: Cultural engagement by adults in the last 12 months by year

Percentages, 2007 to 2015 data (minimum base: 9,410)

Figure 13.1: Cultural engagement by adults in the last 12 months by year

* Note that the figures for from 2012 onwards are not directly comparable with previous years due to changes in the wording of the cultural attendance and participation questions.

13.3 Attendance at Cultural Events and Places

In 2015, around eight in ten adults had attended a cultural event or place of culture in the last 12 months. When trips to the cinema are excluded, the attendance figure was lower at 75 per cent. Since 2012, attendance when cinema trips are included has increased from 78 per cent to 82 per cent. When trips to the cinema are excluded, the attendance figure has increased from 70 per cent to 75 per cent.

Attendance at individual cultural events or places has been broadly static or increased by one or two percentage points since 2012. However, there have been larger increases in some areas. The number of adults who attended street art events has increased by 6 percentage points between 2012 and 2015 (12 per cent to 18 per cent). Similarly, visits to historical or archaeological places increased by 5 percentage points (28 to 33 per cent).

Figure 13.2 shows how attendance has changed since 2012.

Figure 13.2: Attendance at cultural events and visiting places of culture in the last 12 months

Percentage of adults, 2012 to 2015 data (minimum base: 9,410)

Figure 13.2: Attendance at cultural events and visiting places of culture in the last 12 months

13.3.1 Attendance by Gender and Age

More women attended a cultural event than men (85 per cent and 80 per cent). Women also had higher cultural attendance than men after excluding trips to the cinema, increasing the gap to seven percentage points (78 per cent and 71 per cent).

Table 13.1 shows that in 2015, attendance in the last 12 months at specific cultural events and visiting places of culture varied by gender and age:

  • More women than men attended the theatre (41 per cent, compared with 27 per cent). Women were also more likely than men to visit the library (33 per cent compared with 26 per cent).
  • People in the younger age groups were more likely to have attended the cinema. Eighty-one percent of adults aged 16 to 24 and 74 per cent of 25-34 year olds visited the cinema, compared with 18 per cent of those aged 75 or over. Similarly, almost half of 16 to 24 year olds attended a live music event, compared with a quarter of 60 to 74 year olds.

Table 13.1: Attendance at cultural events and visiting places of culture in the last 12 months by gender and age

Percentages, 2015 data

Adults Male Female 16 to 24 25 to 34 35 to 44 45 to 59 60 to 74 75 plus All
Cinema 56 59 81 74 71 56 37 18 57
Live music event - e.g. traditional music, rock concert, jazz event (not opera or classical music performance) 35 33 43 40 38 39 24 10 34
Theatre - e.g. pantomime / musical / play 27 41 24 30 39 39 37 27 34
Library (including mobile and online) 26 33 29 29 40 26 30 27 30
Museum 32 32 26 37 44 32 30 19 32
Historic place - e.g. castle, stately home and grounds, battle or archaeological site 33 33 25 35 44 37 31 18 33
Gallery 20 21 18 21 25 22 20 11 20
Exhibition - including art, photography and crafts 16 18 14 14 20 20 19 10 17
Street arts ( e.g. musical performances or art in parks, streets or shopping centre) 17 20 19 21 24 21 13 7 18
Culturally specific festival
( e.g. mela /Feis/ local Gala days)
15 15 13 18 23 17 11 5 15
Dance show / event - e.g. ballet 8 15 11 11 16 13 10 7 12
Classical music performance or opera 8 10 6 6 7 10 12 10 9
Book festival or reading group 4 6 2 4 7 5 6 3 5
Archive or records office ( e.g. Scotland's Family History Peoples Centre) 2 2 2 1 2 3 3 2 2
None 20 15 10 9 10 18 25 40 18
Any cultural attendance (excluding cinema) 71 78 71 81 84 76 71 58 75
Any cultural attendance (including cinema) 80 85 90 91 90 82 75 60 82
Base 4,240 5,160 750 1,210 1,390 2,440 2,380 1,240 9,410

Columns may not add to 100 per cent since multiple responses were allowed.

