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Publication - Consultation Paper

Consultation on mobile traders food hygiene national standards

Published: 27 Jul 2015

Consultation on mobile traders food hygiene national standards, following complaints from business about inconsistency.

40 page PDF

906.8kB

40 page PDF

906.8kB

Contents
Consultation on mobile traders food hygiene national standards
Annex A

40 page PDF

906.8kB

Annex A

Mobile Traders Food Hygiene National Standards

Introduction

This document only relates to mobile food units where the operation of such requires a street trader’s licence under the Civic Government (Scotland Act) 1982 (as amended).

For the purposes of this document, the term “mobile traders” includes mobile premises, kiosks, stalls, vehicles, trailers and other such premises. All such categories shall henceforth be referred to within this document as “mobile food units”.

Notification of the Food Authority [Registration]

The food business operator must ensure that the Food Authority in which the mobile food unit is normally based (even when not trading) is notified of the existence of that food business. The information duly requested must be provided by the food business operator in order to enable relevant details to be entered on the register of food premises held by the Food Authority.

Any other premises used for preparation of food which is to be sold from a mobile food unit must be registered as such by the Food Authority within which it is located.

Street Trader’s Licence

In order for a person to obtain a street trader’s licence under Section 39 of the Civic Government (Scotland) Act 1982, the mobile food unit operated by that person must be subject of a valid Certificate of Compliance from a Food Authority.

A copy of the current street trader’s licence must be displayed on the mobile food unit and any identification badge worn as required.

Certificate of Compliance

In order to obtain a Certificate of Compliance under Section 39 of the Civic Government (Scotland) Act 1982, the mobile food unit must be inspected by the Food Authority which has registered that food business/mobile food unit.

If the trader/unit is not registered in Scotland, the inspection and issue of a Certificate of Compliance must be undertaken by the Scottish Food Authority in which the application for a street trader’s licence is made, or another authority to which an application for a street trader’s licence in respect of this activity is or has been made.

Period of validity

Any Certificate of Compliance so granted will be valid for the period determined by the Category to which the Unit is deemed to belong, as set out below.

  • Category 1 Units – Certificate of Compliance must be renewed every 3 years
  • Category 2, 3 and 4 Units – Certificate of Compliance must be renewed every year

Inspection for a Certificate of Compliance and issue of certificate does not preclude the subsequent inspection of the mobile food unit by any Food Authority while the unit is trading within its jurisdiction.

Structural and operational requirements

These standards cover both structural and operational requirements for mobile food units. The standard text represents structural aspects which shall be considered as core requirements for the assessment for a Certificate of Compliance. The text in the shaded boxes relates to operational matters which can only be assessed during normal trading.

Mobile Traders Food Hygiene National Standards

General Food Hygiene Requirements

Note. The standard text represents structural aspects which shall be considered as core requirements for the assessment for a Certificate of Compliance. The text in the shaded boxes relates to operational matters which can only be assessed during normal trading.

1.0 WATER SUPPLY

Legal References:

EC Regulation 852/2004, Article 4(2) and Annex II, Chapter III, (2)(c)(d)(e)&(f)

EC Regulation 852/2004, Article 4(2) and Annex II, Chapter VII, (1)

EC Regulation 852/2004, Article 4(2) and Annex II, Chapter VII, (4)

1.1 General

1.1.1 Mobile food units must be provided with an adequate, piped supply of hot and cold water or warm water at a suitably controlled temperature.

1.1.2 All water supplied to hand, equipment and food washing facilities must be potable water.

1.1.3 Potable water must be used:

  • for cleaning food;
  • for cleaning surfaces which may come into contact with food;
  • for cleaning hands;
  • for using as an ingredient in food and drinks;
  • for cooking of food;
  • any other operations where there is a risk of contaminating foodstuffs.

1.1.4 Ideally, mains water or a private supply should be used. Where there is no direct connection to a suitable supply, containers may be used. This water must be potable.

1.1.5 A “piped supply” includes the use of a tap mechanism that delivers hot and cold water independently or provides warm water via a mixer tap that is manually (or sensor) controlled.

