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Publication - Publication

Scotland Performs Update

Published: 15 Dec 2016
Part of:
Economy
ISBN:
9781786526373

Scottish Government performance scorecards and narratives as at 15 December 2016.

112 page PDF

5.9MB

112 page PDF

5.9MB

Contents
Scotland Performs Update
National Outcomes - Narratives

112 page PDF

5.9MB

National Outcomes - Narratives

We live in a Scotland that is the most attractive place for doing business in Europe

Example contribution by Highlands and Islands Enterprise ( HIE)

MeyGen free stream tidal energy project

  • MeyGen is the world's largest planned free stream tidal energy project, situated in the Pentland Firth, between Caithness and Orkney.
  • The project is owned by Atlantis Resources Ltd, a global leader in tidal power.
  • The first phase, comprising four 1.5 MW turbines, began generating electricity in November 2016. Eventually, 269 turbines are planned to be installed on the seabed, generating enough electricity to power 175,000 homes.

Budget

£51m including £3.34m grant funding from HIE, the region's development agency. Other funders include the Scottish and UK Governments, the Crown Estate and Atlantis Resources Limited.

Achievements

  • The project will eventually feature 269 turbines, generating 398MW of clean electricity - enough to power 175,000 homes.
  • Along with the European Marine Energy Centre and Wave Energy Scotland, MeyGen is helping Scotland maintain its status as the best place in the world for marine energy research, development and deployment.

Key partners

  • Atlantis Resources Ltd
  • The Crown Estate
  • Scottish Government (via the Renewable Energy Investment Fund)
  • UK Government
  • Delivery has been achieved through a highly effective public-private sector partnership.
  • The £51m investment package was achieved as a result of collaboration between government, enterprise agencies, the Crown Estate and Atlantis Resources Ltd.

Contribution to National Outcomes

  • MeyGen is one of a series of innovative projects, supported by the Scottish Government and its enterprise agencies, that have helped make Scotland the global leader in marine energy.
  • Capitalising on the huge energy resources of the Highlands and Islands, the European Marine Energy Centre ( EMEC) in Orkney was established in 2003 as the world's first grid-connected test centre for both wave and tidal energy devices.
  • Atlantis Resources Limited was attracted to Scotland in 2012 by the excellent tidal resource around the coastline of the Highlands and Islands, access to Crown Estate commercial leasing rounds for both wave and tidal projects in the Pentland Firth and Orkney Waters. It now owns 100% of the MeyGen project and has been successful in obtaining funding from The Crown Estate, Department of Energy and Climate Change, Renewable Energy Investment Fund and HIE for their £51m MeyGen project.
  • To build upon Scotland's frontier position Wave Energy Scotland, administered by HIE, was established in 2014 as a new model to invest in pioneering research and development that will underpin the next generation of wave energy technology.
  • Scotland has some of the world's finest wave and tidal resources as well as the facilities and mechanisms in place to make Scotland an attractive proposition. That is why leading edge companies such as Atlantis Resources Ltd choose to do business in Scotland.

We realise our full economic potential with more and better employment opportunities for our people

Example contribution by Skills Development Scotland ( SDS)

Modern Apprenticeships ( MAs)

  • SDS delivers MAs, which provide individuals with the opportunity to secure industry-recognised qualifications while they are in employment and earning a wage.
  • MAs help employers to develop their workforce by training new staff, and upskilling existing employees.
  • 26,000 MA opportunities are being funded in 2016/17. This is in line with the Scottish Government's Youth Employment Strategy ambition to reach 30,000 apprenticeship starts annually by 2020.

Budget

£76.3m spend 2015/16.

Achievements

  • Target of 26,000 MA starts in 2016/17 (There were 25,818 starts in 2015/16).
  • Q4 2015-16 - 56% of MAs in training were in STEM (science, technology, engineering and maths) frameworks. The majority of those in STEM frameworks were aged 16- 24 (89%) and most were at level 3 or above (92%).
  • Net additional return on £1 of public investment in apprenticeships is £7.14 (at Level 3) - Cambridge Policy Consultants - Review of the Allocation of Employability Resources in Scotland (2014).

Key partners

  • Local authorities
  • Training providers
  • Employers
  • Scottish Government
  • Sector Skills Councils
  • Scottish Apprenticeship Advisory Board
  • MAs provide work-based training towards an industry approved qualification.
  • MAs are delivered in partnership with learning providers and employers. SDS contributes towards the cost of the training, and pays the training provider directly.
  • There are over 80 Modern Apprenticeship frameworks. These have been developed by sector skills councils, in consultation with their industry.

Contribution to National Outcomes

  • Provide more and better employment opportunities - 96% of employers say trainees are better able to do their job as result of their MA. 42% said that offering MAs had helped them to win business (2015 MA Employers Survey).
  • A greater chance of sustaining employment post completion - 91% of MAs sustain employment for 6 months post completion and, of those, 67% remained with the same employer. (2016 MA Outcomes Survey).
  • Enhanced corporate image - 69% of employers said that offering MAs had helped improve their image in the sector (2015 MA Employers Survey).
  • Increased staff morale and lower staff turnover - 67% said that offering MAs had improved their staff retention (2015 MA Employers Survey).
  • Improvements in the core skills of participants - for example 90% of employers reported an improvement in problem solving skills due to completing the MA (2015 MA Employers Survey).
  • Increased opportunities for career progression - 88% of employers said MAs were important to their business and workforce development (2015 MA Employers Survey).
  • 75% of employers saw improved productivity as a result of having an MA (2015 MA Employers Survey).

We are better educated, more skilled and more successful, renowned for our research and innovation

Example contribution by the Scottish Funding Council ( SFC)

Innovation Centres ( ICs)

  • The IC programme is fundamentally about bringing people together, physically into the same space, and conceptually, so that ideas are sparked, shared and co-developed. ICs are internationally ambitious communities of universities, businesses and others to deliver economic growth and wider benefits for Scotland.
  • The ICs are demand-led and businesses are, therefore, central to their activity. Industry is involved in the design, implementation, day to day management and the governance of the ICs.
  • There are currently eight ICs including Stratified Medicine Scotland, Sensor and Imaging Systems ( CENSIS), Digital Health & Care Institute, Industrial Biotechnology, Aquaculture, Oil and Gas, Construction Scotland and The Data Lab.