13.3.2 Attendance by Highest Level of Qualification

Figure 13.3 shows that in 2015, adults with degrees or professional qualifications were most likely to attend cultural places and events in 2015; whereas attendance was lowest for those with no qualifications (94 per cent compared to 58 per cent). The pattern holds when cinema attendance is excluded (91 percent to 49 per cent).

Table 13.2 gives a breakdown of attendance at each individual cultural event or place. As with the overall figure, attendance was consistently higher for adults with a degree or professional qualification. The most marked differences between those with degrees and no qualifications can be seen for attendance at the cinema (72 per cent and 25 per cent respectively) and at an historic place (57 per cent and 11 per cent respectively).

Figure 13.3: Attendance at cultural events and visiting places of culture in the last 12 months by highest level of qualification

2015 data, percentage of adults (minimum base: 480)

Figure 13.3: Attendance at cultural events and visiting places of culture in the last 12 months by highest level of qualification

Table 13.2: Attendance at cultural events and visiting places of culture in the last 12 months by highest qualification level

Percentages, 2015 data

Adults Degree, Professi-
onal qualific-
ation
HNC/ HND or equivalent Higher, A level or equivalent O' Grade, Standard grade or equivalent Other qualific-
ation
No qualifi-
cations
All
Cinema 72 67 68 56 32 25 57
Live music event - e.g. traditional music, rock concert, jazz event (not opera or classical music performance) 47 41 41 28 15 13 34
Theatre - e.g. pantomime / musical / play 50 36 34 26 30 18 34
Library (including mobile and online) 42 35 31 21 20 18 30
Museum 52 36 31 21 16 14 32
Historic place - e.g. castle, stately home and grounds, battle or archaeological site 57 39 33 20 18 11 33
Gallery 38 22 20 11 8 5 20
Exhibition - including art, photography and crafts 34 20 15 7 8 4 17
Street arts ( e.g. musical performances or art in parks, streets or shopping centre) 29 20 20 14 10 6 18
Culturally specific festival
( e.g. mela /Feis/ local Gala days)
25 20 15 10 7 6 15
Dance show / event - e.g. ballet 18 14 12 8 8 5 12
Classical music performance or opera 19 6 7 4 5 2 9
Book festival or reading group 11 4 4 2 2 1 5
Archive or records office ( e.g. Scotland's Family History Peoples Centre) 4 2 2 1 2 1 2
None 6 10 11 19 34 42 18
Any cultural attendance (excluding cinema) 91 82 80 68 60 49 75
Any cultural attendance (including cinema) 94 90 89 81 66 58 82
Base 2,640 1,000 1,480 1,800 480 1,940 9,410

Columns add to more than 100 per cent since multiple responses allowed.

13.3.3 Attendance by Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation ( SIMD)

Figure 13.4 shows that levels of cultural attendance increase as deprivation as measured by the Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation ( SIMD 2012) decreases.

There was a 19 percentage point difference in cultural attendance between the 20 per cent most and 20 per cent least deprived areas (72 per cent compared with 91 per cent). When excluding cinema attendance, the difference is greater (23 percentage points: 62 per cent in the most deprived areas and 85 per cent in the least deprived areas). This gap was slightly larger in 2014 (26 percentage points).

Figure 13.4: Attendance at cultural events and visiting places of culture in the last 12 months by Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation

2015 data, adults (minimum base: 1,640)

Figure 13.4: Attendance at cultural events and visiting places of culture in the last 12 months by Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation

Table 13.3: Attendance at cultural events and visiting places of culture in the last 12 months by area deprivation

