beta

You're viewing our new website - find out more

Publication - Report

2018 national improvement framework and improvement plan

Published: 12 Dec 2017
Directorate:
Children and Families Directorate
Part of:
Education
ISBN:
9781788515085

The framework sets out activity the Scottish Government and partners will take to drive improvement for children and young people.

65 page PDF

2.4 MB

65 page PDF

2.4 MB

Contents
2018 national improvement framework and improvement plan
Annex A - Detailed evidence and improvement activity

65 page PDF

2.4 MB

Annex A - Detailed evidence and improvement activity

School leadership

Evidence we will gather

What is the available evidence telling us

Additional improvement activity needed/planned/ already underway

Lead

Local authority information on the quality of school leadership of change including the percentage self-evaluating as good or better for QI 1.3 Leadership of Change.

Local authorities reported that across Scotland the quality of leadership of change was self-evaluated as good or better in 75% of schools.

Education Scotland is committed to working with local authorities and schools through regional improvement collaboratives during 2017/18, and to continue to analyse inspection and other forms of local intelligence to improve school self-evaluation and build capacity for school leadership further.

ES

Data on the percentage of school inspections where QI 1.3 Leadership of Change is evaluated as 'good' or better.

HM Inspectors looked at the approaches and impact of collaborative leadership at all levels. They evaluated the pace of change to ensure it was having a positive impact for children and young people and the approach taken to ensure that the vision and values were clearly linked to the context of the establishment and its community.

Of the 120 schools across primary, secondary and special provision inspected as part of the sample for the National Improvement Framework between August 2016 and June 2017, m ost schools were evaluated as satisfactory or better (87%). The majority were evaluated as good, very good or excellent on 'leadership of change' (52%)

In many of the schools staff at all levels are taking on leadership roles. Schools are taking positive steps to increase their knowledge and understanding of the socio –economic profile of the school community and use this information to develop their vision, values and aims. In the most effective schools, collaborative working within schools and between schools and their partners is having a positive impact on learners. There is some progress in the way that staff are using data to inform their planning and practice.

In the secondary sector there is increasing use being made of socio-economic profile information to inform and influence the curriculum at the senior phase.

There is a need for similar improvements in use of data in the special schools sector. There is a need to continue to improve collaborative leadership at all levels and develop further the involvement of children and young people in the planning and implementation of change.

Further focus is required in the primary and special school sectors to monitor the impact of improvements and interventions on improving outcomes for children and young people.

The transfer of the functions of the Scottish College for Educational Leadership ( SCEL) to Education Scotland is now underway. Education Scotland will develop leadership programmes that help current and future leaders improve the quality of education.

Education Scotland will publish a young person's version of How Good is our School? to support learner participation in self-evaluation by April 2018.

Education Scotland will establish a young inspectors programme to help support improvement in learning by the end of 2018.

ES

Data on the number of headteachers and those in other posts, who have achieved the Standard for Headship through completing the Flexible Route to Headship, the Scottish Qualification for Headship programme, or the Into Headship programme since 2011.

An increased percentage of the teaching population have a qualification preparing them for headship roles.

The Standard for Headship asks leaders to apply their enhanced knowledge and understanding of research and developments in education policy to support their schools. Now that we can see more skills, knowledge and expertise within the headteacher cohort we need to ensure we use these to improve attainment.

Next Steps commits both SG and ES to developing the Headteachers Charter and to consulting on a proposed approach to the legislation to underpin this, in time for the introduction of an Education Bill by June 2018. Given commitment to bring forward the Charter, it will also be necessary to review the content of the Into Headship qualification.

SG/ ES

Data on the number of practitioners undertaking the Into Headship programme.

So far 504 teachers have either completed the programme or are currently undertaking it.

Next Steps commits SG/ ES to developing a mechanism by end of 2018 to identify aspirant headteachers early in their career and develop a programme of professional learning and work experiences to lead them to the Into Headship course – this will provide a fast-track leadership route for talented teachers providing a clear pathway to headship.

Development of a specific recruitment campaign for headteachers in spring 2018, building on the Teachers make People campaign.

SG/ ES

Data on the number of headteachers and others in local authority schools who are enquiring and engaging reflectively with the GTCS Standards for Leadership and Management and considering the impact of their professional learning in this area, as part of Professional Update processes.

The data tells us that many headteachers have a strong skill set that can be used more effectively within the system. The Standard for Headship asks leaders to apply their enhanced knowledge and understanding of contemporary developments in society and consider the implications for their leadership. This level of skills and knowledge can be harnessed to lead not just schools but system level change.

Next Steps commits SG/ ES to:-

Enhancing the leadership support package to build the capacity and culture for teachers and headteachers to take on their new more empowered roles. This is an ongoing commitment but one we have started working on from August 2017.

Developing by the end of 2018 new Executive Consultant Head and Cluster Leader roles with partners to strengthen school leadership.

Developing by the end of 2018 a new Systems Leadership role to provide clear progression opportunities and to strengthen educational leadership at all levels in the system.

The Standards, including Standard for Headship, are currently under review by GTCS. SG will work with GTCS to ensure that the revised Standard for Headship takes into account the headteachers Charter.