1.1.6 The supply must be from a tap or taps at adequate pressure and temperature.

1.1.7 The supply must provide a sufficient volume of water, by capacity or means, for the trading hours.

1.1.8 Containers used for holding water and any associated pipe work must be:

  • made of food grade materials and be enclosed;
  • kept clean and disinfected frequently to avoid the risk of contamination;
  • readily identifiable as being for water use only and visibly different from any containers used for receipt and storage of waste water;
  • disinfected using chemicals which satisfy either BS EN 1276 or BS EN 13697;
  • emptied and refilled regularly so as to avoid unacceptable contamination by micro-organisms;
  • of sufficient capacity to store enough water for the business’ potable water needs.

1.2 Hot water

1.2.1 The pipe work must be fixed and deliver the water supply directly to all sinks. The practice of using jugs etc. to transfer water from an urn to the sink is not acceptable.

1.2.2 Where services are readily available, a constant piped supply or an instantaneous water heater (gas/electric) can be used. Alternatively, insulated containers for hot water storage would be acceptable provided they are of suitable capacity and capable of storing the water at an adequate temperature and deliver water to the sink(s) via fixed pipe work.

1.3 Ice

1.3.1 Any ice that will come into contact with food and drink must be made from potable water.

1.3.2 Ice machines must be regularly cleaned as must containers and utensils used to store and dispense ice. Parts of the ice machine and utensils which come into contact with ice must be disinfected at intervals.

1.3.3 Utensils must be made from durable materials that will not present a foreign body hazard.

1.3.4 Utensils used to dispense ice must be stored in suitable containers, and not inside the ice machine or other surfaces.

2.0 WASH BASINS

Legal References:

EC Regulation 852/2004, Article 4(2) and Annex II, Chapter III, (2)(a)

2.1 Wash Basin Provision

2.1.1 All units must be provided with a wash basin for the purpose of maintaining personal hygiene.

2.1.2 The wash basin must be located in an accessible position.

2.1.3 A suitable and sufficient supply of liquid soap and single-use paper towels for hand-drying must be provided.

2.1.4 The wash basin must be provided with an adequate, piped supply of hot and cold water or warm water at a suitably controlled temperature.

2.1.5 The pipe work must be fixed and deliver the water supply directly to the wash basin. The practice of using jugs etc. to transfer water to the basin is not acceptable.

2.1.6 Waste water from the wash basin must be piped to a suitable closed container which is readily identifiable as being designated for that purpose. Alternatively, it could be clearly marked ‘Waste Water’. (See Section 9 – Waste)

3.0 SINKS

Legal References:

EC Regulation 852/2004, Article 4(2) and Annex II, Chapter III, (2)(c)

3.1 Sink Provision

3.1.1 Sinks must be located in an accessible position.

3.1.2 The requirement for sinks is in addition to wash basins. The provision of a sink or sinks is for the washing of food and the cleaning and disinfecting of work tools and equipment and is not for the washing of hands.

3.1.3 Sinks must be of sufficient size to accommodate all equipment that requires to be washed during trading.

3.1.4 The minimum provision for sinks in each Unit Category is as listed in 3.1.5 below. Categories 1 to 4 are defined in Annex 2.

3.1.5

  • Category 1 Unit - No sink required
  • Category 2 Unit – Minimum of 1 Sink Required

A sink will not be required in a Category 2 Unit in the following circumstances:

- Where food is only served and not prepared; and

- Where there is an adequate provision of multiple/duplicate items of equipment, e.g. knives, spoons, tongs etc; and

- Where adequate alternative arrangements have been made for the cleaning and disinfection of non-replaceable food contact surfaces in the event of spillage or other contamination.

  • Category 3 Unit – Minimum of 1 Sink plus Sterilising Unit required (See also Section 16)

One sink as detailed above plus a 3-compartment unit for cleaning, sterilising and rinsing scoops.

  • Category 4 Unit - 2 Sinks required (positioned adjacent to one another)

Where no sink is provided and ready-to-eat food is sold, e.g. fruit, signage is required to advise customers that such items must be washed prior to consumption.