Percentages, 2012 to 2015 data

Adults 2012 2013 2014 2015 Base (2015)
Attend-
ance (including cinema)
Attend-
ance (excluding cinema)
Attend-
ance (including cinema)
Attend-
ance (excluding cinema)
Attend-
ance (including cinema)
Attend-
ance (excluding cinema)
Attend-
ance (including cinema)
Attend-
ance (excluding cinema)
20% Most deprived 70 60 72 61 70 60 72 62 1,740
2 73 63 76 67 76 68 79 69 1,900
3 77 69 79 71 81 74 83 75 2,050
4 82 75 85 78 84 78 87 81 2,080
20% Least deprived 88 83 90 85 91 86 91 85 1,640
Scotland 78 70 80 72 80 73 82 75 9,410

13.3.4 Attendance by Long-Term Physical/Mental Health Condition

Figure 13.5 shows that cultural attendance was lowest among adults with a physical or mental health condition that caused long term major reduced daily capacity (54 per cent compared to 88 per cent attendance for those with no condition). For those whose condition caused minor reduced daily capacity, the attendance rate was 77 per cent.

Figure 13.5: Attendance at cultural events and visiting places of culture in the last 12 months by long term physical/mental health condition

2015 data, adults (minimum base: 1,200)[leave blank]

Figure 13.5: Attendance at cultural events and visiting places of culture in the last 12 months by long term physical/mental health condition

13.3.5 Frequency of Attending cultural events or places

The library was the most frequently attended cultural place or event, with almost one in five people (18 per cent) attending at least once a week, and double that number attending at least once a month (37 per cent). Cinema attendance was the next most popular, with 22 per cent of respondents attending at least once a month.

Table 13.4 shows the frequency of cultural attendance in the past year.

Table 13.4: Frequency of attending cultural events and visiting places of culture in the last 12 months

Row percentages, 2015 data

Adults At least once a week Less often than once a week / at least once a month Less often than once a month but within the last 12 months Don't know Total Base
Cinema 3 22 75 0 100 4,830
Live music event - e.g. traditional music, rock concert, jazz event (not opera or classical music performance) 1 11 87 0 100 2,920
Theatre - e.g. pantomime / musical / play 0 4 95 0 100 3,130
Library (including mobile and online) 18 37 44 1 100 2,890
Museum 1 8 90 0 100 2,920
Historic place - e.g. castle, stately home and grounds, battle or archaeological site 1 10 89 0 100 3,010
Gallery 1 9 89 0 100 1,890
Exhibition - including art, photography and crafts 0 6 93 0 100 1,670
Street arts ( e.g. musical performances or art in parks, streets or shopping centre) 3 5 92 1 100 1,540
Culturally specific festival ( e.g. mela /Feis/ local Gala days) 0 2 98 0 100 1,370
Dance show / event - e.g. ballet 1 5 94 1 100 1,020
Classical music performance or opera 2 8 89 0 100 850
Book festival or reading group 2 9 87 2 100 440
Archive or records office ( e.g. Scotland's Family History Peoples Centre) 4 10 85 1 100 220

Columns add to more than 100 per cent since multiple responses allowed.

13.4 Participation in Cultural Activities

Figure 13.6 shows levels of participation by adults at specific cultural activities in the last 12 months between 2012 and 2015.

The chart shows that:

  • Overall participation in 2015 was 79 per cent, which is largely unchanged since 2012. When reading is excluded, participation was 52 per cent. This has increased, year on year, from 48 per cent in 2012.
  • Reading for pleasure was by far the most common cultural activity in 2015, with 69 per cent of respondents saying that they had done this in the last year.
  • The next most popular activity was doing creative work on a computer or by social media (25 per cent), followed by crafts (16 per cent) and dance (14 per cent). Participation levels in all other cultural activities was 12 per cent or less.
  • About one in five people (21 per cent) had not participated in any cultural activity in the last 12 months.

Figure 13.6: Participation in cultural activities in the last 12 months

Percentage of adults (minimum base: 9,410)

Figure 13.6: Participation in cultural activities in the last 12 months

13.4.1 Participation by Gender and Age

Table 13.5 shows that in 2015, more women than men participated in a cultural activity in the last 12 months (85 per cent and 73 per cent respectively). When reading is excluded, the difference between women and men was slightly smaller (9 percentage points).

