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Publication - Statistics Publication

Inpatient experience survey 2016, volume 3: exploring differences in experience

Published: 4 Apr 2017
Part of:
Health and social care
ISBN:
9781786528773

This report explores the differences in self-reported experience of people who responded to the inpatient experience survey 2016.

39 page PDF

1.7MB

39 page PDF

1.7MB

Contents
Inpatient experience survey 2016, volume 3: exploring differences in experience
Results - Operations And Procedures

39 page PDF

1.7MB

Results - Operations And Procedures

Summary

Over half of the people who responded to the survey had an operation or procedure and they were mostly positive about explanations provided about the operation or procedure.

Nine of the characteristics investigated indicated a significant impact on the differences seen in responses relating to people's experience of operations and procedures. Males and people staying in other type hospitals are significantly more positive for questions relating to operations and procedures.

People who reported fair or poor health; a pre-existing health condition; live in SIMD 4 or SIMD 5 (least deprived) areas and those admitted as an emergency are significantly more negative.

Operations and procedures

Five of the survey questions relate to people's experience when they had an operation or a procedure, nine of the 14 characteristics investigated are associated with variation seen for these questions (Figure 7).

Figure 7: Number of questions affected by various characteristics - operations and procedures

Figure 7: Number of questions affected by various characteristics – operations and procedures

All characteristics related to these questions are detailed in Table 10. Males are significantly more positive than females regarding questions relating to operations and procedures. People living in accessible small towns and accessible rural areas are significantly more positive than those living in large urban areas.

People who were admitted as an emergency were significantly more negative for questions relating to operations and procedures as were those who reported fair or poor health. This is reflected in the people who have pre-existing health conditions also being significantly more negative.

Table 10: Significant response compared to reference group - Operation and Procedure

Question

Positive

Negative

Beforehand, staff explained risks/ benefits in a way you could understand

Males;
Christian;
Other hospitals

Emergency admissions;
Fair and poor health;
physical disability, chronic pain for at least 3 months, more than one long term health condition

Beforehand, explanation of what would be done

Males

Emergency admissions;
Fair and poor health;
Chronic pain lasting at least 3 months, deafness or severe hearing impairment, more than one long term health condition;
SIMD 4, SIMD 5

Beforehand, told how expected to feel after operation or procedure

Males;
Other religions and Christian;
Other urban, accessible small town and accessible rural areas;
Other hospitals

Emergency admissions;
Age 25-34, 75+;
chronic pain lasting at least 3 months, more than one long term health condition;
SIMD 3, SIMD 4, SIMD 5

Beforehand, questions answered in a way you could understand

Males;
Other urban, accessible small town, remote small town and accessible rural areas

Emergency admissions;
Fair and poor health;
physical disability, chronic pain lasting at least 3 months, more than one long health term condition;
SIMD 4

After, explained how it had gone in a way you could understand

Males;
Accessible small town, remote small towns and accessible rural areas;
Other hospitals

Emergency admissions;
Fair and poor health;
chronic pain lasting at least 3 months,
other long term health condition,
more than one long term health condition

Age explains differences in only one of the five questions asked about operations and procedures. Those aged between 25-34 and 75 and older are significantly more negative than those aged 16-24 for the question relating to how they would be expected to feel after an operation or procedure.

Where a person lives is also shown to be associated with some of the differences seen. In general, people living in SIMD 4 or SIMD 5 (least deprived) areas are significantly more negative, as are those living in other urban, accessible small towns and accessible rural areas.


Contact

Email: Nicola Kerr