4.0 EQUIPMENT

Legal References:

EC Regulation 852/2004, Article 4(2) and Annex II, Chapter III, (2)(b)

EC Regulation 852/2004, Article 4(2) and Annex II, Chapter V(1)(a)(c&(d)

4.1 Equipment Standard – Installation and Maintenance

4.1.1 Food equipment, work surfaces and fittings must be constructed using smooth surfaces that allow effective cleaning/disinfection.

4.1.2 All internal surfaces must be constructed and/or finished with washable materials.

4.1.3 Food equipment, work surfaces and fittings must be installed so that they allow access for cleaning or they must be capable of being moved or dismantled to allow such access.

4.1.4 Walls immediately behind and adjacent to food preparation surfaces and equipment must be capable of being cleaned and, in high risk food areas, disinfected.

4.1.5 Tables, work surfaces, food display cabinets, counters, equipment, utensils and display containers must be in good repair in order to be easy to clean and must be kept clean and maintained in good condition at all times. Surfaces coming into direct contact with food or are in such close proximity that they could contaminate the food if dirty must be capable of being disinfected and should be duly disinfected as appropriate.

5.0 CLEANING AND DISINFECTION

Legal References:

EC Regulation 852/2004, Article 4(2) and Annex II, Chapter III, (2)(c)

EC Regulation 852/2004, Article 4(2) and Annex II, Chapter V(1)(a)

EC Regulation 852/2004, Article 5

5.1 Cleaning and Disinfection - General

5.1.1 All equipment and areas within the unit require to be kept clean.

5.1.2 All surfaces in the unit which come in to contact or are liable to come in to contact with food must be cleaned and disinfected at a suitable frequency.

5.1.3 Where both cleaning and disinfection are considered necessary, the process must be conducted in 2 stages – i.e. clean and then disinfect.

  • Clean – Remove excess waste, wash with hot water and detergent; and
  • Disinfect – Disinfect with clean water and an appropriate food safe disinfectant.

5.2 Cleaning and Disinfection – Using Sinks

5.2.1 Where equipment is to be cleaned and disinfected in a sink (or sinks), a 2-stage process must be used regardless of the number of sinks available. The overall process must be (or equivalent to) the following:

  • Pre-clean – remove leftover food and residues;
  • Main Clean – wash in the sink with clean hot water and the correct amount of detergent;
  • Rinse – if required;
  • Disinfect – in the sink with clean water and an appropriate food safe disinfectant, for the required contact time;
  • Second Rinse – (if required) in the sink with clean water;
  • Dry – ideally using single-use drying cloths.

5.3 Cleaning and Disinfection – Cleaning In Place

5.3.1 Where equipment such as surfaces, worktops etc cannot be washed in a sink, they may be cleaned and disinfected “in place”. As with sink washing, this process must include the stages of cleaning followed by disinfection and should be as follows:

  • Pre-clean – remove loose debris;
  • Main Clean – clean the surface using hot water and the correct amount of detergent;
  • Disinfect – treat with a food safe disinfectant spray;
  • Dry – ideally air dry.

5.4 Cleaning and Disinfection – Prevention of Cross Contamination

5.4.1 Where both unwrapped raw and ready-to-eat foods are handled within the unit, the processes referred to at 5.2 and 5.3 above must be conducted using a disinfectant which meets either BS EN 1276 or BS EN 13697.

5.4.2 “Raw Foods” include:

  • Raw Meate.g. beef, pork, lamb, chicken, turkey and game;
  • Raw Meat Productse.g. sausages, burgers etc;
  • Other raw foodse.g. fish, shellfish, eggs;
  • Vegetables and fruit – i.e. those that have not been labelled as ready-to-eat and especially vegetables that are visibly dirty.

5.4.3 Where both unwrapped raw and ready-to-eat foods are handled, any equipment or utensils used with either must be cleaned and disinfected separately. For example, raw food utensils must be cleaned and disinfected separately from utensils used for ready-to-eat foods.

