beta

You're viewing our new website - find out more

Publication - Guidance

Scottish Welfare Fund: statutory guidance June 2018

Published: 1 Jun 2018
Part of:
Equality and rights, Public sector
ISBN:
9781788519687

The Scottish Welfare Fund (SWF) aims to provide a safety net to people on low incomes through Crisis Grants and Community Care Grants.

70 page PDF

700.7kB

70 page PDF

700.7kB

Contents
Scottish Welfare Fund: statutory guidance June 2018
Annex C: Factors That Might Increase The Vulnerability Of An Applicant

70 page PDF

700.7kB

Annex C: Factors That Might Increase The Vulnerability Of An Applicant

Some examples of factors that could contribute to a vulnerability which would give an application higher priority are set out below. This is not an exhaustive list and should not be used rigidly as a prioritisation list.

  • Frailty or old age, particularly restricted mobility or difficulty performing personal care tasks
  • Learning difficulties
  • Poor literacy or numeracy skills
  • Mental health issues
  • Physical impairment or disability, including sensory impairments
  • Chronic illnesses
  • Terminal illnesses
  • Addictions or misuse of alcohol, drugs or other substances
  • Being an person with a conviction
  • People fleeing domestic abuse
  • People facing non-domestic abuse
  • Being a young person affected by the UK Government’s changes, from 1 April 2017, to entitlement to housing costs within Universal Credit for 18-21 year olds
  • Being a young person leaving local authority care or a special residential school
  • Being a young person who does not have parents or is unable to live with their parents because it would put them in danger or they have become estranged
  • Looking after children for a relative or friend as a kinship carer
  • Being a lone parent
  • Children living with young parents aged under 25
  • Children living with a disabled adult
  • Children living in a large family with three or more children
  • Experiencing separation, relationship or family breakdown
  • Being a family who has been judged to be facing exceptional pressure
  • Being pregnant, recent childbirth or adopting a child
  • Having responsibility as a main care giver
  • Homelessness, or repeated homelessness or under threat of homelessness
  • Repeated failed tenancies
  • Having an unsettled way of life (living in hostels, sofa-surfing, not having your own address)
  • Experiencing eviction or re-possession
  • Experiencing redundancy
  • Leaving the armed forces
  • A history of insecure work
  • Being recently bereaved (immediate/close family member/spouse/partner)
  • Refugee

Contact