SG/ ES

Information on the range and quality of professional learning for leadership being undertaken by those in teacher, middle, school and system leadership roles.

In January 2017 SCEL launched a survey on the range and effectiveness of professional learning in leadership. Results suggested that perceived barriers to professional learning included time, finance and workload. Respondents also reported that professional learning in leadership is accessed from local authorities, universities and their own schools. Respondents also indicated they prefer to learn professional reading, practice based learning and self-directed learning.

Enhancing the leadership support package to build the capacity and culture for teachers and headteachers to take on their new more empowered roles. This is an ongoing commitment but one we have started working on from August 2017.

SG/ ES

Teacher professionalism

Evidence we will gather

What is the available evidence telling us

Additional improvement activity needed/planned/ already underway

Lead

Data on the number of teachers, since 2011, who have gained 60, 120 or 180 credits at SCQF Level 11 (including Chartered Teacher).

Year on year a greater proportion of the teaching profession have masters level qualifications. Since 2011 over 5,283 teachers have gained level 11 qualifications at either PG Certificate, PG Diploma or PG Degree level, a rise on over 2,000 from last year.

Evidence suggests a strong appetite for masters level learning amongst teachers which in time will lead to a profession with a wider skills base.

The intention remains to fund professional learning for teachers in this area including at school leadership level.

Next Steps confirms that SG will work with our partners and particularly the profession, to establish new career pathways for teachers allowing greater opportunities for development and progression into leadership, specialist or improvement roles. We started these discussions in September 2017.

SG

Data on the number of local authorities which are offering professional learning which has been benchmarked at SCQF level 11.

The data collected was not an effective indicator of the quality of professional learning on offer. That being the case, universities, GTCS and ES agreed the data collection had very limited value and should be stopped.

The Strategic Board for Teacher Education (membership includes ES, local authorities, universities, trade unions and the GTCS will continue to consider the quality of professional learning available to teachers.

SBTE

Data on the number of teachers, since 2011, who have been awarded Professional Recognition by the GTCS and the focus of their work to achieve this.

Since 2011, 2,569 teachers have gained Professional Recognition in a variety of subjects and topic areas. This year alone 864 teachers received Professional Recognition. This is indicative of the quality of the professional learning and teachers interest in this type of award. Evidence suggests a strong appetite for professional recognition amongst teachers which in time will lead to a profession with a wider skills base.

Number of programmes resulting in professional learning is steadily increasing.

Next Steps confirms that SG will work with our partners, and particularly the profession, to establish new career pathways for teachers allowing greater opportunities for development and progression into leadership, specialist or improvement roles. We started these discussions in September 2017.

We will continue to work with our partners, and particularly the profession, to establish new career pathways for teachers allowing greater opportunities for development and progression into leadership, specialist or improvement roles.

SG/ ES

Percentage of teachers in local authority and independent schools, within the annual cohort, having their professional learning successfully signed off by GTCS.

As of December 2017, 96.1% of the 2016/17 professional update cohort have had their professional understanding confirmed by their line manager and recorded by the GTCS. High level of engagement with the professional update process and with professional learning as a result.

Given the need to evidence that relevant standards are being met, teachers must have a choice of high-quality professional learning that is continually developed to meet changing needs.

We will streamline and enhance professional learning so that there is a coherent learning offer to teachers which is focused on curriculum area and sector specific issues. More professional learning will be provided by teachers, for teachers, through the regional improvement collaboratives.

This work is now underway and is being led by the Strategic Board for Teacher Education ( SBTE).

SBTE

Data on the views of newly qualified teachers, schools and local authorities on how well newly qualified teachers are prepared to teach literacy and numeracy, support children's health and wellbeing, use technology effectively to enhance learning and teaching and ensure equality.

This suggests the level of confidence amongst probationers in terms of key skills is mixed and that the majority of probationer teachers feel that they are confident in their knowledge and ability to teach literacy, numeracy and contribute to health and wellbeing to support pupil outcomes. Confidence in relation to equality appears to be more challenging than other areas.

Some early work being done by COSLA and GTCS to broaden evidence base.

We will take steps to ensure initial teacher education prepares students to enter the profession with consistently well-developed skills to teach areas such as literacy, numeracy and health and wellbeing – ongoing

Education Scotland to develop self-evaluation tools for ITE programmes in conjunction with GTCS and the universities. This tool will be available for use in the current academic year - by April 2018.

SG

Information on initial teacher education programmes coverage of literacy, numeracy, health and wellbeing and social justice.

This shows a wide variance in time spent on literacy, numeracy, health and wellbeing, equalities and data literacy across universities and programmes. It raises a question as to whether the level of variance is acceptable and whether steps should be taken in terms of course accreditation/quality assurance.

GTCS have strengthened accreditation procedures and are also reviewing the professional standards which, in time, are likely to require ITE courses to be amended.

We will take steps to ensure initial teacher education prepares students to enter the profession with consistently well-developed skills to teach areas such as literacy, numeracy and health and wellbeing.