The only exception to this would be where such equipment is washed in a dishwasher (See 5.4.4 below).

5.4.4 Equipment and utensils which come into contact with raw food must not be used for ready-to-eat food unless they are cleaned in a dishwasher which is maintained and used in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions. The dishwasher must be capable of achieving a temperature which is high enough to disinfect the equipment.

5.5 Cleaning Schedule

5.5.1 The disinfection process must be detailed within a Food Safety Management System for the business. A documented cleaning schedule must be devised, detailing the frequency and method of cleaning and disinfection. Any chemicals used must be specified along with relevant dilution rates. (See Section 14 – Food Safety Management System)

6.0 PERSONAL HYGIENE

Legal References:

EC Regulation 852/2004, Article 4(2) and Annex II, Chapter III, (2)(a)

EC Regulation 852/2004, Article 4(2) and Annex II, Chapter VIII

6.1 General Personal Hygiene

6.1.1 All staff must observe good personal hygiene and refrain from unhygienic habits and practices which may expose food to the risk of contamination.

  • Wash hands regularly, particularly:

- after going to the toilet

- before starting work

- before handling food

- after handling raw food and raw food packaging

- after touching bins or handling waste

- after every break

- after eating and drinking

- after cleaning

- after blowing your nose

- after sneezing/coughing

  • Do not eat, drink or chew gum where open food is handled.
  • Cover any spots, skin cuts and abrasions (on exposed areas such as hands or lower arms) with waterproof dressings.
  • Do not wear jewellery, nail varnish or false nails which may present a risk of contamination. As well as physically contaminating food itself, jewellery can harbour dirt and bacteria.

6.2 Hand Washing

6.2.1 Effective hand washing must follow an appropriate technique. The technique used must include the following:

  • Wetting of hands prior to applying soap
  • A prescribed technique for hand rubbing, aimed at physically removing contamination from all parts of the hands
  • Rinsing of hands
  • Hygienic drying

6.2.2 Taps should not be a source of contamination and therefore hands should not come into contact with taps after they have been washed. For example, taps should be turned off using a paper towel. (This should be a fresh towel and not the same one as used to dry hands.)

6.2.3 Where the piped supply is taken directly from an urn, safety must be considered. One option would be to put hot water and cold water in the bowl (plugged), with cold water tap still running. Hands can then be put into the water and rubbed together using the running cold water to rinse. The plug could then be removed.

6.2.4 Hand washing requirements apply to every person working in a food handling area whether or not they handle food.

6.3 Clothing

6.3.1 Clean clothing must be worn by each food handler at all times.

6.3.2 Where open, high risk food is handled, clean protective clothing must be worn by each food handler at all times.

6.3.3 The protective clothing must include a clean tunic, coat or uniform and suitable head covering. It must be kept in good condition and changed when dirty, particularly when moving from a ‘dirty’ operation such as cleaning raw vegetables to a ‘clean’ operation such as making sandwiches.

6.3.4 Where only packaged food or raw fruit and vegetables are handled, suitable, clean clothing is sufficient.

6.4 Reporting Illness

6.4.1 The food business operator must take appropriate action as soon as he/she suspects or becomes aware that a member of staff is suffering from any of the symptoms or conditions listed below. This may involve temporary exclusion from work or exclusion from specific duties.

Conditions/Symptoms:

  • Diarrhoea
  • Vomiting
  • Discharge from gums/mouth, ears or eyes
  • Sore throat with fever
  • Recurring bowel disorder
  • Recurring skin ailment
  • Any other ailment that may present a risk to food safety

6.4.2 Alternative duties must not involve any likelihood of directly or indirectly contaminating food, e.g. direct contact with open food, surfaces and equipment in areas where open food is stored or processed, or high risk food handlers.

6.4.3 Excluded staff may only return to work when they can show that the illness no longer presents a risk.

6.4.4 Any person working in a food handling area must report certain illnesses or conditions to the food business operator where there is any likelihood of them directly or indirectly contaminating food. They must immediately report if they:

  • Know or suspect that they are a carrier of a disease likely to be transmitted through food; or
  • Are afflicted with an infected wound, skin infection, sores, diarrhoea or any analogous medical condition such as stomach upset or vomiting.

