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Publication - Report

Addressing race inequality in Scotland: the way forward

A report from the Scottish Government's independent adviser on race equality in Scotland.

30 page PDF

501.9 kB

30 page PDF

501.9 kB

Contents
Addressing race inequality in Scotland: the way forward
Introduction

30 page PDF

501.9 kB

Introduction

In my first paper, I set out what in my view were the critical areas where I thought that progress could be made to tackle race inequality in Scotland. Concentrating on these areas would make a difference to the lives of people on the ground. This report is a follow on from that initial paper and builds on my discussions and engagement with a broad range of stakeholders and sources of evidence. These include experts and officials both within and external to government as well as recent research/review reports on race equality in Scotland. It also takes into account the recommendations by Naomi Eisenstadt, the former Independent Poverty Adviser and the commitments in the Fairer Scotland Action Plan.

As requested by the Cabinet Secretary for Communities, Social Security and Equalities, this report sets out a number of recommendations and actions for inclusion in a new Race Equality Delivery Plan 2017-2021. The Plan is the first strand of a 15 year Race Equality Framework with the overarching vision for a fairer Scotland for people of all ethnicities by 2030.

My views and recommendations are set out under the following key policy areas:

A. General/Cross cutting issues

B. Employment

C. Poverty

D. Housing

E. Health

F. Education

G. Gypsy Travellers

I have not included Hate Crime in the list of priority areas because the Independent Advisory Group on Hate Crime, Prejudice and Community Cohesion report is wide-ranging and includes the action points set out in the Race Equality Framework. What is crucial, particularly in this febrile Brexit climate, is that the recommendations in the Hate Crime Report are implemented in full.

In making these recommendations and proposing these actions, I firmly believe that we can begin to make progress in tackling race inequality in Scotland. Whilst these actions in themselves will not address every aspect of race inequality, they will form a helpful and constructive basis on which further actions can be progressed.

Kaliani Lyle
Independent Race Equality Adviser to the Scottish Government
December 2017


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