With this in mind the Scottish Government has invited Education Scotland to develop self-evaluation tools for Initial Teacher Education ( ITE) programmes in conjunction with GTCS and the universities. This tool will be available for use in the current academic year - by April 2018.

We are exploring ambitious and innovative new routes into teaching, specifically for high-quality new graduates or those who are considering a career change.

SG/ ES

Data on the number of teachers in local authority schools who are enquiring and engaging reflectively with the GTCS Professional Standards and considering the impact of their professional learning, as part of Professional Update processes.

The GTCS found that the Standard for Career Long Professional Learning was used by most teachers and 79.9% of teachers reported they found this useful in guiding their professional learning. This, and other findings from the GTCS Professional Update evaluation report, indicate that teachers are engaging with the Standards and are finding them useful.

Next Steps confirms that SG will streamline and enhance professional learning so that there is a coherent learning offer to teachers which is focused on curriculum area and sector specific issues. More professional learning will be provided by teachers, for teachers, through the regional improvement collaboratives.

SG/ ES.

Evaluation of impact of Scottish Government investment in masters level learning.

Evaluation of professional learning will be considered by the Strategic Board for Teacher Education ( SBTE) going forward to ensure that investment in professional learning is evaluated appropriately in the round. We also expect regional improvement collaboratives to inform that process.

We believe that teachers engaging in masters level learning will gain valuable skills in terms of enquiry and research and in turn this will translate into stronger practice.

SG/

SBTE

Parental engagement

Evidence we will gather

What is the available evidence telling us

Additional improvement activity needed/planned/ already underway

Lead

Local authority information on work with partners to develop and deliver family learning opportunities.

Responses indicated that local authority schools are at varying levels of planning for family learning. There requires to be further understanding of the differences between parental engagement in children's learning and family learning to develop both effectively. Information provided by the Attainment Challenge authorities suggests they are making strong progress. Most authorities report that many of their schools are using Pupil Equity Funding to develop aspects of family learning.

Almost all authorities have well-established links with Community Learning and Development ( CLD) and most have development or strategic groups which include partners such as health, library services and, in some instances, the third sector. Many schools are using QI 2.5 Family Learning from How Good is Our School? 4 to evaluate their progress. The development of family learning is often cited as a priority within school improvement plans.

Support is required to assist local authorities and schools to measure the impact of family learning on outcomes for children, young people and their families.

Schools require continued support to extend their approaches to engaging families from parental engagement in learning, to also including family learning approaches.

Development of strategies is needed to improve partnership approaches which will improve availability and consistency for families accessing family learning programmes.

Publication of case studies on the National Improvement Hub to support the evaluation of family learning in each sector by March 2018.

National Family Learning Network Event by December 2017.

Framework for Family Learning to be published on National Improvement Hub by March 2018.

Early Learning and Childcare Quality Action Plan includes a commitment to increase support for evidence-based family learning to embed this in the early learning offer for families facing disadvantage.

Published in March 2017 an additional study relevant to the role of fathers in children's development and their engagement in school:
Growing Up in Scotland: Father-child relationships and child socio-emotional wellbeing

ES

From parents' pre-inspection questionnaires, the percentage of parents who are satisfied with their engagement and involvement with the school as indicated across a range of measures/questions [1] .

The following results are not representative of all parents across Scotland. 4,603 parents of pupils in primary, secondary, all-through and special schools completed the questionnaire between January and June 2017. This confirmed that:

  • 70% agreed that the school gave them advice on how to support their child's learning at home.
  • 50% agreed that the school organises activities where they and their child can learn together.
  • 59% agreed that the school takes their views into account when making changes.
  • 85% agreed that they felt comfortable approaching the school with questions, suggestions and/or a problem.
  • 78% agreed that they are kept informed about the work of the Parent Council and/or parent association.
  • 70% agreed that they felt encourage to be involved in the work of the Parent Council and/or parent association.
  • 80% agreed that they would recommend the school to other parents.
  • 83% agreed that they were satisfied with the school.

The main focus will be on improving the legislative and guidance framework underpinning parental involvement and engagement.

The forthcoming 2018 Education Bill will clarify definitions and key requirements, strengthening the duties on headteachers to involve and engage parents. There will be a requirement for every school to identify a teacher or professional with responsibility for promoting parental, family and community engagement. There will be a requirement that every school pursues the key principles of pupil participation.

In tandem with the strengthened legislative framework Education Scotland will:

  • work with local authorities and schools through regional improvement collaboratives during 2018/19, to help them further develop approaches to parental engagement and family learning.
  • update the Engaging with Parents and Families Toolkit for practitioners by March 2019.
  • support professional learning on parental engagement locally and regionally by March 2019.
  • continue to promote and share good practice in family learning and parental engagement through local and regional activity and practice sharing on the National Improvement Hub by March 2019.

Scottish Government will work with partners to ensure that by 2019 every school has access to a home to school link worker to support parents and families who find it challenging to engage in their child's learning and feel excluded from the work and life of their child's school.
A national Parental Engagement and Family Learning Action Plan by June 2018 that will contain detailed next steps in relation to provision of guidance, workforce support, access to family learning, digital and research across 3-18.