7.0 PROTECTING FOOD FROM CONTAMINATION

Legal References:

EC Regulation 852/2004, Article 4(2) and Annex II, Chapter III, (1)

EC Regulation 852/2004, Article 4(2) and Annex II, Chapter III, (2)(f)&(h)

EC Regulation 852/2004, Article 4(2) and Annex II, Chapter V, (1)(b)&(c)

EC Regulation 852/2004, Article 4(2) and Annex II, Chapter IX

EC Regulation 852/2004, Article 4(2) and Annex II, Chapter X

7.1 Layout/Structure

7.1.1 The unit must be large enough for the type of operation carried out. In particular, there must be sufficient space to prevent contamination of foods to facilitate adequate cross contamination prevention procedures.

7.2 Food Protection

7.2.1 Layout, facilities and equipment must be capable of protecting food from any contamination likely to render the food unfit for human consumption, injurious to health or contaminated in such a way that it would be unreasonable to expect it to be consumed in that state.

7.2.2 Food being transported to mobile food units must be wrapped, covered and/or placed in suitable containers to prevent contamination. Where appropriate, the containers must be capable of maintaining an appropriate temperature.

7.2.3 All wrappings, containers etc. in contact with food must be made of food grade material. Food grade, washable material, such as containers and crates should be used to transport higher risk (perishable) food ( e.g. cooked meats, sandwiches, cheese etc.) and bakery goods.

7.2.4 Containers must be kept clean and in good repair.

7.2.5 Food must be kept separate from non-food items or materials which may cause contamination, e.g. fuel.

7.2.6 If both raw and cooked foods are to be transported at the same time, the items must be wrapped or kept in separate containers and placed so that no cross contamination can occur.

7.2.7 Likely sources of contamination and examples of protection include:

Public

High risk food on display must be protected from the public touching, coughing or sneezing over it. This could involve wrapping, screening or covering the food or keeping it out of reach.

Animals must not be permitted in units.

Food must not be placed on the ground or floor.

Natural Elements ( i.e. weather)

The unit must be protected from the elements where open food is sold.

Cross Contamination

Raw and cooked foods must be stored and displayed separately unless they are wrapped so as to prevent cross contamination. (See Section 5.4 – Prevention of Cross Contamination)

7.2.8 Food must not be placed in contact with toxic, flaking or splintering surfaces.

7.2.9 Food must be placed so as to avoid risk of contamination by waste, unfit food, raw food, or any drips or leaks from these.

8.0 PEST CONTROL

Legal References:

EC Regulation 852/2004, Article 4(2) and Annex II, Chapter III, (1)

EC Regulation 852/2004, Article 4(2) and Annex II, Chapter III, (2)(h)

EC Regulation 852/2004, Article 4(2) and Annex II, Chapter IX, (4)

8.1 Exclusion of Pests

8.1.1 Mobile food units must be designed to prevent the access of pests, such as rats, mice, birds and flying insects.

8.1.2 Doors in mobile food vans should be kept closed where at all possible. If the door is to be left open to further increase ventilation then a washable insect proof screen should be installed at the entrance.

8.2 Measures to protect against contamination of food by Pests

8.2.1 Food must be placed where it cannot be contaminated by animals or pests. This may be by placing food at a suitable height, behind barriers or screens, under covers or in suitable containers, wrappers, storage or display equipment.

8.2.2 Bins must be lidded.

8.2.3 Regular cleaning must be carried out to reduce pest problems.

9.0 WASTE

Legal References:

EC Regulation 852/2004, Article 4(2) and Annex II, Chapter III, (1)

EC Regulation 852/2004, Article 4(2) and Annex II, Chapter III, (2)(f)

EC Regulation 852/2004, Article 4(2) and Annex II, Chapter VI (1-4)

9.1 Waste - General

9.1.1 A suitable receptacle, with a close fitting lid, must be provided for the storage of waste materials on the unit.

This must be cleaned and disinfected if necessary on a regular basis. The use of pedal bins and bin liners will reduce the risk of cross contamination.

