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Publication - Consultation paper

Nutritional requirements for food and drink in schools: consultation

Proposed amendments to the Nutritional Requirements for Food and Drink in Schools (Scotland) Regulations 2008.

11 page PDF

307.5kB

11 page PDF

307.5kB

Contents
Nutritional requirements for food and drink in schools: consultation
Theme Five - Any other comments

11 page PDF

307.5kB

Theme Five - Any other comments

Introduction

When the school food and drink Regulations were introduced in 2008/9, we were clear they should be viewed as a set of minimum standards on which to build in the following years. Since then, significant investment has been made in school food and drink provision and we all have much to be proud of.

We recognise changing eating habits is a journey and will take time, but we are clear there is no room for complacency in that journey if we are to ensure our children and young people continue to develop positive eating habits that will inform the choices they make in the years to come.

The school food and drink Regulations can support the learning pupils receive via Curriculum for Excellence by helping to ensure food and drinks provided in schools demonstrates what a balanced and nutritious diet should look like over the course of a week. The school food and drink Regulations cannot address issues in relation to how that learning in food and health is delivered or the facilities and resources which determine how school food and drink is provided.

If there is anything else you feel could be changed in the school food and drink Regulations that would better help ensure children and young people are able to make balanced and nutritious choices during the school day we would like to hear about it.

Question Five

Do you have anything else you wish to comment on in relation to the nutritional content of food and drink provided in local authority, and grant maintained, schools in Scotland via the School food and drink Regulations?


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