Budget

  • Through the Scottish Funding Council, the Scottish Government has committed funding of up to £120m to the programme over six years (2013 to 2019) and included up to £14m for capital equipment in 2014.
  • Additional funding to the IC programme includes: up to £2m per annum to support taught postgraduate places through the ICs and up to £1m for a Scottish Government Innovation Centre Challenge Fund.
  • The enterprise agencies have contributed funding to a number of specific business focused projects such as MIRAGE, SMS Technology Showcase, SAIC Business Advisor support, Aquaculture Hatchery and the Advanced Construction Centre fit out.
  • In terms of other funding, EKOS undertook a Business Engagement and Economic Impact Evaluation of the programme in support of the Independent Review of the Programme, chaired by Professor Reid. It indicates that, so far, there has been just over £7m of in-kind funding from a variety of sources (including university and business) as well as over £2m from industry (in cash), demonstrating a leveraging of additional funding.

Achievements

  • The ICs are engaging with business on projects with the greatest potential for Scotland's economy and wider society. To date the ICs have supported approximately 155 projects involving academia and business. Three examples are provided below, but there are many more:
  • The Scottish Aquaculture Innovation Centre 'sea lice' project - a grand challenge facing a sector in an open innovation type model, were the intended solution will benefit all involved. This project won the 2016 'Scottish Food & Drink Excellence Award for Innovation'.
  • The Data Lab in conjunction with CENSIS is launching a sector specific call for projects, targeting the Cyber security services community in Scotland. The call is seeking innovative and collaborative projects between an industry and/or public sector lead organisations, and one or more academic partners, which demonstrate a clear economic or social benefit for Scotland.
  • In October 2016 a new collaborative partnership between AstraZeneca and the Stratified Medicine Scotland Innovation Centre (represents NHS Scotland, Scottish Universities and industry partners), will offer unique opportunities in genomic medicine using patients' genetic information to develop innovative new treatments and target the right patients to the right medicines.

Key partners

  • The IC programme is being delivered in partnership with Scottish Enterprise and Highland and Islands Enterprise. It is now expanding and working with the NHS, Zero Waste Scotland, Interface and other relevant bodies in the research and innovation landscape.
  • The ICs exist to influence culture change, grow networks and promote innovation. Often the impact of this is hard to measure but feedback from industry (as seen via the evidence to the Reid Review and supporting documentation) demonstrates the ICs are already having a positive impact in this area.
  • The eight ICs are part of a community of ICs - sharing good practice, funding joint projects and other activities, and sharing resources.

Contribution to National Outcomes

  • The purpose of the ICs programme is to:
  • Deliver industry demand-led collaborative innovation.
  • Support and enable business to increase competitiveness.
  • Create economic impact through increased revenues and jobs.
  • Focus on transformational innovation opportunities.
  • Develop ICs as open organisations which seek new industry partners.
  • This is being achieved through business-university collaborations which address identified industry challenges and exploit the strength of Scotland's research base.
  • The Independent Review of the ICs Programme, chaired by Professor Graeme Reid, concluded that the programme was on the right track and set out a realistic framework for further enhancement.
  • The IC programme is in the early stages of development and delivery, yet the recent review found evidence of benefits and impacts for participating companies, and clear signs of the potential for future impacts.

Our young people are successful learners, confident individuals, effective contributors and responsible citizens

Example contribution by Bòrd na Gàidhlig

Functions linked to the promotion of Gaelic

  • This involves managing the mechanism of Gaelic plans and providing support for a range of small Gaelic bodies.
  • It also involves working in a number of sectors including education, arts, adult education, community development, media and publishing.
  • It has duties to prepare a National Plan for Gaelic, Guidance on Gaelic education and Guidance on Gaelic language planning.

Budget

£5.1m

Achievements

  • The wide ranging nature of Bòrd na Gàidhlig means that what was delivered is also wide ranging. It includes:
  • Annual Continuing Professional Development for Gaelic teachers and early years' workers
    - with an t-Alltan conference hosted annually, this year over 200 delegates for 2 days of CPD in September.
  • Support for teachers into Gaelic - GIfT and STREAP courses - give children better quality education.
  • Maintenance of Gaelic early years groups - 65 across Scotland, over 500 Gaelic bookbug sessions delivered last year.
  • Support for parents - including through funding Comunn nam Parant who support parents in relation to the Education (Scotland) Act 2016.
  • Resources for teachers and schools provided free of charge to Gaelic schools (via Stòrlann). Most recently, the launch of Fileanta and Lasadh websites aimed at primary and secondary Gaelic education and GoGaelic school resources - a framework produced to coincide with 1+2 approach to language learning which contains a variety of resources and 18 days of teacher training. E-sgoilproject enabling increased access to Gaelic medium education at secondary level.
  • Additionally - a plethora of extracurricular initiatives for young people have been delivered throughout the country by Feisean nan Gàidheal, Comunn na Gàidhlig and An Comunn Gàidhealach.

Key partners

  • Local authorities
  • MG ALBA
  • Education Scotland
  • Scottish Qualifications Authority
  • Scottish Funding Council
  • Highlands and Islands Enterprise
  • Creative Scotland
  • Scottish Natural Heritage
  • Storlann
  • Comunn na Gàidhlig
  • Feisean nan Gaidheal
  • Comhairle nan Leabhraichean
  • An Comunn Gàidhealach
  • The outputs that Bòrd na Gàidhlig has delivered have been principally through three routes:
  • By its own activity.
  • By means of grants and contracts with smaller Gaelic community bodies and groups.
  • By means of collaboration with other bodies/authorities in Scottish public life.

Contribution to National Outcomes

  • Bòrd na Gàidhlig has a wide ranging remit, including education. It funds and supports the following:
  • Stòrlann - the Gaelic resource agency, responsible for producing Gaelic medium teaching materials and for providing support for Gaelic teachers.
  • An Seotal Database - responsible for standardising Gaelic terminology for schools education.
  • Gaelic4Parents - support for parents with children in Gaelic education with no Gaelic background.
  • Gaelic early years groups - funding for Gaelic play leaders and materials.
  • Early years workers - deliver Gaelic bookbug reading sessions and support early years groups and nurseries.
  • Fèisean nan Gàidheal -who reach around 30,000 people offering opportunities for young people to learn and perform traditional music, Gaelic song, Gaelic drama and traditional dance.
  • Comunn na Gàidhlig - who provide Gaelic extracurricular and initiatives for young people.
  • Comhairle nan Leabhraichean - who produce Gaelic literature for all ages.
  • Continuing Professional Development - support for Gaelic teachers by means of Gaelic Immersion for Teachers course and STREAP teacher transfer course.
  • Additionally, Bòrd na Gàidhlig advises the Scotish Government and others on education and early years policy relating to Gaelic medium education and immersion principles. Bòrd na Gàidhlig is currently producing Statutory Guidance for Gaelic Education under the Education (Scotland) Act 2016.