9.1.2 Refuse and waste must not be allowed to accumulate on the floor. Any waste awaiting disposal later, must be kept in suitable containers that are large enough, emptied regularly and not allowed to overflow. If disposal facilities are not available on site then the bin must be large enough to hold waste produced during the trading period.

9.1.3 Refuse/waste must not be stored in any way that it will be an attraction to pests.

9.1.4 Traders must make their own adequate arrangements for waste storage and its legal removal from site after trading.

9.2 Waste – Receptacles and Containers

9.2.1 The internal and external surfaces of non-disposable waste containers must be washable and in good repair.

9.2.2 For businesses where the only solid waste produced is dry waste, such as packaging, a closable container may not be necessary.

9.2.3 Strong plastic refuse sacks may be used to store waste, provided that they are used in a manner that avoids the contamination of hands or food and the attraction of pests ( e.g. regular removal, adequate strength and appropriate location).

9.3 Liquid Waste/Drainage

9.3.1 Where liquid waste cannot be linked directly to the mains drainage system, holding containers may be used. These containers must be readily identifiable so that their intended use is understood and that they are visibly different from potable water containers.

9.3.2 Waste water must be collected in a readily identifiable sealed container. It must not be discharged directly onto the unit’s stance or surrounding area. It must be disposed of to a suitable drainage system at the end of each trading day. This excludes the disposal down surface water drains.

9.3.3 External surfaces of the container must be cleaned and disinfected at a suitable frequency. The procedure must include any hoses/pipes which connect the container to the unit.


10.0 TEMPERATURE CONTROL

Legal References:

EC Regulation 852/2004, Article 4(2) and Annex II, Chapter III, (2)(g)

EC Regulation 852/2004, Article 4(2) and Annex II, Chapter IX, (5)

EC Regulation 852/2004, Article 4(2) and Annex II, Chapter IX, (6)

EC Regulation 852/2004, Article 4(2) and Annex II, Chapter IX, (7)

10.1 Temperature Control – Facilities and Equipment

10.1.1 Mobile food units must be provided with suitable and adequate temperature controlled storage facilities for perishable and frozen foodstuffs.

Adequate temperature controlled storage facilities must be provided for the storage of perishable foods outwith trading times.

10.1.2 Where temperature controlled storage facilities are used, suitable means of monitoring temperatures must be provided.

In this respect a suitable probe thermometer must be provided. The use of disposable probe wipes is also recommended for the hygienic cleaning of your probe thermometer.

10.2 Temperature Control – Specific Requirements

Detailed below are the key areas in relation to Temperature Control, some or all of which will apply to your business, depending on the extent of your food activities.

10.2.1 Refrigeration

A food temperature of 8 oC or below is effective in controlling the multiplication of most bacteria in perishable food. It is recommended practice to operate refrigerators and chills at 5 oC or below.

10.2.2 Frozen Storage

Holding food at temperatures of -18 oC or below will prevent bacteria multiplying.

10.2.3 Cooking

Temperatures of 75 oC or above are effective in destroying almost all types of bacteria. However, cooking temperatures below this level are also effective provided that the food is held at these temperatures for a suitable time period.

10.2.4 Hot Holding

Food which is kept hot must be held at above 63 oC.

10.2.5 Cooling

Food should be cooled as quickly as possible and then refrigerated.

10.2.6 Reheating

All food which has previously been heated or cooked in your business and is then to be re-heated, must be raised to a temperature of 82 oC or above.

10.2.7 Ice Cream

If soft serve ice cream is sold, the temperature of the pasteurised liquid mix (or sterilised mix once open) must never exceed 7.0ºC. If pasteurised mix goes above this temperature it should be discarded. The hopper of the soft serve ice cream should be capable of maintaining the ice cream mix temperature below 7.0ºC.