Overall cultural participation was broadly similar for all age groups; however, participation decreased with age when reading was excluded from the measure.

In 2015, participation in specific cultural activities varied by gender and age:

  • Women participated more than men in a number of cultural activities including reading for pleasure (76 per cent compared with 60 per cent), crafts (25 per cent compared with 6 per cent) and dance (17 per cent compared with 10 per cent).
  • Men had higher participation rates than women for playing a musical instrument or writing music (15 per cent of men and 9 per cent of women) and photography/making films or videos (13 per cent compared with 9 per cent).
  • Younger adults, particularly those aged 16-24 were more likely to produce creative work using computer or social media. However, reading for pleasure and craftwork such as knitting, woodwork and pottery were more popular with older age groups.

Table 13.5: Participation in any cultural activity in the last 12 months by gender and age

Column percentages, 2015 data

Adults Male Female 16 to 24 25 to 34 35 to 44 45 to 59 60 to 74 75 plus All
Read for pleasure (not newspapers, magazines or comics) 60 76 59 64 70 72 72 70 69
Used a computer / social media to produce creative work of any kind 27 24 39 30 30 25 17 6 25
Crafts such as knitting, wood, pottery, etc. 6 25 8 13 14 17 23 19 16
Dance - e.g. ceilidh, salsa, Highland dancing, ballet 10 17 17 16 14 14 11 7 14
Played a musical instrument or written music 15 9 20 14 12 11 8 5 12
Photography / making films or videos as an artistic activity (not family or holiday 'snaps') 13 9 13 12 14 11 10 3 11
Painting, drawing, printmaking or sculpture 9 15 19 17 14 10 7 5 12
Creative writing - stories, books, plays or poetry 4 4 7 6 5 4 3 2 4
Took part in a play / sang in a choir or other performance (not karaoke) 3 5 6 3 3 3 4 4 4
Other cultural activity 3 3 2 2 3 4 4 3 3
None 27 15 23 23 19 19 20 24 21
Participated in any (excluding reading) 47 56 61 55 54 52 50 36 52
Participated in any (including reading) 73 85 77 77 81 81 80 76 79
Base 4,240 5,160 750 1,210 1,390 2,440 2,380 1,240 9,410

Columns add to more than 100 per cent since multiple responses allowed.

13.4.2 Participation by Highest Level of Qualification

As with cultural attendance, Figure 13.7 and Table 13.6 show that participation in cultural activities in 2015 was highest among adults with a degree or professional qualification (93 per cent) and lowest for those with no qualifications (60 per cent). When reading is excluded, the difference between qualification levels is even greater (71 per cent for those with a degree or professional qualifications, compared with 30 per cent for those with no qualifications). Participation rates for specific cultural activities are shown in Table 13.6.

Figure 13.7: Participation in any cultural activity in the last 12 months by highest level of qualification

2015 data, percentage of adults (minimum base: 480)

Figure 13.7: Participation in any cultural activity in the last 12 months by highest level of qualification

Table 13.6: Participation in cultural activities in the last 12 months by highest level of qualification

Percentages, 2015 data

Adults Degree, Professio-nal qualific-ation HNC/ HND or equivalent Higher, A level or equivalent O Grade, Standard grade or equivalent Other qualific-ation No qualific-ations All
Read for pleasure (not newspapers, magazines or comics) 86 72 70 59 64 48 69
Used a computer / social media to produce creative work of any kind 39 31 26 20 13 7 25
Crafts such as knitting, wood, pottery, etc. 22 17 15 11 17 12 16
Dance - e.g. ceilidh, salsa, Highland dancing, ballet 23 14 13 8 8 7 14
Played a musical instrument or written music 21 11 13 7 5 5 12
Photography / making films or videos as an artistic activity (not family or holiday 'snaps') 19 13 10 6 4 2 11
Painting, drawing, printmaking or sculpture 17 14 13 10 6 4 12
Creative writing - stories, books, plays or poetry 8 4 5 2 1 1 4
Took part in a play / sang in a choir or other performance (not karaoke) 7 2 5 2 3 1 4
Other cultural activity 6 3 2 3 4 1 3
None 7 15 19 28 26 40 21
Participated in any (excluding reading) 71 58 52 43 42 30 52
Participated in any (including reading) 93 85 81 72 74 60 79
Base 2,640 1,000 1,480 1,800 480 1,940 9,410

Columns add to more than 100 per cent since multiple responses allowed.