Our children have the best start in life and are ready to succeed

Example contribution by the Scottish Social Services Council ( SSSC)

Regulation of workers in daycare services for children

  • The SSSC is responsible for regulating the social services workforce. This includes everyone working in daycare for children's services; early years provision and out of school care.
  • An important aspect of regulation is ensuring that all registered workers have the qualifications required for their role. In daycare of children, that means all managers must have or gain within a specified timeframe, a degree level qualification, generally the BA in Childhood Practice.

Budget

Circa £1.3m.

Achievements

  • As at 22 November 2016, SSSC has delivered a position where 32,922 people are registered to work in day care of children. 3,008 are new to the Register so far this year and 1,328 are renewals, which means they have been working in the sector for more than 5 years.
  • 99.8% of new registrants used the online portal, My SSSC, and 88.98% of employers are using it. This is a significant channel shift to use of new technology for this key function in the last 4 years.
  • There are a range of online communications with registrants and other stakeholders. SSSC News is issued to all registrants and wider contacts. Tailored e-bulletins are sent to different groups of workers to make sure they get news of relevance to them - there is a bespoke e-bulletin for people working in early years.
  • Events are run and learning resources provided. For example, there is an Early Years Reference Group which meets twice yearly to ensure the Childhood Practice Standard continues to be relevant. The group was active in a recent comprehensive review of the standard. There is also a Childhood Practice Providers Group made up of representatives from learning providers. They share practice and consider theoretical perspectives/policies which may need to be included in delivery of the Childhood Practice award. There are also examples from early years settings on the SSSC Step Into Leadership website.
  • In line with responsibilities to protect and enhance the safety and welfare of people who use services, the SSSC has powers to investigate concerns about workers and take action where these are deemed necessary. In this group of workers 22 new applicants are being investigated before they can register, and 293 existing registrants are currently being investigated. This represents 1% compared to an average of 1.8% across the whole sector for registrants and 1% compared to 4% across the whole sector for applicants.

Key partners

  • Frontline workers and managers in early years services
  • Daycare for children employers
  • Umbrella bodies such as the Coalition of Care Providers Scotland and Early Years Scotland
  • Learning providers - universities, colleges, independent training providers National bodies
  • Scottish Qualifications Agency
  • Scottish College for Educational Leadership, Education Scotland
  • Care Inspectorate
  • General Teaching Council for Scotland
  • Scottish Government
  • Changes to SSSC processes such as the online shift were delivered through close consultation with user groups of workers and employers to make sure the system delivers for them.
  • The learning and development resources were all produced collaboratively with workers, employers, learning providers and people who use services. SSSC worked in partnership with Scottish College for Educational Leadership in the leadership work for this sector, and with the Scottish Qualifications Authority on developing, quality assuring and accrediting qualifications and education.
  • SSSC held a range of engagement events on its fitness to practice approach to regulation, including a range of workers and employers in daycare for children. They were also key partners in our review of the Codes of Practice.

Contribution to National Outcomes

  • Access to good quality childcare is fundamental to ensuring our children have the best start in life and are ready to succeed. SSSC is supporting this by up-skilling the social service workforce, improving service quality and strengthening public protection, specifically around the regulation of workers in daycare services for children.
  • Evidence shows that the qualification level of workers, particularly managers, has a significant impact on the outcomes and experiences of children.
  • It is essential that the people delivering those services are skilled, trusted and confident - regulation makes a significant contribution to that:
  • All workers have to abide by the Codes of Practice for Social Service Workers and their employers the Codes of Practice for Social Service Employers. The Codes were refreshed in 2016 and set out the standards that must be met. They are focused on the rights and experiences of service users, in this case children and their families and carers.
  • All workers have to achieve practice qualifications and managers must also have a management qualification. If they do not meet the standards the SSSC will take action.

We live longer, healthier lives

Example contribution by NHS Health Scotland

Child Poverty, Health and Wellbeing e-learning programme

  • The programme aims to raise awareness of child poverty in Scotland and how poverty can impact on children and young people's health and wellbeing. It covers causes of child poverty, how it is measured and invites participants to consider their role in tackling child poverty.
  • It provides learning support on child poverty for health visitors and midwives - through both undergraduate programmes in higher education institutions and continuing professional development in Scotland. It supports them to consider their role in helping to assist children and their families who are living in poverty and affected by austerity.
  • The resource will be particularly relevant to individuals working across health, social care, education, the public sector and people who are in contact with children at work. It can be accessed at elearning.healthscotland.com.

Budget

Circa £3,000 development cost plus staff and partner time contributed.

Achievements

  • An e-learning resource with the following learning outcomes:
  • Describe what child poverty is and what causes it.
  • Outline how child poverty is defined and measured in Scotland.
  • Explain how poverty impacts children and young people's health and wellbeing.
  • Reflect on your role in reducing the impact of child poverty.
  • It secured 270 registered participants in its first few weeks, outperforming other e-learning resources and emphasising its cross-sector significance.

Key partners

  • Child Poverty Action Group ( CPAG)
  • Poverty Alliance
  • Universities
  • Edinburgh City Council
  • NHS Education for Scotland
  • The end product has been delivered as an e-learning resource having been inspired by earlier successful work, for example Healthier Wealthier Children (Glasgow) and that of the Early Years Collaborative.
  • It required significant partner involvement and is an excellent example of cross agency working between the NHS, Local Government and the Third Sector. It benefited from mutual concern to improve Scotland's National Outcomes.

Contribution to National Outcome

  • Health inequalities are the unfair and avoidable differences in people's health across social groups and between different population groups. Inequalities in health mean that some people live longer lives and live more years in good health than others.
  • To ensure that more people live longer and have more years in good health there is a need to act across a range of public policy areas, with policies to tackle economic and social inequalities alongside actions with a specific focus on disadvantaged groups and deprived areas. There is a need to shift the focus from meeting the cost of dealing with health or social problems after they have developed to prevention and early intervention.
  • There is a link between socio-economic disadvantage during the early years and health inequalities. One of the fundamental causes of health inequalities is income / money received by individuals or groups over a specific time period which can lead to poverty and marginalisation.
  • Income can therefore impact a child's readiness to learn and succeed, its life chances and eventually that child's ability to live a longer, healthy life.