11.0 TRAINING

Legal References:

EC Regulation 852/2004, Article 4(2) and Annex II, Chapter XII

11.1 General

11.1.1 All food handlers must be able to demonstrate that they have received an appropriate level of food hygiene training or supervision for the tasks they are required to undertake.

11.1.2 All food handlers must receive instruction to ensure they work hygienically. In particular they must receive written or verbal induction instruction before commencing any food handling activities. Induction instructions must include:

  • the standards of personal hygiene expected
  • the need to inform management of any illness or circumstances that could pose a risk to the hygienic operation of the business (See Section 6.0 – Personal Hygiene)

11.2 Low Risk Food Handlers

11.2.1Food handlers who only handle low risk open foods or pre-wrapped, canned or bottled goods should be supervised and instructed in key hygiene matters, i.e.

  • Stock rotation and date labelling procedures
  • Responsibilities and procedures for cleaning and/or disinfection
  • Requirements for hygienic and efficient use of refrigerated/display units
  • Procedures for dealing with unfit and out of date foods
  • Responsibilities and procedures for reporting defects regarding the structure of the unit or equipment or signs of pest infestation
  • Any supervisory responsibilities
  • Awareness of any other hazards and control measures as identified within the food safety management system

[Source – Industry Guide – Markets and Fairs]

11.3 Open High Risk Food Handlers

11.3.1 Food handlers who handle open high risk foods should undergo structured training to Elementary or Basic Level. This training should cover the following as a minimum:

  • Key hygiene matters as listed at 11.2.1 above, plus
  • Causes of food poisoning, its symptoms and prevention
  • Sources of food contamination and its prevention
  • Personal hygiene
  • Elementary design and construction of food premises
  • Cleaning and disinfection
  • Pest identification and control
  • Food storage and temperature control
  • Food processing and temperature control

12.0 VENTILATION

Legal References: None

Note – No specific provision for the provision or adequacy of ventilation exists in relation to mobile vehicles from a food safety perspective.

12.1 Every mobile food unit must be provided with sufficient ventilation, not including the open service hatch of the unit.

12.2 Ventilation openings and mechanisms must be kept clean and be designed to prevent the entry of dust and all pests.

13.0 LIGHTING

Legal References: None

13.1 Vehicles must be provided with sufficient natural lighting and suitably protected artificial lighting.

14.0 FOOD SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

Legal References:

EC Regulation 852/2004, Article 5

14.1 All food business operators must implement permanent procedures based upon the HACCP principles.

14.2 The HACCP principles consist of the following:

a) identifying any hazards that must be prevented, eliminated or reduced to acceptable levels;

b) identifying the critical control points at the step or steps at which control is essential to prevent or eliminate a hazard or to reduce it to acceptable levels;

c) establishing critical limits at critical control points which separate acceptability from unacceptability for the prevention, elimination or reduction of identified hazards;

d) establishing and implementing effective monitoring procedures at critical control points;

e) establishing corrective actions when monitoring indicates that a critical control point is not under control;

f) establishing procedures, which shall be carried out regularly, to verify that the measures outlined in subparagraphs a) to e) are working effectively; and

g) establishing documents and records commensurate with the nature and size of the food business to demonstrate the effective application of the measures outlined in subparagraphs a) to f).

When any modification is made to the products handled, the process or any step, the food business operator must review the procedure and make the necessary changes to it.

The food business operator must ensure that the said procedures are up to date and be able to present the aforementioned permanent procedures to any Local Authority officer conducting a food hygiene inspection within the mobile food unit. Records associated with the said procedures must be retained for an appropriate period.

14.3 Satisfactory completion of any of the following may, where appropriate, be deemed to meet the requirements of 14.1 and 14.2:

  • CookSafe
  • RetailSafe
  • Safer Food Better Business

15.0 ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO THE SALE OF ICE CREAM

15.1 The following standards apply to mobile food units selling ice cream in addition to the general standards applying to all mobile food units.

15.1.1 Scoops, servers and other utensils must be maintained in good condition and replaced if their surfaces become cracked or broken. They must be cleaned and disinfected each day before use and at frequent intervals during trading. The disinfectant used should be non-tainting. Disinfectants specially formulated for this purpose may be obtained from your ice cream supplier.

