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Publication - Report

Scotland's first adoption activity day: evaluation

Published: 1 Dec 2016
Part of:
Children and families, Communities and third sector
ISBN:
9781786526236

Findings from October 2015 event organised by Scotland's Adoption Register.

26 page PDF

616.7kB

26 page PDF

616.7kB

Contents
Scotland's first adoption activity day: evaluation
10. The prospective adopters

26 page PDF

616.7kB

10. The prospective adopters

' We were really worried about coming, our social worker reassured us but the thought of meeting the children seemed very daunting, supposing they didn't like us. But it worked out fine it was very well organised with lots going on so we could blend in. I found talking with the children difficult we were meant to be casual but interested. It wasn't casual for us it mattered so much.'

Comment from a prospective adopter

' Really good, all seemed to enjoy themselves. (Although could see some overwhelmed) Perhaps more quiet areas.'

Comment from a prospective adopter

10.1 All the prospective adopters completed feedback forms and all were very positive, their comments were invariably focused on the children's experiences. Some said they felt overwhelmed by the size of the event and the noise level.

10.2 I also interviewed four prospective adopters in their own homes and I travelled to the North of England to meet one family. These in depth discussions were worthwhile as whilst being very child focused in their feedback forms, the adopters were more willing to discuss their own feelings and attitudes to the events in a personal discussion.

10.3 The prospective adopters I met enjoyed the aspect of fancy dress and felt that it conveyed to the children that they were 'fun' people who were willing to join in. All had no difficulty engaging with the children and put this down to the fancy dress. It may also have been due to a willingness to sit on the floor and join in as appropriate.

10.4 Some adopters had also attended activity days in England and they felt that the one in Scotland they had attended whilst being quite large was not as overwhelming as some of the larger events held in England. As there are more adopters than children waiting currently in England, the adopters felt that there was a sense of underlying competition between families which was much less evident in Scotland.

10.5 The prospective adopters did think that meeting the children could lead to them widening their choices and what they could offer a child.

10.6 The research by the University of Bristol found that there was a delicate balance to be achieved between respecting the views of prospective adopters about the children they felt they could offer a home to, and the risks of persuading them to alter their views. One of the recommendations of the study was to;

'Improve linking and matching practice to remove the sense of 'winners' and 'losers' in the process, and discourage the stretching of adoptive parents' preferences. Matching a child with adoptive parents whose expressed preferences are different to those of the child increases risks of disruption.' [9]


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