We have tackled the significant inequalities in Scottish society

Example contribution by Transport Scotland

Accessible Travel Framework, "Going Further"

  • The vision of the Scotland's Accessible Travel Framework is to improve the travel experience for disabled people, who should enjoy the same rights, choices and opportunities to use transport services and infrastructure as everyone else.
  • It advocates a "Nothing About Us Without Us" disability rights approach to involving disabled people in improving transport accessibility. It includes what disabled people said was important to change in transport and their stories of how disabling barriers prevent them from making successful journeys or travelling at all.
  • The desired outcome of this new policy is to enable more disabled people to make safe and comfortable door-to-door journeys by working together. The document does not detail every travel accessibility issue or drill down into every different impairment, but gives a commitment to a continuing conversation with disabled people over the next ten years to raise issues and ensure positive change.

Budget

£50,000

Achievements

  • Transport Scotland is providing funding (around £50k) annually to a third sector organisation - the Scottish Disability Equality Forum ( SDEF) to design and host a website (accessibletravel.scot) containing information on accessible travel. This was launched along with the Framework.
  • As part of this funding, SDEF will also organise periodic engagement events and a longitudinal study with disabled people to find out if travel is getting more accessible over the ten year lifespan of the Framework.
  • These figures reflect initial expenditure on the process of Framework development, but the Framework acknowledges the money being spent by partners, as the good practice examples in the Framework show.

Key partners

  • Disabled People and their organisations
  • Transport service and infrastructure providers
  • Local government
  • Regional Transport Partnerships
  • Scottish Government
  • The Framework has been developed in close engagement with disabled people from across Scotland. One of its aims is to change the way things are done throughout transport, to include disabled people to make improvements in accessibility. The Framework details how that engagement will continue over the next ten years.
  • The Framework was developed on the basis of strong co-production. For example, the partners mentioned above worked together in a Steering Group, supported by Transport Scotland, to identify specific items for the high level action plan to tackle issues raised by disabled people.
    Example actions include:
  • Scope requirements for training with disabled people and transport providers/operators, including covering hidden disabilities and basic British Sign Language phrases.
  • Specify and agree common standards of service for disabled people if their public transport journeys are disrupted.
  • Explore ways of making disabled people more aware about how they can influence decision-making in transport.

Contribution to National Outcomes

  • Disabled people have the absolute right to live a life of equal opportunities like any other citizen.
  • Accessible travel can enable people to enjoy equal access to full citizenship, so this Framework is about identifying and removing disabling barriers which prevent people travelling or make their journeys an unpleasant experience.
  • The Framework contains a vision and four outcomes which were agreed by disabled people, their representatives and people who work in transport.
  • The Framework contains a high-level action plan for co-produced work to tackle the inequalities in access identified by disabled people.

We have improved the life chances for children, young people and families at risk

Example contribution by the Scottish Children's Reporter Administration ( SCRA)

Modern Apprentices

  • SCRA is the single integrated point of referral for the most vulnerable and at risk children and young people in Scotland. Referral to the Children's Reporter initiates the process of investigation to assess the most appropriate route through which children and young people ( C&YP) are protected from abuse, harm, neglect and exploitation by others as well as protection from risks associated with young people's offending behaviour in a system set up to meet their needs.
  • In 2015/16, SCRA:
  • Received 27,340 referrals for investigation and decision in 2015/16 for 15,329 C&YP (75% for care and protection).
  • Decided that 4,059 C&YP might need the protection of compulsory legal measures.
  • Arranged for 595 emergency child protection orders to be considered by Children's Hearings.
  • Arranged 34,896 children's hearings to make final decisions on necessary legal measures, 65% of these to review compulsory supervision orders ( CSO).
  • Conducted 10,648 proof callings in court to establish the legal basis of intervention with C&YP.
  • Led 777 appeals in court to uphold decisions of children's hearings.
  • 3,185 C&YP received the protection of compulsory measures of care with legal force through new CSOs at hearings in 2015/16, taking the total of children subject to a CSO to 10,379.
  • SCRA provide facilities to conduct hearings in every local authority area in Scotland.
  • SCRA is also involved in a wide programme of research to influence, shape and raise awareness of issues affecting children, young people and families at risk.
  • In addition to exercising its core functions in support of children, young people and families at risk, SCRA contributes to the National Outcome by employing young people with care experience as Modern Apprentices.

Budget

£21.3m revenue and £1.1m capital (total SCRA budget).

Achievements

  • Since 2010, SCRA has recruited and supported 12 Modern Apprentices with experience of care.
  • The contribution of the Modern Apprentices is integral to the work of SCRA; examples of their achievements include:
  • SCRA's Modern Apprentices have carried out inspections of Children's Hearings Centres, and this has been led and supported by SCRA's Research Team. The two inspection reports:
    'Fit For Us: making our system fit for us' (2011) and 'It's All About Change' (2013) have directly led to improvements across Scotland in Hearings Centres facilities.
  • One of SCRA's Modern Apprentices carried out a review 'Let's All Make a Change for Children & Young People. a young person's review of research on children's views of the Children's Hearings System' (2012) which highlighted that children and young people still did not feel listened to. This was widely well received and resulted in its author receiving the Modern Apprentice of the Year (Service Category).
  • 'How SCRA Communicates with Young People - young people's feedback' (2014) involved focus groups with young people across Scotland led by a Modern Apprentice. SCRA has responded to its findings by introducing new communication materials and tools for young people.
  • The idea for a "Pre-Hearing" pack, now issued to all those who will attend a Children's Hearing, originated with a Modern Apprentice.
  • The Modern Apprentices are involved in the creation of a Young People's Board for the Hearings System, and routinely contribute to the development of information flyers about the service, new communication tools, and the recruitment of staff.
  • Modern apprentices have made a key contribution to SCRA's corporate parenting plan.

Key partners

  • Children's Hearings, Scotland
  • Local Authorities
  • Police Scotland
  • University of Strathclyde
  • Children 1st
  • Barnardos Centre for Excellence for Looked after Children in Scotland
  • Who Cares? Scotland
  • Includem
  • Centre for Youth and Criminal Justice
  • Third sector organisations working directly with children, young people and women at risk from violence and abuse; and those providing support to asylum seekers and culturally isolated communities.

Contribution to National Outcomes

  • Finding employment can be particularly difficult for young people who have been at risk.
  • SCRA's employment of young people with an experience of care offers them the opportunity to:
  • Access high-quality employment and training.
  • Gain a recognised qualification and experience to move on to study or further employment with or out with SCRA.
  • Receive a living wage salary with exposure to a range of roles and experiences across the organisation.
  • Contribute meaningfully to the important agenda of improving outcomes for other children, young people and families at risk.
  • The involvement of young people with care experience in the work of SCRA ensures that the organisation draws on relevant experience to continue to improve its approach and its engagement with children, young people and families at risk.