13.4.3 Participation by Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation ( SIMD)

Table 13.7 and Figure 13.8 show that levels of cultural participation increase as deprivation as measured by the Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation ( SIMD 2012) decreases. Sixty-eight per cent of adults in the 20 per cent most deprived areas participated in cultural activities, compared with 88 per cent of adults in the 20 per cent least deprived areas. When reading is excluded, the pattern is similar, with 42 per cent in the most deprived areas and 60 per cent in the least deprived areas of Scotland participating in cultural activity.

Figure 13.8: Participation in any cultural activity in the last 12 months by Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation

2015 data, adults (minimum base: 1,640)

Figure 13.8: Participation in any cultural activity in the last 12 months by Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation

Table 13.7: Participation in any cultural activity in the last 12 months by area deprivation

Percentages, 2012 to 2015 data

Adults 2012 2013 2014 2015 Base (2015)
Participation (including reading) Participation (excluding reading) Participation (including reading) Participation (excluding reading) Participation (including reading) Participation (excluding reading) Participation (including reading) Participation (excluding reading)
20% Most deprived 68 38 68 40 69 40 68 42 1,740
2 74 42 73 44 73 43 73 46 1,900
3 80 49 79 50 78 50 80 52 2,050
4 83 55 83 53 85 58 85 58 2,080
20% Least deprived 87 55 88 56 88 58 88 60 1,640
Scotland 78 48 78 49 79 50 79 52 9,410

13.4.4 Participation by Long-Term Physical/Mental Health Condition

Figure 13.9 shows that cultural participation was lower for those with a physical or mental health condition (lasting, or expected to last 12 months or more). Participation was lowest where this condition caused long term major reduced daily capacity (67 per cent) compared with 81 per cent participation for those with no such condition.

When reading is excluded, participation for those with conditions with major reduced daily capacity was 38 per cent and, for those with no condition, it was 54 per cent. For those with minor reduced daily capacity, the participation rate was 51 per cent.

Figure 13.9: Participation in any cultural activity in the last 12 months by long term physical/mental health condition

2015 data, adults (minimum base: 1,200)

Figure 13.9: Participation in any cultural activity in the last 12 months by long term physical/mental health condition

13.4.5 Frequency of Participating in Cultural Activities

Table 13.8 shows that reading for pleasure was the cultural activity most frequently participated in. Of those who read for pleasure, 77 per cent did so at least once a week, and a further 12 per cent read at least once a month. Using a computer or social media for creative work was also popular among participants, with 68 per cent of those who participated having done so at least once a week.

Respondents participated in cultural activities more frequently than they attended cultural places or events. Eighteen per cent attended a library at least once a week but, apart from this, attendance at cultural events at least once a week was low. However, participation in cultural activities at least once a week ranged from 20 per cent to 77 per cent.

Table 13.8: Frequency of participating in cultural activities in the last 12 months

Row percentages, 2015 data

Adults At least once a week Less often than once a week / at least once a month Less often than once a month but within the last 12 months Don't know Total Base
Read for pleasure (not newspapers, magazines or comics) 77 12 11 0 100 6,540
Used a computer / social media to produce creative work of any kind 68 14 17 1 100 2,130
Crafts such as knitting, wood, pottery, etc. 48 25 27 0 100 1,740
Dance - e.g. ceilidh, salsa, Highland dancing, ballet 20 21 59 0 100 1,200
Played a musical instrument or written music 53 27 20 0 100 1,020
Photography / making films or videos as an artistic activity (not family or holiday 'snaps') 35 35 29 0 100 990
Painting, drawing, printmaking or sculpture 36 29 34 1 100 1,040
Creative writing - stories, books, plays or poetry 37 30 32 1 100 390
Took part in a play / sang in a choir or other performance (not karaoke) 38 16 43 3 100 340
Other cultural activity 46 24 29 0 100 310

Columns add to more than 100 per cent since multiple responses allowed.