SG/ ES

From parents' pre-inspection questionnaires, the percentage of parents who are satisfied with their child's progress with learning, and the quality of reporting about their child's progress as indicated across a range of measures/questions.

  • 81% agreed that they receive helpful information about how their child is doing e.g. informal feedback, reports, learning profiles.
  • 76% agreed that the information they receive about how their child is doing reaches them at the right time.
  • 73% agreed that they understood how their child is assessed.
  • 81% agreed that their child receives the help they need to do well.

Through the regional improvement collaboratives, Education Scotland will provide advice and support staff to develop their understanding and use of a range of evidence, data and information to bring about improvements in the progress children and young people make in their learning.

SG/ ES

From the Scottish Household Survey, parental satisfaction rates.

  • The Scottish Household Survey asks adults (not only parents) how satisfied they are with a number of local services, including schools. The 2016 survey reports that:
  • 73% of adults were very or fairly satisfied with the quality of local schools in 2016.
  • The percentage of adults very or fairly satisfied with local schools has fallen over the last 5 years, from a high of 85% in 2011 to the current level of 73%.
  • 88% of adults who have used schools, i.e. those who have children in school, were very or fairly satisfied with the quality of local schools in 2016. Satisfaction of service users is also more stable over time than that of all adults.

Parents will be able to access an improved range of high-quality, easily accessible, school level data for parents by August 2018.

SG

In the 2017 Evidence Report only, pupil survey data from the Scottish Survey of Literacy and Numeracy on school and home.

Trend data (2011-2016) on parental engagement about learning at home confirmed a fairly stable picture over time in relation to:

  • Parents asking what children did at school
  • Helping with homework
  • Reinforcing the importance of working hard at school

The 2016 SSLN survey data (published 2017) confirmed that 26% of P4 children reported that their parents "hardly ever or never" read with them, indicating the need for further targeted advice and support in this area.

Key national parental information/support campaigns (PlayTalkRead, Read, Write, Count) will be repositioned within a newly refocused "Parent Club" approach, designed more closely around parent support with children's behaviour, practical support at home etc. This shift in approach will be implemented up to Dec 2018 and beyond.
Information and advice for parents on the annual data collection and the related messages on the importance of their role and supporting learning at home to be published on Parentzone Scotland website by March 2018.
As part of the legislative changes to the 2006 Parental Involvement Act ( due to be commenced 2019 at the earliest), there will be a new focus on schools' responsibilities to provide simple, practical advice on learning in the home.

SG/ ES

Data from IPSOS Mori research was produced as part of the National Parent Forum's review of the 2006 Parental Involvement Act.

The IPSOS Mori Research found:

  • Substantial variation between local authorities in terms of the ease with which parents and members of the public can access their strategies for parental involvement. All strategies followed the relevant best practice guidance but very few were up to date.
  • General satisfaction with type and level of communication from school. (More detailed findings in relation to preferred formats and timing from parents)
  • Parents of children in primary schools more likely to get involved in life/work of school than secondary. Events focused on learning and teaching not always taken up.
  • Most parents have limited knowledge of what learning at home means. Head teachers generally felt that schools need to improve in this area.
  • Awareness of Parent Councils is generally high. Mixed views on quality of Parent Councils' interaction with wider parent forum. Gender balanced Parent Councils remain uncommon. Difficulties in recruiting Parent Council members from more deprived backgrounds.

Practical guidance to schools and Parent Councils will be updated by 2019 to reflect an amended Parental Involvement Act. This is expected to include:

  • renewed focus on gender balance and equalities characteristics
  • practical advice on how to ensure a substantive focus on improvement by Parent Councils
  • practical advice on how to support engagement across the Parent Forum as a whole
  • clear definitions of family learning and learning in the home.

Scottish Government to work with the GTCS/Scottish Education Workforce Council to review and improve the Initial Teacher Education and Continuing Professional Development offer to headteachers in relation to parental engagement. Detailed commitments will be contained a National Action Plan on Parental Engagement and Family Learning by June 2018
Local authorities to update their engagement strategies to respond to the LA recommendations within the National Parent Forum's Review of Parental Involvement and to consider cross-authority regional improvement strategies.

SG/ ES

Assessment of children's progress

Evidence we will gather

What is the available evidence telling us

Additional improvement activity needed/planned/ already underway

Lead

Data from health visitor reviews (27-30 month).

More than one in four children from the most deprived areas (26%) had at least one developmental concern identified in the 27-30 month review compared to one in nine for the least deprived areas (11%).

Children from the most deprived areas in Scotland are more than twice as likely to have at least one developmental concern compared to those from the least deprived.

Children in the most deprived area in the 2015/16 review were over three times as likely to display a concern in any developmental domain compared to those in the least deprived area.

The percentage of children displaying at least one developmental concern has shown a slight reduction compared to the previous years for both the most deprived and least deprived areas. While there is a slight trend toward children in the most deprived areas showing fewer developmental concerns, the current data shows a clear existing disparity for those living in deprived areas.