We live our lives safe from crime, disorder and danger

Example contribution by the Scottish Prison Service ( SPS)

Reducing re-offending and penal reform

  • The Scottish Government is committed to improving public safety and breaking the cycle of offending by providing access to robust community sentences, where appropriate, and relevant rehabilitation and reintegration back into the community for people in custody.

Budget

The SPS budget totals £357m in 2016-17.

Achievements

  • SPS contributes towards making Scotland safer by ensuring the delivery of secure custody, safe and ordered prisons, decent standards of care and opportunities for prisoners to develop in ways that help them reintegrate into the community.

Key partners

SPS works with a wide range of key partners including:

  • Local authority criminal justice social work.
  • Education Scotland.
  • NHS Health Boards.
  • SPS has in place a range of innovative programmes and partnerships to benefit individuals within its care. SPS's Delivery Plan for 2016-17 sets out the key activities and priorities for the year.

Contribution to National Outcomes

  • SPS contributes towards making Scotland safer, protecting the public and reducing reoffending, by ensuring the delivery of secure custody, safe and ordered prisons, decent standards of care and opportunities for prisoners to develop in ways that help them reintegrate into the community.
  • SPS provides access to education and training activities within prison designed to equip prisoners to make the most of their time and prepare for life after their sentence.
  • SPS's Throughcare Support Officers prepare and support prisoners before and after their release. SPS has specific strategies in place recognising the particular needs of women and young people in their care.

We live in well-designed, sustainable places where we are able to access the amenities and services we need

Example contribution by Architecture & Design Scotland (A&DS) A&DS Business Plan 2016/17 - support for Year of Innovation, Architecture & Design 2016

  • A&DS is Scotland's champion for good design and sustainable places - topics that matter to people and provide a basis for empowering communities, reducing inequality and improving services.
  • A&DS' work involves helping those who commission, design, regulate and use buildings by:
  • Giving advice on new development proposals.
  • Providing resources to build capacity and knowledge.
  • Promoting the benefits of design through a programme of exhibitions and events across Scotland.
  • Working with communities to explore new ways of empowering them to influence decisions about their places.
  • Supporting collaboration amongst networks of professionals and volunteers.
  • The emphasis within all of this is to add value to the work of others and ensure that good design is recognised as a means of achieving good outcomes.

Budget

The total budget for this work was £1.8m including partnership funding.

Achievements

  • In 2016, A&DS provided advice to 56 development proposals; published 25 case studies; delivered 162 local and community events; commissioned 2 touring exhibitions which they took to 15 venues; presented 1 permanent exhibition and 7 temporary exhibitions in their Lighthouse Gallery; delivered 13 continuing professional development events for practitioners, 10 workshops for students and created a resource pack that was downloaded by 500 community groups.
  • This work resulted in more people benefiting from well-designed buildings, more people having a say in what their places are like and more people taking time to engage with and think about their local environment.
  • The work has allowed A&DS to make new partnerships with over 60 groups and organisations across the country that will provide the basis for future engagement and has increased wider awareness of the benefits to people of well-designed, sustainable places.

Key partners

  • Scottish Government
  • Forestry Commission Scotland
  • Creative Scotland
  • British Council Scotland
  • Royal Incorporation of Architects
  • Heads of Planning Scotland
  • A&DS' advisory work was delivered via design workshops in collaboration with Health Facilities Scotland; Scottish Government; Local Health Boards; NHS Health Scotland; Local Authorities; Key Agencies and Scottish Futures Trust. The primary contribution from each of these partners is their willingness to collaborate to achieve positive outcomes.
  • The public programme of events and exhibitions was delivered with support from the Royal Incorporation of Architects in Scotland; Local Authorities; Scottish Government; Creative Scotland; Visit Scotland; British Council Scotland; Forestry Commission Scotland; Zero Waste Scotland. Many of these partners provided financial contributions - all helped in a range of ways: shared communication channels, staff time and use of resources, for example, providing event space.

Contribution to National Outcomes

  • A&DS champions the creation of well-designed, sustainable places. In 2016 it sought to use the opportunity of a national celebration of innovation, architecture and design to extend its reach and explore new ways of engaging audiences.
  • In addition to their on-going advisory, promotional and capacity building work, A&DS commissioned and deployed a series of specific pieces of work to link design more directly to the communities they serve and to support effective collaboration:
  • In supporting the implementation of the Place Standard, A&DS ran workshops with groups of all ages across Scotland to help communities articulate the issues that matter to them.
  • With Prospect North they presented a series of innovative approaches to show how design intervention can empower communities across Scotland.
  • Through SH2A they engaged communities from Shetland to Dumfries and Galloway in a celebration and exploration of their places.
  • By supporting local design panels in 6 local authority areas A&DS helped build capacity and support for well designed, sustainable places.
  • Their Materials Library has helped link new materials and techniques with students and practitioners in an effort to build more sustainably.
  • The A&DS Student Awards provide recognition and a showcase for the next generation of designers.

We have strong, resilient and supportive communities where people take responsibility for their own actions and how they affect others

Example contribution by the Scottish Fire & Rescue Service ( SFRS)

Home Fire Safety Visit

This mechanism lends itself well to working with partners to achieve the following:

  • NHS Highland trained SFRS staff to carry out Alcohol Brief Interventions ( ABIs). An ABI may result from a short non-confrontational structured conversation with the person, aimed at obtaining an accurate picture of their alcohol consumption, pattern of drinking and personal circumstances. Following a trial period, of 402 Home Fire Safety Visits, SFRS staff have carried out 30 ABIs.
  • Responding to Falls in Aberdeen. Where a person has had a fall in the home and is not injured but the health professional may require assistance to lift the person, a local SFRS crew is called to assist. These are in cases where NHS assistance is more than an hour away or where the person may become unwell if left waiting.
  • Living Safely in the Home in Scottish Borders. As part of the local Reducing Inequalities Strategy, SFRS and Scottish Borders Council ( SBC) Safer Communities team work jointly on keeping people living safely in their home. Trained SFRS staff can assess all aspects of risk within the home including from fire, slips, trips, falls and fuel poverty. A pilot launched in June 2016 is currently running in Cheviot, aligned to the SBC's Localities project and targeted at 65+ years old. SFRS's home visits in Cheviot include SFRS staff making a falls assessment; giving advice as needed; and providing aids and adaptations. SFRS refer onwards to NHS occupational therapists for a full assessment when necessary. The Cheviot pilot is being evaluated. SFRS, with SBC, will use its findings to inform further roll-out.
  • Level 1 Falls Assessment in South Lanarkshire. NHS Falls team and SFRS staff receive reciprocal training in relation to fire and falls. Whilst carrying our Home Fire Safety Visits, SFRS staff are trained to educate the public on falls prevention, and to process referrals to professional NHS support when needed. Likewise, the NHS Falls teams have been trained on fire risk recognition, and can refer to SFRs patients or households at risk.
  • Telecare Provision in Fife. SFRS work in partnership with Fife Social Work, NHS24 and Fife Housing to identify vulnerable members of the community who would benefit from telecare equipment. Social Work assess all new service users and arrange for the appropriate equipment to be installed. Users are then linked to the Council's 24 hour call centre. Working closely with Social Work, SFRS help protect these vulnerable clients and their property, and telecare has become an integral part of the Home Safety Assessment services SFRS provides locally.

