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Publication - Statistics Publication

Scottish Schools Adolescent Lifestyle and Substance Use Survey 2015: mental wellbeing report

Published: 17 May 2017
Part of:
Children and families, Education, Health and social care
ISBN:
9781786529626

Report on the mental wellbeing of adolescents in Scotland.

44 page PDF

3.4MB

44 page PDF

3.4MB

Contents
Scottish Schools Adolescent Lifestyle and Substance Use Survey 2015: mental wellbeing report
3 Emotional and behavioural problem, mental wellbeing and deprivation

44 page PDF

3.4MB

3 Emotional and behavioural problem, mental wellbeing and deprivation

This section details factors that are linked to differences in emotional and behavioural problems and mental wellbeing for adolescents. Here, we focus our analysis on the relationship between area based deprivation (using the Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation ( SIMD)), and emotional and behavioural problems (using the Strengths and Difficulties total difficulties score) and mental wellbeing (using WEMWBS mean scores). When analysing deprivation, it should be kept in mind that using SIMD means that we are looking at an area based measure to identify deprivation in individuals. Many people who are materially disadvantaged as individuals live in areas that are not particularly deprived in terms of SIMD; equally, many people living in deprived areas (as identified by SIMD) may not be particularly disadvantaged.

SIMD and total difficulties score

There was a clear link between SIMD and emotional and behavioural problems. Pupils who lived in the least deprived SIMD were less likely than those in the most deprived areas to have a borderline or abnormal total difficulties score.

As Figure 3.1 shows, in 2015 pupils who lived in SIMD 5 (the least deprived zone) were less likely to have a borderline or abnormal total difficulties score (at 26%) than those in SIMD 1 (the most deprived zone) (at 34%).

The proportion of all pupils with a borderline or abnormal difficulties score has increased slightly between 2006 and 2015 (from 27% in 2006 to 31% in 2015). However, the increase was slightly greater among those in SIMD 5 (from 20% in 2006 to 26% in 2015) than those in SIMD 1 (from 30% in 2006 to 34% in 2015). This suggests that the gap between pupils living in the most and least deprived areas has closed over time.

Figure 3.1: Total difficulties score, by SIMD (2015)

Figure 3.1: Total difficulties score, by SIMD (2015)

Base: SIMD 1 (3,663), SIMD 2 (4,588), SIMD 3 (3,610), SIMD 4 (5,298), SIMD 5 (4,470)

Among 15 year old boys, the gap between the proportion of those in SIMD 1 and SIMD 5 with a borderline or abnormal total difficulties score has also closed over time. In 2006, 25% of 15 year old boys in SIMD 1 had a borderline or abnormal total difficulties score, compared with 16% of those in SIMD 5, whereas in 2015, 30% of 15 year old boys in SIMD 1 had a borderline or abnormal total difficulties score, compared with 25% of those in SIMD 5 (Figure 3.2).

Figure 3.2: Total difficulties score within each SIMD for 15 year old boys (% borderline/abnormal) (2006-2015)

Figure 3.2: Total difficulties score within each SIMD for 15 year old boys (% borderline/abnormal) (2006-2015)

Base: See Appendix A

Among 15 year old girls, the difference in the proportion of those in SIMD 1 and SIMD 5 with a borderline or abnormal total difficulties score also increased between 2006 and 2015. The proportion of 15 year old girls in SIMD 1 with a borderline or abnormal total difficulties score increased from 27% to 43%. However, the proportion those in SIMD 5 increased to a lesser extent from 23% to 32% (Figure 3.3).

Figure 3.3: Total difficulties score within each SIMD for 15 year old girls (% borderline/abnormal) (2006-2015)

Figure 3.3: Total difficulties score within each SIMD for 15 year old girls (% borderline/abnormal) (2006-2015)

Base: See Appendix A

Across the five SDQ scales, the relationship with deprivation varied. For example, there was no correlation between hyperactivity among 15 year old boys and SIMD. Of particular interest is that there was no correlation between emotional problems among 15 year old girls and SIMD. This means that emotional problems are affecting 15 year old girls regardless of SIMD ranking.

The conduct problems scale showed the most consistent relationship with SIMD. As figure 3.4 shows, 15 year olds living in the most deprived areas were considerably more likely to have a borderline or abnormal score on the conduct problems scale: 28% of 15 year olds living in SIMD 1 had a borderline or abnormal conduct problems score, compared with 20% of 15 year olds living in SIMD 5 (Figure 3.4).

Figure 3.4: Conduct problems SDQ scores within each SIMD for 15 year olds, 2015 (% borderline/abnormal)

Figure 3.4: Conduct problems SDQ scores within each SIMD for 15 year olds, 2015 (% borderline/abnormal)

Base: SIMD 1 (3,663), SIMD 2 (4,588), SIMD 3 (3,610), SIMD 4 (5,298), SIMD 5 (4,470)

WEMWBS and SIMD

While there is less scope to investigate the relationship between WEMWBS and SIMD given the lack of trend data and single scale, it is still important to explore.

SIMD showed a correlation with mental wellbeing. Among all subgroups, pupils in the least deprived areas had a higher WEMWBS mean score indicating better mental wellbeing than those in the most deprived areas. For example, among 13 year old boys, those living in SIMD 1 (the most deprived areas) had an average WEMWBS score of 49.9, compared with an average score of 52.6 among those living in SIMD 5 (the least deprived areas) (Figure 3.5).

Figure 3.5: Mean WEMWBS score by SIMD, by age and gender (2015)

Figure 3.5: Mean WEMWBS score by SIMD, by age and gender (2015)

Base: See Appendix A


Contact

Email: Julie Guy

Phone: 0300 244 4000 – Central Enquiry Unit

The Scottish Government
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