Analysis undertaken for the Child Poverty Strategy identifies a few areas for consideration: living wage, numeracy levels for children, screen time, peer relationships, housing costs.
The Child Poverty Strategy – Measurement Framework outlines current activities and progress using the 3 P's approach: Pockets, Prospects & Places. The 2016 report highlights several key areas and relative performance of reaching these milestones.
Pockets – maximising financial resources of families on low incomes
Prospects – improved life chances of children in poverty
Places – children from low income households live in well designed, sustainable places.

The Child Poverty Strategy for Scotland 2014 is now in its third annual report; the improvement activities are centred around this strategy and the most recent (2016) report.

From April 2018, we will also draw upon the Care Inspectorate's inspections data to assess the extent to which graduate-level practitioners are improving outcomes for children.

From 2020, we will also draw upon two additional health visitor assessments at 13 months and at around 54 months.

From 2021, we anticipate a revised ELC census that will provide additional data on some of the drivers of children's outcomes. Work is ongoing in all of these data development areas. However, the main data gap is around health and wellbeing in the younger primary years.
Recent evidence, particularly from Growing Up in Scotland ( GUS), has highlighted the importance of quality to ensure better outcomes for children. It showed that the most important factor is that early learning and development is delivered by a profession that is dedicated to the care, learning and development of our youngest children. This is being drawn upon in taking forward actions from the ELC Quality Action Plan.
SG is carrying out an exercise to understand how information is currently shared and whether there are any existing barriers. As part of this, we will be identifying examples of good practice with a view to sharing these more widely.
We will also consider what action can be taken to address any variability in take up rates of the 27-30 month review across authorities.

SG

Data from all 32 local authorities on children and young people's achievement of Curriculum for Excellence levels in literacy and numeracy at P1, P4, P7 and S3.

The Scottish Survey of Literacy and Numeracy ( SSLN) 2016 literacy results found that performance remained strong in a number of key respects, although it declined slightly in some. There were performance gaps at some stages of broad general education linked to the gender and the levels of deprivation experienced by young people.

The Achievement of CfE Levels 2016/17 data collection confirms that:

At primary stages, the percentage of pupils achieving the expected CfE level is highest in P1 and slightly decreases throughout the stages:

  • P1 reading 80%, writing 77%, listening and talking 85%, numeracy 83%
  • P4 reading 77%, writing 71%, listening and talking 83%, numeracy 75%
  • P7 reading 76%, writing 69%, listening and talking 81%, numeracy 70%

At S3, the percentage of pupils achieving Third Level or better is high across all organisers:

  • Reading 90%, writing 89%, listening and talking 91%, numeracy 88%

Around half of S3 pupils have achieved Fourth Level in each organiser:

  • Reading 51%, writing 48%, listening and talking 51%, numeracy 56%

Improvement in literacy and numeracy attainment, particularly among those pupils that are vulnerable to poorer outcomes, remains the key priority of the Scottish Government.

A wide range of activity is underway across Scottish schools, supporting teachers to improve literacy and numeracy. Identifying and promoting good practice and innovation will be vital in further raising attainment, promoting excellence and equity and in appraising what makes a difference.

Parental involvement and enjoyment of literacy and numeracy is being promoted through the Read, Write, Count initiative, the First Minister's Reading Challenge, Maths Week, and the Deputy First Minister's Holiday Maths Challenge.

Consideration of options for driving improvements in literacy and numeracy has been included in the draft work plan of the Curriculum and Assessment Board.

SG

Data from a range of surveys on health and wellbeing showing changes over time.

Behaviour in Scottish Schools Research ( BISSR) 2016 is the latest in a series of research projects, and builds on research carried out in 2012, 2009 and 2006. The overall aim of the research is to provide a clear and robust picture of relationships and behaviour in publically funded mainstream schools; current policy and practice in promoting positive relationships and behaviour; and behaviour management approaches that are used in schools.

BISSR 2016 has been signed off by members of the Scottish Advisory Group on Relationships and Behaviour in Schools ( SAGRABIS) and the final report was published on 12 December 2017. Scottish Government and SAGRABIS will issue a joint response to the report's findings which sets out priority actions for local authorities, schools, Scottish Government and SAGRABIS members to undertake.

Education Scotland are currently undertaking a review of Personal and Social Education in schools. The review commenced in July 2017 and is split into 3 phases. Phase 1 – a literature review of guidance available to teachers – was completed in August 2017. Phase 2 commenced in October 2017 and is expected to be complete by spring 2018. Phase 3 – which analyses findings and develops recommendations is expected to commence in June 2018. It is expected that the overall review will be completed by the end of 2018.

SG/ ES

Data on the senior phase qualifications and awards obtained by school leavers.

Higher passes have exceeded 150,000 for the third year in a row. Results included in excess of 50,000 skills-based awards and achievements (based on August 2017 data [2] ).

There is a greater rate of increase in the proportion of young people attaining 1 or more qualifications [3] at SCQF levels 4, 5 and 6 in the most deprived SIMD areas than in the least deprived.

In 2015/16, 10.7% of school leavers left with one or more vocational qualifications [4] at SCQF level 5 or better, compared with 9.0% in 2014/15 and 7.3% in 2013/14. During 2015/16 the percentage of school leavers attaining vocational qualifications also increased at SCQF levels 2 to 7.

