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Publication - Statistics Publication

Scottish Surveys Core Questions 2014

Published: 18 May 2016
ISBN:
9781786522610

Official statistics publication on equality groups across a range of measures from harmonised questions across the major SG population surveys.

103 page PDF

2.0MB

Contents
Scottish Surveys Core Questions 2014
Annex B: Comparison of the pooled surveys

Annex B: Comparison of the pooled surveys

In this section, key outcome variables are assessed across the three surveys to determine if there is broad agreement between the constituents of the SSCQ. Where the quoted confidence intervals overlap, we can assume that differences in the estimates are not statistically significant.

Estimates in these tables will be close to but may not be identical to figures published by the individual surveys. This is due to differences in the valid sample size and weights being applied before pooling (see section 11.1).

The three surveys and the pool broadly agree on the distribution of self-assessed health (Table B.1) and on the proportion of the adult population that smoke (Table B.2).

Respondents to the Scottish Health Survey ( SHeS) are somewhat more likely to say that they suffer from a long-term limiting health condition (Table B.3). Respondents are more likely to identify long-term conditions when asked about them in the context of an interview about numerous aspects of their health and wellbeing. A similar collection effect can be observed in mental wellbeing scores, where the average score given in SHeS is somewhat lower than that in the other two surveys (Table B.4).

Table B.1: Self-assessed general health by survey (row % and margin of error)

Very good

Good

Fair

Bad

Very Bad

SSCQ

35.2

± 0.8

38.9

± 0.8

18.6

± 0.6

5.5

± 0.4

1.6

± 0.2

SCJS

35.5

± 1.5

39.0

± 1.5

18.1

± 1.2

5.5

± 0.6

1.7

± 0.4

SHeS

32.2

± 1.8

41.1

± 1.9

18.4

± 1.4

6.2

± 0.8

2.1

± 0.5

SHS

36.1

± 1.2

38.2

± 1.2

19.1

± 0.9

5.2

± 0.5

1.4

± 0.2

Table B.2: Current smoker (row % and margin of error)

Yes

No

SSCQ

21.2

± 0.7

78.6

± 0.7

SCJS

22.0

± 1.3

77.9

± 1.3

SHeS

22.1

± 1.6

77.2

± 1.7

SHS

20.4

± 1.0

79.6

± 1.0

Table B.3: Long-term limiting health condition (row % and margin of error)

Limiting condition

No limiting condition

SSCQ

23.2

± 0.7

76.3

± 0.7

SCJS

18.3

± 1.1

81.2

± 1.1

SHeS

31.8

± 1.8

68.1

± 1.8

SHS

23.1

± 1.0

76.3

± 1.0

Table B.4: Average mental wellbeing score (scale from 7-35) and margin of error

Average

SSCQ

24.5

± 0.1

SCJS

25.1 ± 0.1

SHS

24.6 ± 0.1

SHeS

22.9 ± 0.1

The three surveys produce somewhat different estimates of the rate of provision of unpaid care, as shown in Table B.5. SCJS has the highest level, at 19.6%, followed by SHS at 17.2% and SHeS at 16%.The confidence intervals on estimates from SHS and SHeS overlap considerably and do represent a significant difference. SCJS is 2.4 points higher than SHS and the combined CIs are 2.2 points.

Table B.5: Provides unpaid care (row % and margin of error)

Yes

No

SSCQ

17.9

± 0.7

82.1

± 0.7

SCJS

19.6

± 1.2

80.4

± 1.2

SHeS

16.0

± 1.7

84.0

± 1.7

SHS

17.2

± 1.0

82.8

± 1.0

Respondents to the Scottish Crime and Justice Survey ( SCJS) are more likely to perceive a large increase in the crime rate of their local area and somewhat lower levels of confidence in the police overall (Tables B.5 & B.6).

Table B.6: Perception of local crime rate (row % and margin of error)

A lot more

A little more

About the same

A little less

A lot less

SSCQ

3.9

± 0.4

12.2

± 0.7

66.8

± 1.0

8.6

± 0.6

2.0

± 0.3

SCJS

5.7

± 0.8

13.8

± 1.3

61.8

± 1.7

10.0

± 1.1

3.0

± 0.6

SHeS

3.8

± 0.9

10.4

± 1.6

68.4

± 2.6

11.0

± 2.0

2.8

± 0.9

SHS

3.0

± 0.5

11.7

± 0.9

69.3

± 1.3

7.3

± 0.7

1.3

± 0.3

Table B.7: Confidence in the Police to… (row % and margin of error)

Very confident

Fairly confident

Not very confident

Not at all confident

A: Prevent crime

SSCQ

9.1

± 0.6

49.1

± 1.0

25.7

± 0.9

7.2

± 0.5

SCJS

8.8

± 1.0

48.2

± 1.7

28.4

± 1.5

8.6

± 0.9

SHeS

8.7

± 1.4

55.7

± 2.6

23.7

± 2.3

3.7

± 0.9

SHS

9.4

± 0.8

48.2

± 1.3

24.5

± 1.1

7.1

± 0.7

B: Respond quickly to appropriate calls and information from the public

SSCQ

16.6

± 0.7

49.7

± 1.0

18.0

± 0.7

6.6

± 0.5

SCJS

16.9

± 1.3

47.1

± 1.7

20.8

± 1.4

8.5

± 0.9

SHeS

15.0

± 1.8

55.4

± 2.6

17.6

± 2.0

3.6

± 0.9

SHS

16.6

± 1.0

50.0

± 1.3

16.4

± 1.0

6.1

± 0.6

C: Deal with incidents as they occur

SSCQ

13.9

± 0.7

54.0

± 1.0

18.0

± 0.7

5.3

± 0.4

SCJS

14.1

± 1.2

52.9

± 1.7

20.1

± 1.3

6.6

± 0.9

SHeS

13.9

± 1.8

59.0

± 2.6

16.5

± 1.9

3.4

± 1.1

SHS

13.8

± 0.9

53.7

± 1.3

17.0

± 1.0

5.0

± 0.5

D: Investigate incidents after they occur

SSCQ

14.7

± 0.7

55.6

± 1.0

15.8

± 0.7

4.4

± 0.4

SCJS

15.2

± 1.2

56.1

± 1.7

17.0

± 1.3

4.7

± 0.7

SHeS

13.7

± 1.8

61.3

± 2.6

13.8

± 1.8

2.9

± 0.8

SHS

14.5

± 0.9

54.2

± 1.3

15.5

± 1.0

4.6

± 0.5

E: Solve crimes

SSCQ

9.5

± 0.6

53.7

± 1.0

19.5

± 0.8

5.0

± 0.4

SCJS

8.1

± 0.9

54.6

± 1.7

21.1

± 1.4

4.9

± 0.7

SHeS

10.4

± 1.7

58.9

± 2.6

18.3

± 2.0

3.0

± 0.9

SHS

10.1

± 0.8

52.1

± 1.3

18.9

± 1.0

5.5

± 0.6

F: Catch criminals

SSCQ

8.9

± 0.6

52.7

± 1.0

21.2

± 0.8

5.8

± 0.4

SCJS

8.6

± 0.9

52.2

± 1.7

23.7

± 1.4

6.2

± 0.8

SHeS

8.5

± 1.5

56.9

± 2.7

21.7

± 2.2

3.4

± 0.9

SHS

9.1

± 0.8

52.1

± 1.3

19.5

± 1.0

6.0

± 0.6


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