Budget

SFRS received an annual resource budget in 2016-17 of £259m.

Achievements

  • Effective early identification of various homes or communities at risk due to different vulnerabilities (age-related or inequality-related).
  • Effective early referral to specialist health or social care services as required and as appropriate to the identified need.
  • Skilled and supportive visits to people's home, and to schools and communities, which are welcomed, trusted and non-threatening.
  • Demonstrated success at working collaboratively with other public services, and directly with the public, to build community capacity to respond to the changing risk profiles of our communities (for example. the ageing population).
  • Demonstrated success at nudging behaviour change on the part of individuals and communities (for example, relating to alcohol consumption).

Key partners

  • NHS
  • NHS24
  • Scottish Ambulance Service
  • Local authorities and wider Community Planning Partnerships
  • Scottish Government
  • Police Scotland
  • Third sector community-based organisations
  • SFRS have been highly forward-thinking and creative in using the mechanism of the Home Fire Safety Visit as a means for firefighters and other public service staff to work in collaboration to make progress against larger goals which lie beyond the gift of any one organisation to deliver.
  • This imaginative use of existing public assets - including making positive use of the deep trust the public feel towards their local fire and rescue service - supports the shift needed by government and all its partners towards delivering this National Outcome.

Contribution to National Outcomes

  • The 5 sketches offered above illustrate the various ways in which SFRS's Home Fire Safety Visits have a positive impact on helping to build strong, resilient and supportive communities, working in partnership with other organisations and with communities themselves. For example:
  • Highland: Alcohol Brief Interventions are a key element of the Scottish Government's Alcohol Strategy and contribute to reducing alcohol-related harm by helping individuals cut down their drinking.
  • Scottish Borders: Preventative activity by SFRS aims to reduce pressure on emergency A&E admissions to hospital, especially of elderly people.
  • South Lanarkshire: The falls programme supports a systematic, coordinated and personcentred approach to falls and fracture prevention. The programme makes a significant local contribution to supporting people, in an integrated way, to look after and improve their own health and wellbeing.
  • Fife: working collaboratively with Social Work and Housing to identify and support vulnerable members of the community.

We value and enjoy our built environment and protect it and enhance it for future generations

Example contribution by the Scottish Environment Protection Agency ( SEPA)

Better Environmental Regulation ( BER) Programme

  • Through the BER Programme, the Scottish Government and SEPA are providing a simpler legislative and regulatory framework so that SEPA can be more transparent, accountable, proportionate, consistent and targeted in its approach. This will:
  • Ensure more effective and efficient protection of the environment.
  • Reduce the regulatory burden on business.
  • Make it easier for customers to comply with environmental obligations.
  • Help tackle environmental crime.

Budget

Aside from existing staff costs, there is no specific budget for the programme.

Achievements

  • Key benefits already realised from the programme include:
  • A new statutory purpose for SEPA, supported by statutory guidance from the Scottish Ministers.
  • New sentencing options for courts to help tackle environmental crime.
  • A range of new enforcement tools for SEPA to deter non-compliance and support a preventative approach.
  • A simplified, more risk-based charging scheme for SEPA which helps ensure a more equitable distribution of charges among SEPA customers and which incentivises compliance and better environmental performance.
  • Work is currently underway to develop an integrated authorisation framework to streamline, simplify and standardise SEPA main environmental authorisation regimes.

Key partners

  • Crown Office and Procurator Fiscal Service
  • Scottish Courts and Tribunal Service
  • Regulated businesses and environmental groups
  • The BER Programme is being delivered in partnership by the Scottish Government and SEPA, with contributions from a range of other public sector entities where appropriate. This has included engagement with the UK Government, other devolved administrations, and other EU and non- EU governments to discuss shared agendas and identify lessons learned and best practice.
  • Stakeholder input and feedback has also been vital in terms of developing and delivering key programme workstreams. A series of consultations, and other stakeholder engagement exercises, have been undertaken and have played a significant role in shaping the broad direction of travel, as well as specific policy proposals.

Contribution to National Outcomes

  • The BER programme will deliver a simpler, more risk-based legislative and regulatory framework, enabling SEPA to operate in a more efficient and targeted fashion, and in ways that supports business innovation.
  • This will help ensure that SEPA can focus on tackling the major environmental risks and harms, ensuring that the environment and the health and wellbeing of our communities are protected, while also supporting and incentivising businesses who want to comply with, or go beyond, their environmental obligations.
  • By giving SEPA and the courts additional powers to hit environmental criminal hard, the BER programme will also help create a level playing field for businesses; ensuring that no-one profits from causing environmental damage and that legitimate business is not undercut.

We take pride in a strong, fair and inclusive national identity

Example contribution by VisitScotland

Spirit of Scotland

  • The Spirit of Scotland is VisitScotland's first ever global brand campaign. It is underpinned by developments in digital activity, customer experience, and partnerships.
  • The Spirit of Scotland was designed to capture all the qualities that make Scotland a special destination, not least of which is the warmth of the welcome and the generosity of spirit offered by Scotland's very best asset, the people.
  • Through broadcast films and mini-documentaries as well as a targeted social media campaign, #ScotSpirit, VisitScotland has been driving consumers to its relaunched website which has been enhanced with rich and personalised online content, including a new Trip Planner and Online Community. A focused email campaign programme, alongside the creation of thematic ebooks, has supported this activity.
  • The campaign has also seen VisitScotland working with leading international media partners, ensuring they have high quality, high impact content that allows many more people to discover Scotland.