The 15-24 Learner Journey Review has been underway throughout 2017, looking at how to make young people's learning from 15-24 more relevant, coherent and effective. The outcomes from Stage 1 of the review will be published in 2018, with options for future implementation.

Continue to support use of the Insight senior phase benchmarking tool at local level to secure improvements in learner outcomes through the provision of ongoing training and support from the Insight Professional Adviser Team and newly established network of local authority Insight leads – ongoing.

SG

Data on school leaver destinations, including participation in learning, training and work.

The participation measure ( PM) data tells us the learning, training and employment status of 16-19 year olds. This is used to understand what activities individuals progress on to when they have completed a course of learning, training or a period of employment.

The data is telling us that the learning and training system works well for the majority of 16-19 year olds, however, particular groups still do not successfully progress through learning and training and in to work. Local authorities, Skills Development Scotland ( SDS) and colleges using the data that underpins the PM to identify individuals who need help to sustain or access learning, training or employability support. Scottish Government will consider the findings of this analysis and identify whether there are policy implications.

Two significant areas of development are underway. The first is to improve the data set by including employment data. Scottish Government and SDS are working with HMRC to develop solutions that will allow individual level employment data to be shared to support service delivery and service reform. The aim is to have these arrangements in place by Autumn 2018.

The second is ongoing capacity building with partners who access the data set to help them understand the breadth of information available, how to best interrogate it and how to use it to challenge service delivery and planning. SDS is leading on this work with local authorities and colleges with support from the Scottish Government.

SG, SDS, LAs, colleges and the SFC.

Data on the percentage of school inspections where QI 3.1: Ensuring wellbeing, quality and inclusion is graded as good or better.

HM Inspectors evaluated the impact of the service's approach to wellbeing, equality and inclusion which underpins children and young people's ability to achieve success. There is a focus on how positive learners and staff feel and how well they are listened to and how effectively legislative duties are understood and met.
Of the 120 schools across primary, secondary and special provision inspected as part of the sample for the National Improvement Framework between August 2016 and June 2017, almost all schools were evaluated as satisfactory or better (91%). The majority were evaluated as good, very good or excellent (68%) on 'ensuring wellbeing, equality and inclusion'.
Across schools, staff continue to have positive relationships with children and young people and they are increasing their use of wellbeing indicators.
Children and young people have an increasing voice and feel included in decision-making. Positive progress is being made in how schools identify barriers to learning.
There now needs to be an increased focus on ensuring the impact of interventions on improving outcomes for children and young people and a more strategic approach to improving their wellbeing.

Education Scotland will work with regional improvement collaboratives to support leaders and practitioners to identify and use effective learning, teaching and assessment strategies which promote inclusive practices, improve achievement and raise attainment aligned with regional improvement plans.

ES working with RICs

Through Education Scotland's external review of careers information, advice and guidance services, percentages of these services graded as 'good' or better for the quality element 1.1: How effective are service providers at achieving and maintaining high levels of service delivery?

Of the 5 Careers Information , Advice and Guidance ( CIAG) inspections carried out between August 2016 and June 2017, 100% were graded as good or better against 'Customer progression and achievement of relevant high quality outcomes'. Data shows that local authority secondary schools are working with SDS careers staff through the School Partnership Agreement, and other activities, to help improve the participation measure in schools and the positive destinations for young people.

To ensure further improvement in levels of service delivery, SDS is:

  • working with schools and authorities to improve the participation measure; and
  • engaging in activities to include learners with additional support needs, disengaged learners and mainstream learners in all services.

ES

Local authority self-evaluation data on the effectiveness of moderation of teachers' professional judgement of Curriculum for Excellence levels in literacy and numeracy.

Evidence from the majority of local authorities suggests that teachers are becoming increasingly more confident about making judgements of a CfE level. Learning from the Quality Assurance and Moderation Support Officer programme is being used in a variety of ways across almost all authorities to support teachers to better understand the CfE benchmarks and develop a consistent approach to moderation. Education Scotland's Moderation hub is beginning to be used to improve the consistency of evaluations further. Authorities that use standardised assessments use them well to provide additional assessment information to support teachers' professional judgements. Overall, moderation continues to be a focus across all authorities. However, there is a growing confidence that the processes being developed are leading to greater consistency of teachers' judgements of CfE levels in literacy and numeracy, particularly in primary schools. There remains the need for continuing support.

Education Scotland will continue to provide support to improve the consistency and effectiveness of moderation of teachers' professional judgement further across the country.

ES working with RICs

School inspection data on the effectiveness of moderation of teachers' professional judgement of Curriculum for Excellence levels in literacy and numeracy.

In September 2016, Education Scotland commenced a new model of inspection in primary and secondary schools, using new Quality Indicators ( QI). Evaluation of the process of moderation is gathered within learning, teaching and assessment. Evaluation of the impact of moderation is gathered within raising attainment and achievement. This evidence is detailed in the National Improvement Framework evidence report published in December 2017.