15.1.2 Between uses, scoops and servers should be rinsed in clean water and then stored in a solution of disinfectant. Before the scoop server is next used, the disinfectant residues should be rinsed off in a separate bowl of clean water (the “three bowl method”). The contents of the bowls should be changed frequently during the day (at least every hour or more frequently if they become heavily soiled). Proprietary three-compartment scoop holders are available for this purpose. A supply of disinfectant solution and enough clean water for the day’s trading should be carried on the vehicle.

15.1.3 Suitable freezers/conservators must be provided to ensure that the temperature of the ice cream is satisfactory. Bulk freezers should maintain ice cream at -18 oC (or colder). Display freezers (conservators) should maintain ice cream at -10 oC (or colder). If ice cream melts it should be discarded or returned to the manufacturer. Conservators/freezers must be well maintained and thoroughly cleaned. They must be defrosted regularly and should be used only for the storage of ice cream, liquid ice cream mixes and ice lollies. Returnable/refillable containers should be rinsed out and returned to the manufacturer for proper cleaning and disinfection.

15.1.4 If soft serve ice cream is sold, the temperature of the pasteurised liquid mix (or sterilised mix once open) must never exceed 7.0 oC. If pasteurised mix goes above this temperature, it should be discarded. The hopper of the soft serve ice cream should be capable of maintaining the ice cream mix temperature below 7.0 oC. The cleaning of soft serve equipment is complex and should be conducted according to the manufacturer’s instructions. The correct cleaning materials must be used.

15.1.5 A suitable thermometer must be provided and used to check that the above temperatures are maintained.

15.1.6 Wafers, cones and other confectionery items used in conjunction with the serving of ice cream may be used directly from their packages provided these are raised off the floor and not exposed to the risk of contamination by customers and insects, etc. Toppings, fruit sauces and syrups, if not packaged in ready-to-use containers, should be decanted into suitable lidded, impervious containers before use. This is particularly important once canned fruits have been opened.

15.1.7 Suitable facilities must be available for cleaning ice cream vehicles and equipment. At the end of every working day, or more frequently if required, all ice cream equipment should be thoroughly cleaned and disinfected. Counters and other working surfaces should be cleaned with a warm solution of a disinfectant.

Annex 1 – Sample Certificate

Sample Certificate

Annex 2

Definition of Mobile Food Unit Categories

Category

Types of Operation

Period of Validity

Category 1

  • Tea, coffee only
  • Wrapped food only
  • Raw fruit and vegetables only
  • Wet fish only
  • Any combination of the above

3 Years from date of issue

Category 2

  • Ice cream (soft-serve)
  • Any unwrapped, open food other than wet fish, raw fruit and vegetables
  • Hot dogs (cart)
  • Crepes
  • Doughnuts
  • Butcher (Unwrapped raw meat only or also selling wrapped ready-to-eat foods)
  • Wet fish and unwrapped ready-to-eat food
  • Hot food (burgers, kebabs, chips, pizza, baked potatoes, noodles etc) where there is no food preparation ( i.e. chopping of raw vegetables, washing of salad vegetables etc)
  • Unwrapped sandwiches, wraps, baguettes etc where hot and cold fillings are sold and cold fillings are prepared elsewhere ( i.e. not in the unit)
  • Any hot food where there is preparation of foods but where all such food is subsequently cooked ( e.g. onions for filled rolls and hot dogs)

1 Year from date of issue

Category 3

  • Scoop ice cream vendors

1 Year from date of issue

Category 4

  • Any hot food where there is food preparation involved and where any of the food prepared is not subsequently cooked ( e.g.salad vegetables)
  • Unwrapped sandwiches, wraps, baguettes etc. where hot and cold fillings are sold and cold fillings are prepared within the unit
  • Butcher selling unwrapped raw meat and unwrapped ready-to-eat foods

1 Year from date of issue


Contact

Email: Wendy McCutcheon, wendy.mccutcheon@gov.scot