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Publication - Publication

Fair Start Scotland: Children's Rights Welfare Impact Assessment (screening)

Published: 11 May 2018
Part of:
Economy, Equality and rights, Work and skills
ISBN:
9781788518819

Screening for the assessment of the impact on children and young people’s rights and wellbeing of the Fair Start Scotland employment support service.

5 page PDF

173.2kB

5 page PDF

173.2kB

Contents
Fair Start Scotland: Children's Rights Welfare Impact Assessment (screening)
Page 1

5 page PDF

173.2kB

Children’s Rights and Welfare Impact Assessment: Screening - Key Questions

CRWIA Stage 1

Screening - key questions

1. What aspects of the policy/measure will affect children and young people up to the age of 18?

Fair Start Scotland may impact positively on Children’s Rights and wellbeing. The service aims to reach out to those furthest from the labour market, including those with protected characteristics, e.g. those living within lowest 15% Scotland Index of Multiple Deprivation ( SIMD), disabled people, lone parents, Minority Ethnic and other groups. By supporting those groups into sustained employment, Fair Start Scotland will have a positive effect by increasing families income and will improve the life chances of children and young people including impacting on child poverty within Scotland.

Successful delivery of Fair Start Scotland will help to support adults who are currently further from the labour market into sustainable employment and will be important for lifting families out of poverty. This will contribute to the Scottish Government’s aim of treating people with dignity, fairness and respect.

Understanding those drivers of inequality and taking action to address them is key to the success of the service. In doing so Fair Start Scotland will contribute positively to the life chances and experiences of children and young people.

2. What likely impact - direct or indirect - will the policy/measure have on children and young people?

The service aims to reach out to those furthest from the labour market. Addressing discrimination in the employment sector for groups such as disabled and minority ethnic groups is a performance indicator within the service. Several indicators of children’s wellbeing will likely be positively affected by Fair Start Scotland, for example, successful outcomes in these areas may positively impact on articles 2 and 3, non-discrimination and best interests of the child,

Article 2 – Non-discrimination: Children should not be discriminated against in the enjoyment of their rights. No child should be discriminated against because of the situation or status of their parent/carer(s).

Article 3 – Best interests of the child: Every decision and action taken relating to a child must be in their best interests. Governments must take all appropriate legislative and administrative measures to ensure that children have the protection necessary for their wellbeing.

The impact of moving those groups into employment is likely to improve the life chances of children and young people within those families

The service will also affect some young people directly; 16 & 17 year olds who are either disabled or in receipt of Employment Support Allowance can access immediate entry to Fair Start Scotland. The support provided for this group will have a direct impact on children’s rights for this relatively small cohort of young people.

3. Are there particular groups of children and young people who are more likely to be affected than others?

The service allows early entry to several groups such as disabled, lone parents and minority ethnic groups who statistically suffer higher poverty rates. Additionally, as detailed in section 2 above - 16 & 17 year olds who are either disabled or in receipt of Employment Support Allowance are a group who can access immediate entry to Fair Start Scotland. As this is direct support for this group of young people, it is more likely the impact of the service will be greater for this relatively small cohort within Fair Start Scotland.

4. Who else have you involved in your deliberations?

From July to October 2015, the Scottish Government undertook an extensive consultation on the devolution of employment support. In line with the Scottish Government’s wider commitment to hear directly from those who are impacted on policy decisions user and stakeholder engagement, more than 70 events were organised by groups throughout Scotland. The consultation was closed to respondents on 9th October 2015.

Equality groups and a range of other interested parties were encouraged to participate in the consultative approach and contribute to the events held throughout Scotland. Poverty Action Scotland, Close the Gap Scotland, Scottish Refugee Council, Capability Scotland, RNIB and One Parent Families Scotland were represented at the events.

Existing and prospective training providers and employers were also included and attended as part of the consultation process , along with representation from other third sector areas such Scottish Council for Voluntary Organisations, Scottish Union for Supported Employment, CEMVO (Council of Ethnic Minority Voluntary Organisation) and Health Scotland.

5. Will this require a CRWIA?

Fair Start Scotland employment support service will impact directly and indirectly on children and young people’s rights and wellbeing, I am satisfied that a CRWIA is required.

CRWIA Declaration

Tick relevant section, and complete the form.

CRWIA required

CRWIA not required

 

Authorisation

Policy lead

Mr Greig Chisholm
Policy Manager
Employability Division, Fair Work, Employability & Skills Directorate, Scottish Government.

Date

April 2018

Deputy Director or equivalent

Mr Gavin Gray
Deputy Director
Employability Division, Fair Work, Employability & Skills Directorate, Scottish Government.

Date

April 2018


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