Budget

£4.5m

Achievements

  • Development of the Spirit of Scotland brand, including the production of two 'Spirit of Scotland' brand films and a series of mini-documentaries along with associated media distribution.
  • New media and content partnerships with Media Scotland, The Guardian, STV, NBC, The New York Times and Google.
  • World-first destination product with Tripadvisor to improve the Scottish content on the Tripadvisor site, extending our reach exponentially.
  • New website with a vastly improved experience across all platforms.
  • Spirit of Scotland Pass with Calmac and Abellio, enabling integrated travel via rail and ferry.
  • Online community, an interactive digital platform on VisitScotland.com that enables Scots and those who love Scotland to engage with visitors from all over the world to help them understand what Scotland has to offer.
  • Public Relations programme with major publications and broadcasters as well as working with bloggers and YouTubers.
  • Partnership with the Family Holiday Association to enable 100 families from socially or economically disadvantaged backgrounds to take a break as a result of industry donations.

Key partners

Content partners:

  • TripAdvisor
  • NBC
  • Media Scotland
  • The Guardian

Campaign partners:

  • ScotRail
  • Calmac
  • This campaign was delivered following extensive consumer research conducted by VisitScotland which led to the development of a new global brand, the Spirit of Scotland.
  • Partnership working was central to the success of this initiative. A series of industry engagements took place across Scotland to secure the support of Scottish businesses and strategic partners such as Scotrail and Calmac. A new approach to partnership working with key brands such as NBC and Tripadvisor resulted in VisitScotland extending its reach exponentially.
  • This new approach to partnership working went beyond the traditional monetary relationship with agreement reached on content sharing for mutual benefit. Traditional marketing channels, for example TV, were supplemented with engagement with new digital channels and an extensive social media campaign, as well as a comprehensive PR programme.
  • The campaign was supported by investment in digital platforms which allowed for richer engagement, online personalisation and more cost effective delivery.

Contribution to National Outcomes

  • Extensive consumer research identified that the Scotland tourism brand is defined by an accumulation of experiences and a special spirit that touches all those who visit. The Spirit of Scotland campaign has brought that national brand to life.
  • To date more than 65m people have viewed our broadcast films and mini-documentaries and referrals generated from visitscotland.com have a potential worth of more than £500m to Scottish businesses (up 15% year-on-year) while our costs of acquiring those referrals have decreased by over 30%.
  • Engagement rates achieved on social channels place us number 1 and 2 on Facebook and Instagram respectively compared with our competitors. Facebook users' intent to visit Scotland has jumped 19% among 45-54 year olds.
  • We have seen improving performance across other communication channels, with an 8% increase in opt-ins to our database (now at 2.7m) and a 49% increase in sign-ups to our e-news. Our online community has thrived in the first four months with over half a million page views and close to 2,500 active users.

We reduce the local and global environmental impact of our consumption and production

Example contribution by Scottish Water

Scottish Water Capital Funding

  • Scottish Water has reduced its operational greenhouse gas emission footprint by 15% since 2006/07. Crucial to this achievement has been reducing energy use and generating renewable energy.
  • Over 4000 smart meters have been installed to target these opportunities. Energy initiatives across the business since have cut base electricity consumption by 4.5% in the last 5 years and doubled Scottish Water's renewable generation capacity to over 54 GWh since 2013. Scottish Water now has over 28 hydro turbines, 18 small scale wind turbines, 24 solar schemes, 2 biomass plants and 3 combined heat and power plants alongside third party owned wind turbines hosted on Scottish Water land which generate a further 223 GWh.
  • Scottish Water's energy strategy is fully aligned with the Scottish Government's Hydro Nation policy supporting a Greener and Stronger Economy, reducing the price of water for consumers and making the Water Industry more sustainable.

Budget

Scottish Water has an annual turnover of around £1.1bn and its energy programme contributes to reduced costs.

Achievements

  • In just three years Scottish Water has raised the annual financial benefits from its energy programme to over £7m, cut carbon emissions by 15% since 2006/07 and facilitated over £0.3bn of private investment on its estate, making a significant contribution to national economic, carbon and renewable energy targets.
  • Over 70 of its water and wastewater treatment plants are either self-sufficient or partly sufficient in their power requirements over the year leading to lower operating costs and a more sustainable business.
  • Scottish Water is also supporting the local economy and the communities it serves by connecting its treatment assets to locally owned renewable generation via a private wire and power purchase agreement. The first of these was commissioned in September 2016.
  • Scottish Water's innovative approach to maximising value from its assets won the company the 'Renewing Scotland' Award at the annual Scottish Green Energy Awards in December 2015.

Key partners

Scottish Water works with a range of energy partners including:

  • Ross-shire Engineering, Inverness (hydro project and maintenance partner)
  • Black and Veatch UK (hydro programme delivery)
  • R&A Group, Glasgow (Photovoltaic installation and maintenance partner)
  • Gilkes, Kendal UK (Hydro turbine manufacturer and supplier)
  • Britwind (Ecotricity) UK (small wind turbine supplier)
  • SHARC Energy systems and Borders College Campus - the UKs first heat from sewage scheme. Provides 95% of the heat for the campus c5,500 students
  • EoN UK, SSE and Scottish Power (hosting onshore wind turbines)
  • Scottish Water's engagement with communities, from feasibility to delivery of each scheme, has ensured each project is fully consulted on and supported locally. More recent schemes, for example Laurencekirk, have also provided a community benefit in line with Government best practice.
  • Careful consideration was given to ensure projects could be integrated into existing civil infrastructure and live processes without compromising high service standards. This was achieved through collaboration across various disciplines and a diverse supply chain. A priority on safety and wellbeing ensured zero accidents throughout.
  • Value for customers has been achieved by using the most appropriate technology for each site. This diversification and agility has also protected Scottish Water's customers from rapid changes in UK energy policy and support.
  • Selection of the right investment partners has enabled Scottish Water to deploy innovative technology, for example the UKs first heat from sewage scheme in Galashiels, reducing exposure and risk to customers while technologies are proven.

Contribution to National Outcomes

  • Scottish Water is one of the largest users of electricity in Scotland, requiring around 445GWh to provide essential services to customers from over 4500 operational sites. Scottish Water has focused on renewable energy generation and energy demand management to reduce costs and lower its carbon footprint.
  • By the end of 2016/17 Scottish Water will be generating and hosting more renewable energy than it consumes annually, and over twice by 2018.
  • As a vital utility industry that serves a growing population and the wider business community, reducing costs and carbon impacts in treating, delivering and processing water and waste water benefits everyone in Scotland and around the world.