Education Scotland will continue to provide support to improve further the consistency and effectiveness of moderation of teachers' professional judgement across the country.

ES

Additional Evidence to Be Incorporated Into NIF in Future Years

Evidence we will gather

What it will tell us

Additional improvement activity needed/planned/ already underway

Lead

Scottish Funding Council National Measure 2(c) - Volume and Proportion of Credits, delivered to learners at S3 and above as part of school.

This will tell us if we are increasing opportunities for young people in the senior phase to study vocational qualifications in college.

Three Developing the Young Workforce ( DYW) Regional events for Directors of Education and College Principals are being delivered jointly by SFC and SG in order to consider barriers to growing school college vocational pathways. The outcome of these events will determine next steps, to include consideration of any additional measurements required.

The Outcome Agreement process has been intensified, ensuring expectation of greater collaboration within regional partnerships and a step change in provision of vocational programmes in the senior phase. Expansion will be captured under current SFC measurements.

SG/

SFC

Evidence of the number of employers engaged with education (ranging from single engagements through to strategic partnerships) to support young people of all ages to understand career opportunities, and develop skills for work (including career advice, work inspiration, work experience etc).

This will tell us whether we have been successful in exposing young people to employers while still at school with activities designed to improve their educational attainment and/or employment outcomes.

A network of 21 Regional DYW Groups have been established to bridge the gap between employers and education. This network also links with the network of DYW local authority leads.

A formative evaluation of 4 of these Regional DYW groups will be undertaken in 2017/18 to support the continuous improvement of the network, providing recommendations for areas of improvement across all Regional Groups, including driving and measuring performance and creating efficiencies.

SG

School improvement

Evidence we will gather

What is the available evidence telling us

Additional improvement activity needed/planned/ already underway

Lead

Data on the percentage of school inspections where QI 2.3: learning, teaching and assessment is graded as good or better.

Evidence in Education Scotland's Quality and Improvement in Scottish Education report highlighted that the quality of learning and teaching was too variable. As part of inspections from August 2016 HM Inspectors evaluated a new quality indicator: 'Learning, Teaching and Assessment'. They evaluated the extent to which all children and young people experienced consistently high-quality learning. HM Inspectors had an increased focus on the effectiveness of assessment approaches, including shared expectations of standards and arrangements for moderation across stages and the curriculum.
Of the 120 schools across primary, secondary and special provision inspected as part of the sample for the National Improvement Framework between August 2016 and June 2017, almost all were evaluated as satisfactory or better (96%). The majority (52%) of them were evaluated as good, very good or excellent on 'learning, teaching and assessment.'
Children and young people continue to be engaged and motivated in their learning. Overall, there remains variability in the quality of learning children and young people experience. There is still scope for them to be more engaged in planning and developing their learning.
Schools are taking positive steps to improve approaches to using a range of assessments. Schools are beginning to engage in moderation activities to help share the standard of expectations. More needs to be done to improve the effective use of assessment as an integral part of planning learning and teaching. While there is progress in working in partnership with other services, business and agencies to enrich learners experiences, more needs to be done to ensure that learning across settings is coherent.

Education Scotland will support leaders and practitioners to develop their skills in providing professional learning for others through the regional improvement collaboratives which is focused on learning, teaching and assessment in and across curriculum areas and sectors.

Education Scotland will promote collaborative practitioner enquiry in and across services and regions to support leaders and practitioners to drive innovation and improvement in learning and teaching.

Professional learning materials for schools linked to improving learning, teaching and assessment are planned for inclusion on the National Improvement Hub by the end of March 2018.

ES

Data on the percentage of school inspections where QI 3.2: raising attainment and achievement is graded good or better.

HM Inspectors evaluated the school's success in achieving the best possible outcomes for all children and young people. This focused on children and young people's attainment across all areas of the curriculum and the service's ability to demonstrate improvements in children and young people's achievements in relation to skills and attributes.

Of the 120 schools across primary, secondary and special provision inspected as part of the sample for the National Improvement Framework between August 2016 and June 2017, almost all schools were evaluated as satisfactory or better (92%) and around half were evaluated as good, very good or excellent (49%).

Overall, children and young people's attainment and achievement continues to be too variable. School staff have an increased focus around data and the identification of 'gaps' in attainment and achievement.

In most sectors this data is increasingly well used by senior staff to develop strategies. There is a need for more consistent use of tracking and monitoring of children and young people's learning to improve attainment and achievement.

Education Scotland is committed to working with local authorities and schools through regional improvement collaboratives during 2017/18, to help them further develop the use of data to continually raise attainment and achievement and close the poverty-related attainment gap.

ES

Level of attendance and number of exclusions per school.

93.3% was the total attendance rate recorded for 2016/17. This is very similar to previous years. The attendance rate was higher for primary schools (94.9%) than secondary schools (91.2%) and special schools (90.3%).
Children and young people living in the 20% most deprived areas had an attendance rate that was 6.6 percentage points lower than the pupils living in the 20% least deprived areas.