13.5 Satisfaction with Local Authority Cultural Services

Since 2007, questions have been asked in the SHS on the frequency of use and satisfaction with local authority cultural services. As noted at the beginning of this chapter, findings on sport and leisure are reported elsewhere.

Table 13.9 presents the results for satisfaction with three different types of local authority services in 2015. It shows that adults (including users and non-users of these services) were more satisfied with museums and galleries and with theatres or concert halls in 2015 than they had been in 2007. This increase was relatively small, 4 to 5 percentage points across this period for each type of service, and with small declines in 2010. However, there has been a 6 percentage point decrease in satisfaction with library services (from 55 per cent in 2007 and 2008 to 49 per cent in 2014 and 2015).

Table 13.9: Satisfaction with local authority culture services

Column percentages, 2007 to 2015 data

Adults 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
Libraries
Very/fairly satisfied 55 55 53 52 52 50 51 49 49
Neither satisfied or dissatisfied 10 8 7 8 8 8 10 12 15
Very/fairly dissatisfied 3 2 2 3 2 2 2 2 2
No opinion 32 34 37 38 37 39 38 36 34
Museums and galleries
Very/fairly satisfied 41 42 41 38 44 42 44 46 46
Neither satisfied or dissatisfied 14 12 10 11 10 10 11 14 16
Very/fairly dissatisfied 4 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2
No opinion 41 42 45 48 44 46 42 38 35
Theatres or concert halls
Very/fairly satisfied 44 44 43 42 45 44 46 47 48
Neither satisfied or dissatisfied 14 11 10 10 10 9 10 13 15
Very/fairly dissatisfied 5 4 4 3 3 2 2 2 3
No opinion 38 40 43 45 42 45 42 38 35
Base 10,220 9,240 9,710 9,020 9,660 9,890 9,920 9,800 9,410

Table 13.10 shows levels of satisfaction with local authority provision is considerably higher when only users of the services are included in the analysis. In 2015, around nine in ten adults were either very or fairly satisfied with each of the three services (between 90 per cent and 92 per cent). Satisfaction with library services has been consistent since 2007 (between 90 and 92 per cent). As noted above, the overall level of satisfaction with library services has decreased since 2007, with satisfaction levels among non-users driving the decrease.

Table 13.10: Satisfaction with local authority culture services. (Service users within the past 12 months only)

Column percentages, 2007 to 2015 data

Adults 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
Libraries
Very/fairly satisfied 90 92 92 91 92 93 92 92 92
Neither satisfied or dissatisfied 5 4 4 4 4 3 3 4 4
Very/fairly dissatisfied 3 3 3 4 2 2 3 2 3
No opinion 2 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 1
Base 4,090 3,510 3,590 3,400 3,510 3,450 3,370 3,270 3,100
Museums and galleries
Very/fairly satisfied 87 89 88 87 90 92 91 92 91
Neither satisfied or dissatisfied 8 7 6 7 5 3 4 5 6
Very/fairly dissatisfied 2 2 3 2 1 2 2 1 2
No opinion 3 2 4 4 4 3 3 2 2
Base 2,870 2,630 2,720 2,460 2,830 2,800 2,980 3,020 2,920
Theatres or concert halls
Very/fairly satisfied 86 87 88 88 89 90 91 91 90
Neither satisfied or dissatisfied 8 6 6 6 5 5 4 5 6
Very/fairly dissatisfied 3 4 3 3 3 2 2 2 2
No opinion 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3
Base 3,560 3,210 3,270 2,960 3,280 3,020 3,260 3,290 3,340

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