Our people are able to maintain their independence as they get older and are able to access appropriate support when they need it Example contribution by NHS National Services Scotland - Information Services Division ( ISD)

Source - the Health and Social Care Data Integration and Intelligence Project, and the Local Intelligence Support Team ( LIST)

  • Source and LIST provide Health and Social Care Partnerships with data and analytical support they need to inform processes, such as strategic commissioning, allowing Partnerships to redesign services to better meet the needs of older people.
  • Source supports the on-going development of an extensive database of linked data on health and social care activity, costs and demographic information.
  • LIST offers each Health and Social Care Partnership an information specialist from ISD to ensure that they can make best use of the data provided by Source, as well as supporting outcomes monitoring, benchmarking, data validation, dataset design, statistical analysis, interpretation, data visualisation and data management.
  • Source aims to improve data sharing across health and social care, allowing different sets of data to be linked in ways that were not previously possible, particularly around patterns of care and how resources are being used. LIST enables Partnerships to make best use of this data, providing support to look at forecasting costs, pathway analysis to show how people move from one service to another, and the resource associated with the use of different services at a local population level.

Budget

The Scottish Government is investing £1.4 million in 2016/17 with ISD for them to continue to support and develop Source and LIST further.

Achievements

  • Source has provided a new, extensive database of linked data on health and social care activity and costs and demographic information for use by Local Authorities, NHS Boards and Health and Social Care Partnerships.
  • LIST has provided the opportunity for each Health and Social Care Partnerships to have dedicated analytical and information management expertise (approximately 0.5 full time equivalent per Partnership) working in their local areas within their own teams. LIST staff also network with a range of national experts, maximising use of national and local data holdings.
  • Together, these projects are providing Health and Social Care Partnerships, the NHS and Local Authorities with improved data and analysis which they need to redesign services for older people which allow them to better maintain their independence as they get older and are able to access appropriate support when they need it.
  • The support provided by Source and LIST has been widely welcomed by the Partnerships themselves, as well as being highlighted in Audit Scotland's report "Changing Models of Health and Social Care" as an example of good practice in providing support for Partnerships.

Key partners

  • ISD worked closely with Health and Social Care Partnerships, local authorities and NHS Boards, as well as the Scottish Government and the Scottish Information Commissioner.
  • A wide range of other organisations have also been involved in the work, including Healthcare Improvement Scotland, Community Planning Partnerships, and Third sector organisations.
  • Securing the necessary information governance arrangements which allowed the data to be included within the database required the engagement and support of local authorities and NHS Boards and the Scottish Information Commissioner to ensure that sensitive data within the database was handled in a legal and appropriate way.
  • Delivery of LIST involved building up an understanding culture, capacity and capability at a local level and building relationships to ensure that the analysts were able to provide the best possible support to Partnerships.

Contribution to National Outcomes

  • The data and analysis provided by Source and LIST at community and individual level (suitably anonymised) is crucial in understanding the needs of a population, and this is particularly important in allowing Health and Social Care Partnerships to meet the needs of older people.
  • All standard reports available through Source have a drill down facility to show the amount and proportion of health and social care services used by older people (for example unplanned stays in hospital). In addition, pathways can be mapped to show chronological service interactions by the elderly that allows Partnerships to identify inefficiencies and opportunities for re-design to improve care.
  • Using this information to identify the needs of older people allows Health and Social Care Partnerships to redesign services for older people which allow them to better maintain their independence as they get older and ensures that they are able to access appropriate support when they need it.

Our public services are high quality, continually improving, efficient and responsive to local people's needs

Example contribution by Children's Hearings Scotland ( CHS)

CHS

  • CHS supports members of the Children's Panel to make decisions which improve the life chances of children and young people at risk.
  • It recruits, trains and supports around 2,500 volunteers from local communities to sit as panel members on children's hearings and appoints a further 400 volunteers to local management posts in 22 Area Support Teams ( ASTs).
  • Children's hearings decide whether statutory compulsory measures of supervision are required to effect improvements in children and young people's lives.

Budget

£3.7m

Achievements

  • Children's Hearings Scotland brings together children, young people, families, panel members and public services from local communities, to make decisions designed to improve the welfare of children and young people in those communities.
  • CHS carries out a rolling programme of consultation which informs their practice and drives continuous improvement. In 2015/16:
  • CHS produced a Participation Framework which embedded consultation with children and young people into each of their core processes, and conducted a programme of workshops with children and young people.
  • CHS involved care experienced children and young people in the design and delivery of panel member training, the design and functionality of their website, as well as involving young people in the recruitment of senior staff and volunteers.
  • CHS improved the support and service they provide to their volunteers using the feedback provided through their Community Survey.
  • Children's Hearings Scotland ensure high quality decisions are made by panel members, which support positive outcomes for children and families, through their programme of panel member training, support for panel member practice, and panel member observations. In 2015/16:
  • CHS recruited 424 new panel members, reappointed 1,313 existing panel and Area Support Team members, and allocated 2,335 serving panel members panel members onto a rota of 34,896 hearings for 15,087 children and young people.
  • The Children's Hearings Training Unit ( CHSTU) delivered seven-day pre service training to over 455 volunteer trainee panel members, over 70,000 hours of core training to over 1,800 panel members, and information governance training to over 2000 Panel and Area Support Team members.
  • CHS facilitated over 300 requests for panel member continuity, advice, and enforcement.
  • CHS conducted over 4,000 panel member observations.

Key partners

  • CHS engaged in partnership working at a local and national level with key public and voluntary organisations to promote the welfare of vulnerable children and young people.
  • CHS entered into a National Training Contract with West Lothian College (that is CHSTU), which delivered a programme of e-learning at the national level, and allocated local learning and development budgets to Area Support Teams. Other contracts were supported to provide IT and media services.
  • CHS delivers its recruitment, reappointment and rota functions through our 22 volunteer Area Support Teams with support from local authority clerks.
  • CHS engaged in partnership working at a local and national level with key public and voluntary organisations to promote the welfare of vulnerable children and young people.

Contribution to National Outcomes

  • CHS ensures that they are continually improving and responsive to the needs of stakeholders through their programmes of internal and external consultation and partnership work. In particular, during 2015/16:
  • CHS embedded consultation with children and young people into each of their core processes under their Participation Framework.
  • CHS improved the support they provide to their volunteers through their Community Survey, Area Convener's Liaison Group, and volunteer workshops in conjunction with Volunteer Scotland.
  • CHS strengthened the capacity of their local and national leadership teams, through a leadership event held in partnership with Lloyd's Banking Group.
  • CHS conducted the first data collection in relation to the implementation of compulsory supervision orders by implementation authorities, under the "feedback loop".
  • CHS identified a shared vision for the future use of information technology within the Children's Hearings System, in partnership with the Scottish Children's Reporter Administration, under their joint Digital Strategy.
  • CHS influenced practice and policy to the benefit of children and young people through their participation in 22 partnership working groups.

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