The exclusion rate for all pupils in 2016/17 was 26.8 per 1,000 pupils. This has been falling year on year since 2006/07. Rates of exclusions per 1,000 pupils for pupils living in the 20% most deprived areas were 48.5 per 1,000 pupils compared with 9.1 per 1,000 pupils living in the 20% least deprived areas.

We refreshed and released updated guidance on managing school exclusions 'Included, Engaged and Involved Part 2' in June 2017. We plan to undertake a review of 'Included, Engaged and Involved Part 1' in January 2018, with the aim of publishing findings by October 2018.

SG/ ES

The percentage of schools which self-evaluate as good or better for Q.I. 2.3 – learning, teaching and assessment and Q.I. 3.2 – raising attainment and achievement; and for progress with the priorities set out in the NIF.

Local authorities reported that across Scotland the quality of learning, teaching and assessment was self-evaluated by schools as good or better in 74% of all schools.

Local authorities reported that across Scotland the quality of raising attainment and achievement was self-evaluated by schools as good or better in 70% of all schools.

Education Scotland is committed to working with local authorities and schools through regional improvement collaboratives during 2017/18 to improve school self-evaluation further and continue to build capacity for improvement in these areas.

ES

Local authority information on their capacity and impact on improvement in learning, teaching and assessment, and raising attainment and achievement; and their progress with the priorities set out in the NIF as good or better.

Self-evaluation evidence from almost all authorities suggests that there is a strong capacity to continue to make progress with the NIF priorities.
A few local authorities provided evidence that a shortage of teaching staff presents problems in supporting improvement. Authorities have identified their poverty-related attainment gaps but they are at various stages in tracking and monitoring how well the gaps are closing.

Most authorities can demonstrate improvement in closing the poverty-related attainment gap in literacy and numeracy. However, in most cases, the pace of progress is too slow. Getting It Right for Every Child continues to be the key driver behind improving health and wellbeing.

Authorities report that partnership working is increasing as schools recognise that they are not able to mitigate fully the impact of deprivation by themselves.

There is an increased emphasis on careers in the broad general education and increasing partnership working to provide appropriate positive destinations.

Secondary schools continue to look for ways to develop vocational pathways but progress in this area is inconsistent. Most authorities provided evidence of how SAC and/ or PEF funding is supporting or beginning to support improved professional learning for teachers and improved learning for children and young people. Almost all authorities have developed their Standards and Qualities reporting to reflect the NIF priorities.

Education Scotland is committed to working with local authorities and schools through regional improvement collaboratives during 2017/18, to continue to improve the capacity of staff to self-evaluate for improvement.

Education Scotland will continue to support the effective use of funding to raise attainment and close the poverty-related attainment gap.

ES

The percentage of primary schools which are using technology to support effective learning and teaching across the curriculum, as indicated through the Digital Schools Award Scotland Framework.

Launched in September 2016, to date 415 primary schools have registered with 43 of them having achieved the award.

A secondary framework was launched in September 2017. To date 77 secondary schools have registered with 1 having achieved the award already.

We will obtain a detailed report from the framework which will provide an insight into progress for those schools registered as well as the areas in which schools are having difficulty and require further support. This will be used to influence the Digital Learning and Teaching programme for 2018/19.

SG

Number of registrations for funded early learning and childcare.

Based on the 2016 summary statistics for Scotland, there is a large disparity for uptake rates between eligible 2 year olds and 3 & 4 year olds. While an estimated 99% of 3 & 4 year olds registered for local authority funded ELC in 2016 (97% in 2015), only 9% of 2 year olds were registered (7% in 2015). This represents around 35% of the eligible population.

We commissioned research to look at the barriers to uptake for 2 year olds.

The research, which was conducted by Ipsos MORI and published in early 2017, suggested that the main barrier to uptake was awareness of the entitlement.

As part of the Early Learning and Childcare Expansion Blueprint Action Plan for 2017-18 we committed to providing dedicated support to local authorities to assist them in improving uptake amongst eligible 2 year olds.

We are also exploring options through UK legislation to enable the sharing of data by DWP and HMRC to allow local authorities to identify eligible families. This should assist with increasing registrations of 2 year olds. .

SG

Performance Information

Evidence we will gather

What is the available evidence telling us

Additional improvement activity needed/planned/ already underway

Lead

Data from each of the key drivers.

Refer to NIF Evidence Report

SG

Progress towards achieving the priorities set within the Framework, drawing on all the evidence gathered.

Refer to NIF Evidence Report

SG

Information on initial teacher education programmes coverage of data literacy.

Covered as part of the content analysis of ITE published in May 2017. This shows a wide variance in time spent on data literacy across and programmes. It raises a question as to whether the level of variance is acceptable and whether steps should be taken in terms of course accreditation/quality assurance.

We will take steps to ensure initial teacher education prepares students to enter the profession with consistently well-developed skills to teach areas such as data literacy. Education Scotland are developing a self-evaluation framework for universities to use. This will highlight effective practice and be available in 2017/18.

SG

Data on the views of newly qualified teachers, schools and local authorities on how effectively newly qualified teachers use data to enhance learning and teaching.

The findings suggests the level of confidence amongst probationers in terms of data literacy is mixed.

As above

SG


Contact