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Publication - Statistics publication

Scottish Social Attitudes Survey 2017: data trust annex

Published: 26 Jun 2018
Directorate:
Strategy and Constitution Directorate
Part of:
Statistics
ISBN:
9781787810501

Findings of the SSA 2017 covering level of trust in public service organisations and private companies to use personal data only for acceptable purposes.

7 page PDF

483.4 kB

7 page PDF

483.4 kB

Contents
Scottish Social Attitudes Survey 2017: data trust annex
Variations in attitudes between subgroups

7 page PDF

483.4 kB

Variations in attitudes between subgroups

Levels of trust in public service organisations and private companies to use personal data for acceptable purposes varied across population subgroups. The main differences are discussed below and are from subgroups where there were statistically significant differences [3] .

Trust in public service organisations varied across subgroups as follows:

  • Living comfortably –Those living comfortably on their present income were more likely to trust public service organisations to use personal data than those struggling to live on their present income.
  • Main income source – Those whose main income source was wages or private income were more likely to trust public service organisations to use personal data than those whose main income source was state benefits.
  • Educational qualifications –Those with a degree or equivalent were more likely to trust public service organisations to use personal data than those with no formal qualifications.
  • Economic activity – Those in education or full time training were the most likely to trust public service organisations to use personal data. Those in work or waiting to take up work are more likely to trust public service organisations to use personal data than those in retirement or unemployed.
  • Age – Young people (16-24) were more likely to trust public service organisations to use personal data. The older the age category the less likely those are to trust public service organisations to use personal data.
  • Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation ( SIMD) – Those in the least deprived areas were more likely to trust public service organisations to use personal data than those in the most deprived areas.

Trust in private companies varied across subgroups as follows:

  • Age – Around a quarter of young people (16-24) trusted private companies to use personal data; more than any other age category.
  • Economic activity – Those in education or full time training were the most likely to trust private companies to use personal data. Those in work or waiting to take up work were more likely to trust private companies to use personal data only than those in retirement or unemployed.

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